Windows

Regain hard disk space by using Windows Update Cleanup in Windows 7 and 8.x

Disk Cleanup's Windows Update Cleanup weeds through the WinSxS folder and eliminates unnecessary files. Learn how to use the feature in Windows 7 and 8.x.

 

harddiskiStock_000011603110_011814.jpg
 Image: iStock/kynny
 

Disk Cleanup's new feature called Windows Update Cleanup is standard in Windows 8 and Windows 8.1 and was added to Windows 7 by an update that was made available in October 2013. The Windows Update Cleanup feature is designed to help you to regain valuable hard disk space by removing bits and pieces of old Windows updates that are no longer needed.

I'll take a closer look at the Disk Cleanup tool and then focus on the new Windows Update Cleanup feature. As I do, I'll give you a little background on the Windows update leftovers that this tool is designed to eliminate.

Note: Disk Cleanup and the Windows Update Cleanup feature works the same in Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 8.1. This article applies to all of those Windows versions, though all of the example screen shots are from a Windows 8 system.

The WinSxS folder

If you used the Windows operating system back in the Windows 9x days, you're familiar with the term DLL Hell. This situation arose when you installed different programs that included updated versions of Dynamic Link Library (DLL) files with the same name as files already on the system. These duplicate files would wreak havoc with applications and the operating system. For example, an application would look for a specific version of a DLL file, but find a newer version that was recently updated by another program. Since the version was different, the application would act strangely or crash altogether.

By the time Windows Vista was introduced, Microsoft solved the problem by creating a new technology called componentization, which uses a folder called the WinSxS folder that allows the operating system to store and keep track of all kinds of operating system files (DLLs included) with the same name but different versions. WinSxS is short for Windows Side-by-Side and refers to using files with the same name but with different version numbers at the same time in the operating system.

As things evolved, the WinSxS folder also became the perfect place to store files added to the operating system by Windows Update. Microsoft releases a multitude of updates every month to keep up with bugs, new applications, and security problems (just to name a few of the reasons for the regular updates). In order to make sure the updates don't cause compatibility problems, all kinds of duplicate files get stored in the WinSxS folder so that everything can continue to function correctly. Furthermore, many Windows updates are designed such that if they do cause unanticipated compatibility problems, they can be uninstalled, and the files can be reverted back to a previous state.

While this is a pretty simplified description of the WinSxS folder, the general idea I want to convey is the WinSxS folder can grow so large that it takes up a good chunk of hard disk space. The problem gets compounded by the fact that, because the WinSxS folder is used to store so many files, really old files or files that are no longer necessary can still be taking up hard disk space.

For instance, Figure A shows the WinSxS folder on a system that began as a Windows 7 system and then upgraded to Windows 8. The WinSxS folder on this system contains 58,739 files and takes up 6.89 GB of hard disk space. (In comparison, one of my Windows 7 systems has 54,524 files and is using up 11.1 GB of hard disk space.)

Figure A

WinUpdateCleanupFigA_011614.png
The WinSxS folder can be quite large. (Click to view a larger version of the image.)

If you want more technical detail about the origin of componentization and the WinSxS folder, you can read this 2008 post from the Ask the Core Team blog on the Microsoft TechNet site.

The Disk Cleanup tool

The Disk Cleanup tool has been around for quite some time and is designed to allow you to easily clean out old and unnecessary files that can clog up your hard disk; it's the perfect place for Microsoft to add the new Windows Update Cleanup feature, which is designed to weed through the WinSxS folder and eliminate waste. Rather than just jumping straight into the Windows Update Cleanup feature, let's take a closer look at the Disk Cleanup tool as a whole and then delve into the new feature.

To launch the Disk Cleanup tool, access the Start Menu or the Start Screen and type Disk Cleanup. Once you launch Disk Cleanup, if you have more than one hard disk in your system, you'll be prompted to select drive C. Disk Cleanup will begin to analyze the files on your hard disk to determine what can be safely removed (Figure B).

Figure B

WinUpdateCleanupFigB_011614.png
When you launch the Disk Cleanup tool, it will calculate how much space you'll be able to free up.

Once the disk space analysis is complete, you'll see the main Disk Cleanup interface (Figure C), which essentially contains a list of all the categories or locations containing unnecessary files on your hard disk that can be removed. Adjacent to each category you'll see the size of the unnecessary files as well as a check box that allows you to specify that you want to remove those files. Beneath the list is a number indicating the total amount of disk space that you'll gain by removing the selected files. Immediately below the list is the description panel, which will provide you with more details about the category that is currently selected. The categories you see in the list will depend on what the Disk Cleanup tool found on your hard disk. 

Figure C

WinUpdateCleanupFigC_011614.png
The main feature of the Disk Cleanup interface is the Files To Delete scrolling list.

Table A: The most common categories listed in the Disk Cleanup tool.

CategoryDescription
Download Program Files

Downloaded Program Files are ActiveX controls and Java applets downloaded automatically from the Internet with you view certain pages. They are temporarily stored in the Downloaded Program Files folder on your hard disk.

Temporary Internet Files

The Temporary Internet Files folder contains webpages stored on your hard disk for quick viewing. Your personalized settings for webpages will be left intact.

Offline webpages

Offline pages are webpages that are stored on your computer so you can view them without being connected to the Internet. If you delete these pages now, you can still view your favorites offline later by synchronizing then. Your personalized settings for webpages will be left intact.

Game News Files

(Windows 7 only)
The Game News Files facilitate delivery of RSS feeds to your Game Library.

Game Statistics Files

(Windows 7 only)
The Game Statistics Files are created to aid maintenance of various game statistics.

Debug Dump Files

Files created by Windows.

Recycle Bin

The Recycle Bin contains files you have deleted from your computer. 

Setup Log files

Files created by Windows.
System error memory dump files
Remove system error memory dump files.
System error minidump files
Remove system error minidump files.

Temporary files

Programs sometimes stores temporary information in the TEMP folder. Before a program closes, it usually deleted this information. You can safely delete temporary files that have not been modified in over a week.

Thumbnails

Windows keeps a copy of all your picture, video, and document thumbnails so they can be displayed quickly when you open a folder. If you delete these thumbnails, they will be automatically recreated as needed.

User file history

Windows stores file versions temporarily on this disk before copying them to the designated File History disk. If you delete these files, you will lose some file history.

Per user archived Windows Error Report

Files used for error reporting and solution checking.

Per user queued Windows Error Report

Files used for error reporting and solution checking.

System archived Windows Error Report

Files used for error reporting and solution checking.
System queued Windows Error Report
Files used for error reporting and solution checking.


As you select the various categories in the list, a View Files button may appear. If it does, you can click it to launch a separate Windows/File Explorer window targeted on the location and showing you all the unnecessary files stored there. Keep in mind that the View Files button is not available for all of the categories.

The Windows Update Cleanup feature

If you refer back to Figure C, you'll see that adjacent to the View Files button is a button titled Clean Up System Files. You'll notice this button is flagged with the User Account Control (UAC) icon. Depending on your UAC setting, you may see a UAC prompt when you select that button. The Clean Up System Files button provides you with access to the Windows Update Cleanup feature.

When you select the Clean Up System Files button, Disk Cleanup will again display the screen shown in Figure B as it analyzes additional locations on your hard disk to determine what can be safely removed. When the main Disk Cleanup interface returns, you'll find that a new category called Windows Update Cleanup appears in the list (Figure D). In addition, you may find several other new categories. 

Figure D

WinUpdateCleanupFigD_011614.png
Windows Update Cleanup appears in the Disk Cleanup list.

Table B: Categories that appear in Disk Cleanup when you select the Clean up system files button.

CategoryDescription
Windows Update Cleanup

Windows keeps copies of all installed updates from Windows Update, even after installing newer versions of updates that are no longer needed and taking up space. (You might need to restart your computer.)


Device driver packages

Windows keeps copies of all previously installed device driver packages from Windows Update and other sources even after installing newer versions of drivers. This task will remove older versions of drivers that are no longer needed. The most current version of each driver package will be kept.
Windows Defender
Non critical files used by Windows Defender
Windows upgrade log files
Windows upgrade log files contain information that can help identify and troubleshoot problems that occur during Windows installation, upgrade, or servicing. Deleting these files can make it difficult to troubleshoot installation issues.
Service Pack Backup Files
Windows saves old versions of files that have been updated by a service pack. If you delete the files, you won't be able to uninstall the service pack later.


Windows Update Cleanup only appears in the list when the Disk Cleanup wizard detects Windows updates that you don't need on your system. For example, when I ran Disk Cleanup's Windows Update Cleanup feature on a Windows 8.1 system that had recently been updated from Windows 8 to 8.1, the Windows Update Cleanup category did not appear in Disk Cleanup because everything had recently been cleaned up by the Windows 8.1 update.

When you click OK, Disk Cleanup will prompt you to confirm that you want to permanently delete the selected files (Figure E).

Figure E

WinUpdateCleanupFigE_011614.png
Disk Cleanup will prompt you to confirm the permanent delete operation.

Disk Cleanup will then go to work cleaning up all the files in the categories that you selected, including the Windows Update files (Figure F).

Figure F

WinUpdateCleanupFigF_011614.png
Disk Cleanup will remove any unnecessary Windows Update files.

The end result

You'll want to restart your system once Disk Cleanup completes its operation. When your system restarts, any unnecessary Windows Update files will be completely removed. As you survey the results, keep in mind that the Windows Update Cleanup feature will only remove files that it finds are no longer needed by the system, so you may find that a lot of files have been removed from your system or you may find that very few files have been removed from your system.

For example, after running the Windows Update Cleanup feature on my Windows 8 system, the number of files only dropped from 58,739 to 58,130 and the size of the WinSxS folder only dropped from 6.89 GB to 6.83 GB -- a very small gain. However, on my Windows 7 system, the number of files dropped from 54,524 to 47,454, and the size of the WinSxS folder dropped from 11.1 GB to 7.86 GB -- a modest gain of 3.24 GB of hard disk space.

What's your take?

Have you used Disk Cleanup's new Windows Update Cleanup feature in Windows 7 or 8.x? If so, what kind of disk savings did you encounter?

If you have comments or information to share about this topic, please drop by the TechRepublic forums and let us hear from you.

 

About

Greg Shultz is a freelance Technical Writer. Previously, he has worked as Documentation Specialist in the software industry, a Technical Support Specialist in educational industry, and a Technical Journalist in the computer publishing industry.

31 comments
PhilBlit
PhilBlit

4.2 GB regained at work on Win7 Enterprise. Thanks!

bigclown187
bigclown187

On a fresh copy of Windows 8 I restarted my PC and preceded to wait about an hour for it to install 95 updates.  Why in gods name does it take so long?

kkspears
kkspears

I did this clean up and regret it lol. All of my thumbnails are gone. Can I recover them? It says Thumbnails

Windows keeps a copy of all your picture, video, and document thumbnails so they can be displayed quickly when you open a folder. If you delete these thumbnails, they will be automatically recreated as needed. How do I get them back???
matza55
matza55

I have a laptop with windows 8, updated to win 8.1. Then I made a usb recovery-unit, suddenly a partition with 25 gb appear. Fantastic! My laptop has a 128 gb ssd-drive, so every gb is good!

alizacarvor
alizacarvor

Thank You Greg For sharing nice information. To get PC on well performance i always taking care like clean history, cookies, disk clean up also remove unwanted software. The desktop clean up is also helpful to for system performance.

Thank You

Fix My Computer Dude

goedpaul
goedpaul

Well, I took a different approach, since my WinSxS directory is over 17.6GB.

I replaced my old 750GB C drive with a 2TB 7200rpm SATA III drive that improved overall performance without having to clean up the update files :) Boots faster, too.

Sunny Puddle
Sunny Puddle

Excellent article- very well written and informative.  I followed the instructions and started with 4.32 GB in that folder and ended with 1.54 MB - quite a dramatic difference.  With only an 80 GB SSD system drive, I needed that space!  Caution - as noted in an earlier posting - after the reboot be prepared to wait about 30 minutes and a couple of automatic restarts to let it finish.  Allow about 45 minutes for this.

ronfdunn
ronfdunn

I checked and MS says I have this update installed but the "Windows Update Cleanup" doesn't appear on the  Disk Cleanup's  popup. Must not have any updates to remove. 

chapman_henry
chapman_henry

Once again, Greg has proven he is a Windows genius who writes with limpid clarity. Thanks, Greg. 

tkensc1
tkensc1

Warning: For Windows 7 users. Using Disk Cleanup on 2 of my Win 7 PCs resulted in the following:


After the "Cleanup: was done, nothing much changed, but when I restarted the PC's, they took an exceptionally long time to shut down (about 5 minutes each), then restarted and displayed the "Configuring Windows Updates- Do Not Turn Off Your Computer" message. During this time period, about 10 minutes, the PC's both rebooted automatically, then restarted and went into a long "Cleaning Up: phase with the " Do Not Turn Off Your Computer" message for about another 10 minutes before finally getting to the login window at last. If you have mission critical Win 7 computers or servers, run this only during non-mission critical time periods. I would allow a minimum of 30-45 minutes for the process to unfold, perhaps longer would be safer.

N4AOF
N4AOF

Unfortunately the so-called cleanup tool (like much of Windoze) assumes that it is always much smarter than the user.  "The Windows Update Cleanup option is available only when the Disk Cleanup wizard detects Windows updates that you do not need on the computer."  Which apparently means that it never shows up because obviously Microsoft Knows Best and they would never have given you any update that you didn't need -- even when your update history shows several updates that were only "Recommended" or even "Optional" including updates for hardware that you may or may not still have.

keimanzero
keimanzero

Sounds risky but I might check it out. Not really very usedul if you access a lot of foreign sites like I do with anime and Japanese genre. I also need to keep my accept all cookies alive at all times as well as accepting all pop ups and ads beecause I do online surveys and am self employed using my home PC to this end. For the average 'stumbler' as I call them who like to tweak with stuff they don't understand I'd advise against screwing around too much with any updates cleanup of their 'Henrietta' or PC. For the diehard 'techie geeks' this will be Valhalla to them! Of course if we get into a bind we can always Ask Leo or come to TR for help I suppose so long as we don't double delete anything for good! Later- keimanzero Scion of Anime Campbelltown/Palmyra PA USA                 'Hawks' over 'Broncs' by a FG on Groundhog Day in Jersey!

us000483
us000483

Ok, I just ran disk cleanup on my Win 7 machine and now have more files than bfr.  11.376GB vs 11.372GB and files increased by one to 50,093.  The estimate was for 3.4GB reduction, but chking properties bfr/aftr on WinSxS yielded the abv unexpected results...and ideas why?

krr711
krr711

When I typed in the Disc Cleanup it took me to the Disc Management Menu. I have no idea why but I could not locate the Disc Cleanup by this method.

maj37
maj37

First of all good article with some good info, thanks.

Now one of my pet peeves.  Why are so many people that right these articles so enamored with the search box for starting applications and utilities on their Windows computers?  I realize you have switched to Win 8 and so unless you have put a third party start utility on then the start menus are missing but this has been going on long before Windows 8 even came out.  Why not tell us where the utility is instead of just the name or partial name you search for, why even have the menus if you don't use them?  I also realize that on this forum most of the people reading it probably know Windows well enough to know where the disk cleanup utility is or can find it is they don't, but still you told us how to find it with the dumb search.

BTW the label dumb search is obviously my opinion, I hate starting applications and utilities that way and I suspect a lot of other folks do also otherwise there would not have been so much complaining about the loss of the start menus in Win 8.

shc
shc

Is there a tool like this available for Server 2008 R2 or 2012? It would be really useful on servers when the C drive is running out of space.

bryan
bryan

Thanks the article was a bit of good advice. I recovered 7.6GB from a Win 7 Pro laptop and 2.35GB from my Win 7 Pro desktop. I was surprised just how much stuff was redundant in the WinSxS folder.

dr156
dr156

Good Article. I think I will use it in the A+ Class I teach.

mail
mail

andrew.glenda: Useful tip, thanks

PCcritic
PCcritic

"If you used the Windows operating system back in the Windows 9.x days"

 When was this?  By my reckoning we are just starting the Windows 8.x days.

andrew.glenda
andrew.glenda

Thanks Greg I use Glary Utilities for home use does all that and a lot more. Plus it's free.

I only have a small SSD 128GB HDD and doing this sort of clean up is essential 

bigclown187
bigclown187

@kkspears  

Make sure you or the OS did not disable thumbnails in explorer.


Open Computer then from the menu click View -> Options.  Go to the View tab.  Make sure the first box is unchecked (Always show icons, never thumbnails).

bigclown187
bigclown187

@matza55  

Laptops usually don't come with an OS recovery disc.  That may be a recovery partition that you would boot from to reinstall windows.

bigclown187
bigclown187

@ronfdunn  

I didn't see it at first but then discovered you have to click the button that says "Clean up system files" and the tool will restart itself.

khiatt
khiatt

I think you missed the point... It doesn't remove updates that were unnecessary, it removes files that were superseded by newer versions but left behind for potential compatibility reasons. If you chose to install an update, the system cleanup will not consider it unnecessary and remove it.

N4AOF
N4AOF

@krr711 If you want to run Disk Cleanup from the Search method, you need to type CLEANMGR which is the filename for the Disk Cleanup program.   It is easier to get it from the System Tools folder on the start menu, or by right clicking on the disk drive icon in Windows Explorer.

alawishis
alawishis

@shc I agree this would be very helpful for the windows server versions.  A winsxs cleanup utility is long overdue especially on shared servers. 

grh
grh

@PCcriticWindows 95 and Windows 98; come on surely you knew that.

jasonbelt
jasonbelt

@grh:  But then the notation should have been written as Windows 9x to represent Windows ninety something.  NOT as 9.x (nine dot ex) as this represents Windows version 9 something.  Well spotted @PCcritic.

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