IT Employment

Six lines your boss should never cross

A list of six ways you can tell if your boss has crossed the line of professional behavior.

The employment experts at Allison & Taylor have offered some great tips for knowing whether your boss has crossed the line of professional behavior. 

According to Allison & Taylor, your boss is crossing the line if he or she:

1. Makes references to your salary in front of other staff. This is private and confidential information, not public knowledge. Other employees don't need to know what you're being paid, and it's true regardless of the type of comment that's made. Whether the boss is saying, "I don't pay you enough" or "I pay you too much," this type of comment will lead to resentment among staff members. Broadcasting your earnings undermines your position with the rest of the staff. They'll either think you're willing to work for peanuts, ruining their chances of earning more, or think that you're overpaid.

2. Reprimands you in front of other employees. This is a form of bullying, and it's never acceptable. While you may have made a mistake or error that deserves discussion, a good employer will handle this professionally -- and in private. A good boss should never denigrate your skills, either, with comments like, "This job is so easy, anyone could do it."

3. Has unreasonable expectations.
Managers need to communicate their expectations for work performance clearly, assist employees when needed, and set reasonable deadlines for projects. This one can be tricky... at times every employee has probably felt that he or she has been dealt an impossible task. But if you're consistently receiving unreasonable demands, you need to speak up. It could be a communication issue; perhaps something as simple as unclear directions are bogging you down. Or it could be a case of micromanagement (in which case, you were hired because the boss felt you were qualified to do your job, and it's fine to remind him or her to let you do it). Just be sure you address it in a courteous and nonconfrontational manner.

4. Shares too many personal details.
This is a work situation, not the therapist's couch. A good boss shouldn't share problems or inappropriate personal details. If you find the conversation often veers in this direction, lead the way by being very brief in your responses and then change the subject back to business. And don't bring your own problems to the office.

5. Makes inappropriate references.
Any comment that makes you squirm is one that shouldn't have been made in the office. This includes water cooler jokes, emails, or comments about your physical appearance. Include in this category any type of implication that the boss is interested in a relationship of a personal nature, even if it's not something you're entirely opposed to. Workplace romances are NEVER a good idea, and it's beyond unprofessional to even make the suggestion. All these things are a sexual harassment lawsuit waiting to happen.

6. Implies that sex, race, age, sexual orientation, or religion is a factor in work performance.
None of these things have anything to do with your ability to do the job you were hired to do. The suggestion that it might is not only unfair, it's discriminatory. Address any such implication immediately.

If you find that you're experiencing one or more of these problems with regularity, you need to speak to your boss about your discomfort. This isn't always an easy thing to do, but it's necessary to maintain a professional working relationship. Keep in mind that he or she may not even be aware that it is bothering you. The key is to open up a dialogue that can deal with the issues.

Approach your boss in a free, calm moment, and let him or her know that you feel there are some issues that need to be addressed. Then calmly discuss the issues in an open and honest manner. And always keep in mind that having respect for yourself and your needs will allow the boss to see you're there to do your best work. If discussing with your boss does not change things for the better, then consider going up the chain of command or to HR for help.

About

Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

126 comments
sandy996
sandy996

I am a female lawn technician. On different occasion my manager keeps referring to me as he when talking to my customers or calling me a man in front of my coworkers. is there something i cal do about this?

xjer
xjer

I work in a small company. I make $9/hr. My boss belittles my pay by constantly calling me a broke college student and mentions that my check will go to gas money anyway when she tries to force me to eat lunch with her. She makes me go from my office to her office just to plug something in. She jokes around about being surrounded by gayness. I'm gay and I'm not affected by it but come now... She reprimands me not only in front of my coworkers but also in front the people that buy our services. Deadlines are constantly thrown at me when she neglects them with the tasks briefly explained to me. When I'm obviously swamped by them, she simply sits in her office and continues with her own tasks.

I am an efficient worker and have been patient with her behavior. I am in charge of many tasks such as administrating our website. If I leave, they'll surely slow down especially with the business quickly growing.

But anyway, reading this made me realize how much of a crappy work environment I work in... Off to job hunt again!

Heie
Heie

If an employee feels they are being treated improperly, or exposed to undesirable behavior remember YOU have a perfect solution.....QUIT!   Or another way to see it is FIRE YOUR BOSS. 

Heie
Heie

Today's Special.... It seems that everything one does to another is bullying. To me reprimanding a worker for coming back from lunch late is not bullying. To me reprimanding a group for horseplay or social gathering during work is not bullying. Doing this in front of other workers sends everyone a message.

I think the whole population is getting oversensitive to many things. To some of these I would say "grow up!"

By the way, did you notice the sexest advertising for learning Spanish at the bottom of your website? Would that be a 5 or a 6?

vandalii
vandalii

#2 & #5 are judgements call...by upper mgmt + HR.  Bullying and inappropriate language by certain people happens all the time where I work...but those certain people also produce results for their bosses so the polite shrug is all we ever expect for these miscreants.

Remember, HR number one purpose to protect the company from you, and may help you so long as it doesn't compromise their #1 purpose.  If the company deems the bullier to be of greater value than the individual contributor/sub-manager, and so long as there isn't a serious legal case that could be made against the company, it's laissez-faire.  Seen it too often to believe otherwise.

tvmuzik
tvmuzik

About #4 (Shares too many personal details): I work at a restaurant, and my employer (the owner) DRINKS for a living, as in Serious drinking problem. He's not married, so obviously he doesn't have any domestic problems at home in his personal life.  He recently sold his other restaurant business, and he acts as though he's a retired lottery millionaire. He goes bar-hopping throughout the week, and whenever he sees me he's under the influence of alcohol and always complimenting me with "you're the best guy I ever hired!" (I'm a dishwasher, fer chris' sakes!).  I've been employed by him over a year thus far and still have not gotten a raise; no one on my staff has gotten any raises (let alone a Christmas bonus).  I never think to ask him for a raise, because I know what his excuse will be: he'll cry "poverty" while laughing to the bank every day and drinking on a binge like he's "on vacation" while I struggle to make ends meet. 

I finally got tired of hearing the azzkizzing talk, and now I tell him in private "speak to me when you're sober".  I seriously do not tolerate alcoholism, drunks, anything of that sort, especially in the work place.  I've started sending out resumes for my next job.  I do not tolerate employers getting personal with me in any way shape or form in the slightest... not even a drunk employer. I've known my boss this way since the first day he hired me, and I can't tolerate it any longer.  I'm at work busting my rump for a living, seeing him stop in for drinks and staggering to other bars in the neighborhood, it makes me feel depressed... this is Not the way I wanna move up in the world.  My boss' drinking problem shouldn't have anything to do with me, but it still affects me when he comes in to check up on us and he's had drinks.

ChallengerTech
ChallengerTech

So how much did Allison & Taylor pay Toni Bowers to hawk their employment related legal services under the guise of an article? Shameless promotion of political correctness ambulance chasers!

miauwington
miauwington

Strongly disagree with #4 : We spend more time in the office than with family members. It's only human to share something personal every once in a while. It just requires a minimum of social awareness to know the time and place for it. But you can't outlaw emotion from the workplace.

GDMPC
GDMPC

Currently under situation #4.


Although a decent enough person, he continuously crosses the TMI "too much information" line.

Griping about company policy when things do not go as he expects, and giving me negative commentary regarding co-workers and upper management.

Also carrying on about personal issues at home, and becoming extremely dependent on me to make critical decisions in day to day operations.

It's now at the point where I do most of the critical decision making, and he simply implements it .


Fortunately I don't easily crumble under pressure, and have been nice enough not to sabotage the guy.

JA12
JA12

With regards to #3. In my experience this is usually a precursor to manufacturing a "legitimate" reason for "letting you go". Especially if it's a new behaviour.  Here in Ireland the probationary period is 12 months and the "Unreasonable expectations" usually start at around 9 months and they get ramped up if you manage to cope and deliver anyway.  There's not much you can do about this as the behaviour is deliberate and has an end expectation. No amount of reasonable discussion has any effect at all.

Bill Wilson
Bill Wilson

HMM! Whilst I agree with much of this its a naive view of life (Yes life not work).  Political correctness  is one of the reasons that there is so much angst & stress in our lives today and far from protecting the employee is actually ruining the enjoyment of the workplace.

In my opinion it stems from the public sector and many people getting up each day looking for something to be offended by.

We need to bear in mind that employers are just people with the same follies as the employee with the difference that the employer in most cases is the one who will loose out for any mistakes whereas the employee will get paid whatever.

1. If an employee is unruly or is publicly criticising the employer  it is sometimes appropriate to put them down in front of other employees. It sends a message to the rest of the work force who are usually just as fed up with the situation. The employer gets it off their chest and its over and done with rather than carrying resentment which otherwise could be vented on another. 

2. Always give praise in public where its due. One employee who we had not had the best of relationships with had left the company and wanted to return. When asked why the reply was " I don't get b****cked* any more, nor do I get praised, with you if I screwed up it was over and done with in a few minutes and we moved on"

3. Workplace romances - YEP great idea and I speak after over 40 years together. Today my wife Sandra is the MD and I am the technical director.  If two people are attracted then there is no difference work or play.

4. With the above in mind we have only once ever had an issue which was one not of our own making but in a TUPE situation. All the proper documentation and systems were in place we took professional advice, but it makes no difference the case has to be heard, which with lawyers fees as they are it costs an arm and a leg. We tried all the proper routes and in the end sat down and settled it one to one. 

Forget the lawyers sort it out between yourselves this will benefit both sides.

Whilst I am sure there are thing we could improve on I believe we have a happy and stable workforce, many have been with us over 10 years and some over 25

5. I accept that there are some extreme cases but if we insist on going down this incredibly stupid political correctnesses the situation will solve itself.

* no one will employ anybody - many one man bands today would like to but wont

*there will be no tax revenue

*no public sector 

*no jobs, bosses or employees 

Just think about it and lets get reasonable common sense back into the workplace, be kind and considerate to each other and enjoy our working lives, or get another career, neither the employer nor employee is being forced to stay. 

I believe the modern anachronism is FIFO


kitkimes41
kitkimes41

I think you missed an important one which should replace one of these or be added to the list.

A boss should NEVER, NEVER, NEVER ask an employee or prospective employee for their social network logins and passwords.  This is crossing the line way too far.

RMSx32767
RMSx32767

Most intellectually and emotionally mature persons call tell, without a list, which behavior has crossed the line. The problem is that the line-crosser sees nothing wrong with behaving like an ar$ehole.

dogknees
dogknees

I've been aware of what salaries are paid to my workmates for years, including not just my department but everyone right through to the managing director. What I haven't done is allow it to affect what I think of the people concerned or how I treat them.

It's common in professional life to have information that you may only use in certain ways or at certain times. What you know and what you do with that knowledge aren't the same thing, just like what you want to do and what you actually do aren't. 

rationalanarchist
rationalanarchist

 What a boring workplace we are encouraging and totally against all human nature and instinct.

Whilst I agree with some of the sentiment we have gone overboard with political correctness.
Having run a small company for nearly 50 years ALL of our staff agree that we do not want political correctness. Most have been employed for many years and during independent assessments state that  they enjoy the relaxed atmosphere. 

I remember many years ago an employee who had left applying to rejoin, when asked why he replied "I don't get Bo***ed any more, nor do I get praised. When I screw up you give me a roasting but then its all done and dusted and we move on"

Equally they are at liberty to complain if anything offends.

I happened to be visiting a national chain of retailers yesterday and heard banter between two employees (male and female, black and white) which contravened most of the above. When I said something about it the reaction was "We have a happy workplace and have no time for tiptoeing round each other. When people join us they know the score we operate a FIFO system". This was from the employees not the boss. (F.I.F.O. fit in or F off)

As the customer I found the experience refreshing and will definitely give them my custom in future.

 If we within our company ever get to the extent of some of the views expressed above I would no longer enjoy the environment and would close the company.

Its a pity those inventing these rules have nothing productive to do to help the country out of its current situation.

David_Brown
David_Brown

I completely agree with this statement. I knocked up the Bosses secretary who was the CIO of a Major Telco where i live and it almost destroyed my career when the relationship went south

kgross
kgross

Being a government employee, the Right to Know laws require public disclosure of a great deal of personal information, including salary.

gevander
gevander

It should have said that the FIRST reprimand should always be in private. But a *private* reprimand for a *public* act can be followed up with a *public* reprimand for the *same* act if it is within the team. For acts in front of other teams or higher levels of management, reprimands should always be private.

SJMcD
SJMcD

Had a manager who I reported to when my boss was away, who seemed to spit the dummy whenever you told him bad news. Once when I informed him that a critical system had gone done (as you should do), his response was to kick and punch his desk and to start yelling. It didn't really help me when I then went to investigate and fix the problem.

rwhite
rwhite

Shouldn't "politics" be added to the list "sex, race, age, or religion" in item 6?

RW17
RW17

I am not disagreeing with what is written in this article, but I do suggest that you qualify your perspective on applying these rules with a healthy dose of reality! The superiors and the subordinates are all.... wait for it.... human! If you walk around with these rules and enforce them with a big stick and absolute resolution, you are a boss who simply leads by what other people write (aka - a Follower!) The recipient of these bad boss behaviours must take on some responsibility and supply a response to indicate they are not comfortable with whatever has happened. Even a "Too Much Information" comment is, if you are a person who thinks... at all, enough to suggest that the bosses comments made them felt uncomfortable. And... in today's horrificly lonely world, workplace romances are a bad idea but I can completely understand how they happen and why! If it works out for the couple... fantastic! If it doesn't... such is life! If it affects a person's work performance significantly because it didn't work out, then they will likely resolve that issue themselves by finding another place to work because of the emotional strain. Simply stated: be reasonable people... we have a metric tonne of opinions on these matters that start with "Never, ever....xxx!" but, in reality, the people around you are human and "to err is human; to not understand such errors is to be an intolerant arse!"

Alex Silva
Alex Silva

For those who think it is not a bad idea: If ANYONE in the office has to think twice before acting or speaking because there is a couple in the office, it is a BAD IDEA! Managers should be free to act without the pressure of taking care what the "loved one" will think about it (or sister, father, brother...). If it is inevitable, deal with it, but it brings additional stress and skills to the workplace that may not contribute to business strategy!

minstrelmike
minstrelmike

Sounds like a good list to avoid if you want to be a good parent too.

carolinagirl38D
carolinagirl38D

Why should pay be a secret? Even when I was the boss, I always wondered why I had to keep it a secret. Why not post it in the breakroom for all to see. Is your pay structure unfair? Are the red heads earning more that blondes? Are short people getting short changed. If some kick-ass tech is doing kick-ass work and getting rewarded for, that's as it should be. If some seat-warmer is getting overpaid, that's not right and the worker-bees have a right to know why. If I give somebody an increase in pay, I should have a reason for it and I should be able to share their accomplishments and resulting reward with everyone in the entire company. To do otherwise is to imply that your pay structure is arbitrary and unfair. Fair, open and honest - what's wrong with that?

wdnetherton
wdnetherton

Toni.......I suggest you get a government job and direct your advice to government bureaucrats who are more interested in wasting time and money than producing value. They have the most in common with you. Your pandering to an audience of victims and your advice is a perfect example of the entitlement mentality that is driving jobs overseas and killing this economy. I suggest you join the real world, start a business and start working toward a solution by apprising employees of their responsibilities rather than indulging them with their "rights". Leave your welfare state mentality to the europeans and their bankrupt economies.

bmerc
bmerc

@ChallengerTech 

Poisoning the well fallacy. The fact that the links go to some attorney's web site does not mean they are incorrect. 

Complaining about "political correctness" is a waste of time. The fact is, there are lots of good reasons NOT to treat your employees like crap, and getting sued is only one of them. Another is having better morale. Another is having lower turnover. Another is not having an employee go berserk and spray your brains over a wall with a shotgun. Avoiding getting sued is just the frosting on the cake. 

 

 

Mind the Gap
Mind the Gap

@ChallengerTech Most complaints against "political correctness" are usually defensive -- the person crying "political correctness" doesn't want lose their sense of entitlement or he doesn't want repercussions for being disrespectful, selfish, or just insensitive. 

If you see yourself somewhere in the 6 examples above, then maybe you might be a jerk.  Maybe instead of attacking the messenger, you could try to learn and grow to be a better person. It might give you richer relationships and make your business more efficient and more productive, as well. 

DuckAndCower
DuckAndCower

@ChallengerTech Yeah, TechRepublic seems to be really shady and low-quality lately. I hadn't even noticed that all the links went to some ambulance chaser's website.

vandalii
vandalii

@JA12 Agree.  You will also notice that "policy" such as attendance, arrival/depature times get enforced and recorded only when there is a need for legal proof the departure was not arbitrary.  Had it happen some years back when reductions were happening.  Not an engineer in the building came in before 9AM on a regular basis, but policy was in by 8:30AM.  Became part of the written warning for me when it was time to squeeze me out.  Couldn't go after my engineering performance -- too subjective (and frankly, was too productive to prove incompetence).

Policy is enforced to create document-able and legally-defensible opportunities to eliminate an employee, by and large.  Yes, there are jerks out there that do 1-6 and should be fired.  Most of the time, 1-6 are used as a squeeze play.

mattcoker
mattcoker

@Bill Wilson  your comments are completely on point., reading the article, one would imagine a more appropriate title would be "the work place sociopath's handbook. The usual source of employee disconnect and ready prelude to outright disloyalty is this modern day drive to turn employees to Drones who are not allowed to engage in any social interaction in the work place.

We should always remember that work is part of life other wise it wouldn't be worth doing.

Kieron Seymour-Howell
Kieron Seymour-Howell

@kitkimes41 Correct.  The employer only needs to be concerned with the "public" image of anyone's profile online.

If the employer can see something inappropriate from the public perspective, then arrange a meeting to discuss the issue, seek a solution, and/or fire the person if they insist on publishing harmful or defaming information or sensitive company data.

Employers MUST respect privacy laws, or better start a slush fund for the inevitable legal fees now.

Mind the Gap
Mind the Gap

@rationalanarchist

 I just don't see what is so unreasonable about the list. Just treat people decent. Maybe you don't realize how bad it is out there for some employees (because you would't imagine crossing some of these lines). 

I wonder though because your tone seems to imply that you are one of those "You should just be happy if you have a job" types that use that as an excuse to abuse people. For example, you say that implementing the list would mean you "no longer enjoyed the environment and would close the company. "  Does that mean if you had to quit belittling and yelling even cursing at workers? (#2)

So are you saying that you'd rather close down than stop putting your hands on the women you work with, or to quit talking to their boobs or to quit making those sick sexual innuendos? (#5)  Is there ever a time when you think it is okay for employees to draw the line? Who sets the line? 


NickNielsen
NickNielsen moderator

You shouldn't have been poking in fun what she was going to take seriously! :p

Kieron Seymour-Howell
Kieron Seymour-Howell

@kgrossThere is nothing wrong with people knowing facts, but the problem arises when they are used against someone to pressure and gain unfair advantage.  However, that being said, the government also does this to promote distrust and competition amongst it employees so that they are easier to control.

Many government offices encourage employees to contractually bid against each other for their jobs and positions.  This creates an air of tension and mistrust that the types of people who seek power like.  The atmosphere that real leaders recognize as productive and efficient you will rarely find in government.

techaaa10
techaaa10

waited for the temper tantrum to be over and said: "Are you done now? Can we move on to solving the problem?"

Cylon Model 12
Cylon Model 12

Political affiliation, gender orientation, sexual preference, sex, race, age, religion, looks; the list could become so long as to ensure that everyone everywhere at some point will break that rule. I think treating each other professionally within the workplace. Maybe I have had great luck with where I have worked and the bosses I have had. Or maybe I dreamed that I did to make my memories nicer.

Kieron Seymour-Howell
Kieron Seymour-Howell

@minstrelmikeMany sensible behavioural traits apply equally to personal relationships and parenting.  Good conduct is applicable everywhere and not expressly confined to business or personal situations.

techaaa10
techaaa10

For number 2 - I know as a child I was reprimanded in public. That is sometimes needed for children. They have not developed enough to be able to associate something they did 20 or 30 minutes ago with the punishment they are receiving. The punishment needs to be immediate so they can associate the action with the response. 3 - I thought all my parents expectations were unreasonable. Who gets to judge? 4 - My parents did not share a lot of personal details, and I am a very private person. Perhaps too much so. I wonder if my parents had been a little more open if I would be too. 5 - My parents often made comments that 'made me squirm', that is probably a good thing. Parent's need to know and understand what their kids are doing, (for them it was a one way street though). They can't do that if they don't have some uncomfortable conversations. 6 - I should certainly hope that would NEVER be an issue for a child. I know it happens but really with very a few exceptions a child (anyone in fact) can do almost anything they set their minds too, regardless of race sex...

rutu_1
rutu_1

@carolinagirl38D Not all undisclosed information = unfair practices. I started a company and a programmer found out what my company is doing and came to me to tell me what he could do for my company.  He also stated the salary he wanted.  I agreed with him and paid him his salary and it has been a great investment.  Business grew and he said he needed help.  We interviewed 15 candidates and liked one particular programmer.  She had 3 other offers and we decided to offer her more money so that she can choose to work with us.  She does the same thing as my other programmers and earns more money because we needed her when we needed her and chose to pay more for what we want when we wanted.  Is that fair?  Should I now start posting salaries and explaining each circumstance as to why salaries differ to all my other programmers? Should I increase all 20 programmer salaries because of this circumstance?  These situations in complex organizations are pretty common.

veseloiu
veseloiu

Spot on, Caro9lina girl38D    Absolutely right! that's how it should be  but we are swamped in confidentiality clauses and data protection which in fact do not protect the individuals as such but rahtyer help hide abuses against them, such as unfair wages  unfair treatment, unfair dismissal as wellas favouring incompetent "seat-warmers" for some personal reasons.

In othe rcountries there is far less secrecy,  hardly any PC, open banter between adults (if you cannot take somefriendly banter are you qualified to be  the company's interface with customers?) and nobody bats an eyelid about office romance.

As long as people do the job well, get paid for it fairly, are treated fairly and people are generally happy, then many of those "don't"s donot have their place  in teh workplace

Kieron Seymour-Howell
Kieron Seymour-Howell

Why?  Simple.  People are emotional, immature and petty.  Most people lack common sense and logic and survive on luck and ignorance.  Knowledge is power.  If you give the knowledge to people who have low morals they will use it for their advantage.  People cannot justify why or how they do things generally, because they do not even know this for themselves.  How many peers do you know who are motivated by very immature and shallow reasoning?

Yes, it is god to know the truth and facts, but those facts can be used to pressure and gain advantages over others.  Why?  Because generally the ones who are able to be controlled and will manipulate others, outnumber the mature ones who are just working and focusing on doing their job.

Kieron Seymour-Howell
Kieron Seymour-Howell

@carolinagirl38D It all depends upon the company.  Some times keeping things secret is to protect, and other times it is to control and manipulate.  Also, the reverse can be true also.

Generally, if something is a fact, then it is better to know, and move on and deal with it.  If the company has logical procedure and reasoning, there will be nothing wrong with facts being known.


techaaa10
techaaa10

Why should pay be secret? Well there are quite a number of reasons actually. First and foremost, the person with the same class of job that makes the least will feel they are underpaid and thus don't need to perform like the 'superstar' who at least in their eyes doesn't even do as much as they do. Then there is the 'bullying' that will start 'Look at the brown nose' or 'you only make half what I do, you must be incompetent'. So then the company may end up having no choice but to make the pay differences less. So now the best employee ends up with little or no raise, the worst employee gets a larger raise. This results in the best employee feeling slighted and either doing less work, or possibly leaving; The worst employee feels empowered, or justified in slacking off. What I make is between me and my boss, period. I am well paid and if many around me knew how much I made I would be ostracized and quite possibly sabotaged by those that make substantially less than I. Case in point MANY years ago I worked in a factory and was in a union. In one year I went from entry level to top of rate (which was normally about a 6 or 10 year process), I was made a group leader in 14 months, and thus given another raise. Most of my peers were very jealous and would try to sabotage me in any way they could. We all got along, and I am still friends with some of them, but their jealousy led them to try to reduce my productivity by sabotage, by peer pressure, some even would flat out say, your the hot shot you do it, and go sit on their hands. In most cases the person making the least will feel under-valued and therefore quit trying, while the person making the most will either be ridiculed by peers, or not be able to get another raise because of the disparate differences in pay. There are many things that go into deciding how much someone should be paid. Knowledge, practical ability, productivity, willingness to take on new tasks or go above and beyond.... However, when peers are comparing paychecks they rarely look at the entire picture they get stuck on a few numbers with dollar signs attached. What you are suggesting is a perfect world where people know their place and ability, and will reason things through. That is not the real world. By the way one of the departments where I work now has an incentive program where people get ribbons that can be used for PTO (Paid Time Off) and Gift Cards are handed out for meeting certain service goals. There is a lot of jealousy, it reminds me very much of high school. It has created clicks and made certain people say "I don't care". It has made others outcasts, never asked to go to lunch with the group. And we aren't talking about actual pay here, we are only talking out spiffs. I can only imagine how much worse it would be if it were pay rates. No thank you, how much I am paid is between me and my employer, PERIOD.

Alex Silva
Alex Silva

Remember that people get paid and promoted by their performance, a balance of their strengths and weaknesses. They also run in different careers where similar "titles" have different salaries. Would it be acceptable to a company to expose its staff? Raising "why"s and leaving each one in charge of explaining it to the others? How would one feel explaining there was no promotion to him because of his quality of reports, as per his manager feedback? O even a youngster explaining her raise because she was appointed a high potential and the "old crew" wasn't?

veseloiu
veseloiu

@wdneth  Come on, get off your high horses... We are in this together, aren't we?

;-)))))  Of course we are not, not really but rather than be adversaries let's copoperate and try to understand "the other side's" view. There are good boses and bad bosses, just as good employees and bad employees and they don't cancel each other out. SO, wdneth, if you are a boss, be a good boss, if you are an employee, be a good employee, without atacking other people's views so aggressively, just because you don't share them

Plexis
Plexis

Toni is out of touch? Really? So sexual harassment is "entitlement mentality"? We are all victims (since I am part of the audience, as are you)? This is killing the economy and driving jobs overseas? This is "welfare state mentality"? In my real world, the knowledge that if someone at my place of work touches me in a way that is not appropriate for any workplace, I do have some method of discourse. Thank goodness also, I sure do not want to work in an environment with the expectations of sexual favors and discrimination are accepted and everyone just sucks it up and puts up with it. At my company, even though our HR department says to not share compensation, we do share this information. It is very freeing to know if you are at the top, bottom, or middle of the range. It becomes something that just does not matter any longer. My bosses apprise me of my responsibilities as well as my rights as an employee. I know I need to follow the rules in our company handbook and I know that my bosses also must follow the same rules. I sure do not have a welfare state mentality nor do I have an entitlement mentality. What I do have is a mentality of professionalism and common courtesy at the workplace. From reading these comments, it seems that most others also have that mentality. Reading the information in Toni's article, I am struggling to find the overtones of victim/entitlement/welfare mentalities. I am at a loss in finding them. Sometimes, it is just nice to have someone put some guidelines down on paper so that we can comment on our experiences. I do not think that reminding people of the situations/environments that they may encounter and some information on how to handle them is necessarily pandering to victims or creating an entitlement mentality.

Kieron Seymour-Howell
Kieron Seymour-Howell

@tech This type of reaction is caused by stress, or a social problem., or a dysfunctional personality trait.  If you work for someone who has control and social issues, handling the situation in a logical and efficient manner just makes you a threat, and you will be one of the first to go when they can arrange it.

Reality means that about 4% of the people you know, are sociopaths and will not respond to the "correct" methods of dealing with things as you think.  If someone has sought a power position merely to control others and elevate themselves, anything you do that makes them feel you are strong and capable, will make you a target or a challenge.  If you find yourself in this situation, leave.  Do not waste your time, and potentially your health fighting them.  Unless you can effectively get rid of the person, don't waste your time.

SJMcD
SJMcD

That is a good way of handling it. In this case somebody told my boss what happened after he returned from his leave and I don't think he was impressed. I must have handled it the right way, as a short time later they decided to change me from a casual to a permanent employee. I ended up lasting another 12 years at the company (longer than the manager that had the temper tantrum) and only left when my position became redundant.

rutu_1
rutu_1

@tech Good points.  We are all different as individuals and even if we want to believe otherwise, we do not perform the same jobs the same.  Even though we have step by step and video/audio/text instructions of how to build a specific computer, we go through quality control because one tech will do the job differently than another tech.  Surprisingly, after building 46,000+ computers you start knowing which tech makes certain mistakes and it is a pattern because of who they are.  That is why salaries, bonuses, benefits etc are all different my friend.  It does not mean workers are horrible but it just means we are all different.  We embrace that and salaries embrace that too.

Kieron Seymour-Howell
Kieron Seymour-Howell

@PlexisPeople see what they look for.  You and wdnetherton see different things, because you are focused on different aspects of social issues and structure.  Obviously wdnetherton has some history with those issues, and as such, that is what they "saw" in the article.

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