How KGB agents were invisible spies

Dan Patterson interviews the KGB Espionage Museum's Agne Urbaityte about how agents in the field would blend in with their environment in order to spy.

How KGB agents were invisible spies Dan Patterson interviews the KGB Espionage Museum's Agne Urbaityte about how agents in the field would blend in with their environment in order to spy.

CNET and CBS News Senior Producer Dan Patterson spoke with the KGB Espionage Museum's Agne Urbaityte about how agents in the field would blend in with their environment in order to spy. The following is an edited transcript of the interview.

Dan Patterson: A KGB agent in the field. Would I be able to identify this person?

Agne Urbaityte: No way.

Dan Patterson: Bring me inside the life. Tell me why.

Agne Urbaityte: The agents who are working in the field, they were professionals. So, if you can tell that the person is spying on someone, it's not a professional, and it depends on the situation they have. The main thing, that they had to be very blended in with the people that they are around. If it's educated people, they [agents] should look like professors. They should look like very ordinary people, not very advanced or outdated, just like very ordinary people. You cannot tell anything, that they have devices on them because they were crazy devices that you cannot tell. For example, I just wear a jacket, but maybe under that jacket, there is a camera and remote controller in the pocket, and the button opens, and it takes a picture. So, there is no way you can tell that someone's spying.

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