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access point vs router

By naren.qt ·
wht is the dofference between a wireless accesspoint and wireless router??

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Differences

by bart777 In reply to access point vs router

An access point is just a device that attaches to the network and allows other devices to connect to it so that they can see and access the network.

A router does just what it says. It can route traffic and connect multiple networks. Such as your local LAN and the Internet.

Hope that helps

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Good Question

by Michael Kassner Contributor In reply to access point vs router

I hope it is OK to expand a bit on Bart's answer as many people are confused by this subject. I would like to assume that you understand the basics about each device if not this link should help:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wi-Fi

As stated in the link, a wireless router is defined as:

"Wireless routers integrate a WAP, Ethernet switch, and internal router firmware application that provides IP Routing, NAT, and DNS forwarding through an integrated WAN interface."

Where as an access point is:

"Wireless access points connects a group of wireless devices to an adjacent wired LAN. An access point is similar to a network hub, relaying data between connected wireless devices in addition to a (usually) single connected wired device, most often an ethernet hub or switch, allowing wireless devices to communicate with other wired devices."

So basically a wireless router incorporates an access point into a multi-use device. The interesting point is that the access point in a wireless router typically has fewer features and configuration possibilities. One example is that the access point portion of a most wireless routers can not be configured as an access point client or a bridge half.

One point that is usually not thought of is that in most cases a wireless router is physically located where it has the simplest access to the Internet gateway and or Ethernet connected devices. By doing that there is not sufficient regard to where the device should be located to provide the best wireless coverage for the facility. That is why whenever possible I use a wired router and access point. Locate the wired router where all of the Ethernet connections terminate and then locate the access point where it provides optimal wireless coverage.

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