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CAT5 Distance

By ccostello72 ·
I need to know the effective distance of Category 5 wire. I have two buildings that need to be networked that are 200 hundred feet apart. Is this too far? What kind of performance will the network have at this distance?

Thank you for your help.

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i think...

by TZapf In reply to CAT5 Distance

I think it's something like 383 feet...just do a search on Google or something, should be easy to find

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my openion really is

by yassine_zairi In reply to i think...

Well i've been working in IT since six years now
we don't say that we know every thing in networking but really the MAX distance of CAT5 Cables will not exceed 95meters
when you are using those
Cisco Max 100m
INTEL MAX 100m
3COM Max 85m
nortel 85m
any other ethernet SWITCHES are really will not pass 72m
i've been using all most all kinds of ethernet switches, Hubs & routers the best are
CISCO
INTEL
LUCENT
NORTEL
3COM
& forget about edimax & all those cheap things

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105 meters

by AYoshi In reply to CAT5 Distance

or, ~340 feet is a general rule of thumb. You should have no problem with 200 feet, however, you should make sure that you have good protection for your cable run.

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by jim.brown In reply to CAT5 Distance

as well as the 200feet have you also taken in to account how more you will need to get it to the building to the nearest point that you will be attaching it to

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328 feet

by gduffala In reply to

Cat 5 for ethernet, maximum distance is 328 feet hub to PC, printer etc., to include any patch cables or workstation cables.

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IMPORTANT Additional Considerations

by gduffala In reply to 328 feet

You say the "buildings" are 200 feet apart. You shouldn't just run Cat 5 copper wire betweent he two buildings. The ground potential of the two buildings may be different. This can cause problems and equipment damage during electrical storms, outages, or delivery variances from your electrical utility company. You should check with building maintenance, electrical, to see if the two buildings share the same ground. If not, you must isolate the networking equipment that is one building fromthe other building. Easiest way to do this is to run fiber between buildings if possible and have no conductive physical connection housing the cabling.

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I agree; fiber is better choice

by TomSal In reply to IMPORTANT Additional Cons ...

I must agree with gduffala. If the buildings are 200 feet apart, the much improved solution would be running fiber and not cat 5.

(You'll also not have to worry about sacrificing any bandwidth with a fiber installation, the major factor though isthat fiber installations aren't cheap)

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I agree; fiber is better choice

by TomSal In reply to IMPORTANT Additional Cons ...

I must agree with gduffala. If the buildings are 200 feet apart, the much improved solution would be running fiber and not cat 5.

(You'll also not have to worry about sacrificing any bandwidth with a fiber installation, the major factor though isthat fiber installations aren't cheap)

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Standard 100 meters for ethernet

by cjenkins In reply to

What happened to the standard 100 meters and then you subtract for any patch cables? This is both a A+, Network+ and Cisco Standard.

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Yes, You are Right

by gduffala In reply to Standard 100 meters for e ...

But a meter is a little over 39 inches. So 100 x 39 = 3900 inches. 3900 in/12(1 foot) = 325 feet. Since the question asked for footage, I wanted to give back feet. No? No matter.

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