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Certificates

By handerson ·
Digital Certificates
Identity Certificates
Attribute certificates
Public Key Infrastructure (PKI)
Certificate chain path
Certificate Trust List
Certification Authority (CA)
Registration Authority (RA)
Why is it advisable to have a stand-alone computer for a RA?
What steps are involved in obtaining a fdigital certificate from a commercial certification Authority?
Under what circumstances may an organisation decide to have ts own certification authority rather than purchasing certificates from a commercial CA and what are the implications?
What is the objective of having a certificate store?
Using Certificate snap-in, display the certificate store on your computer discuss the nature of different certificate stored in it.
Briefly describe TWO commom applications used in download of contents on the web the use digital certificates.

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by dwightp In reply to Certificates

The answer to these questions are in the text books you have for the course you are taking :-)

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by md_hashim In reply to Certificates
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by md_hashim In reply to Certificates

only 500 points?

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by chitsime2003 In reply to Certificates

Certificate Authorities
Certificates are signed by the Certificate Authority (CA) that issues them. In essence, a CA is a commonly trusted third party that is relied upon to verify the matching of public keys to identity, e-mail name, or other such information.

The benefits of certificates and CAs occur when two entities both trust the same CA. This allows them to learn each other's public key by exchanging certificates signed by that CA. Once they know each other's public key, they can use them to encrypt data and send it to one another, or to verify the signatures on documents.

A certificate shows that a public key stored in the certificate belongs to the subject of that certificate. A CA is responsible for verifying the identity of a requesting entity before issuing a certificate. The CA then signs the certificate using its private key, which is used to verify the certificate. A CA's public keys are distributed in software packages such as Web browsers and operating systems, or they can also be added manually by the user.

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by chitsime2003 In reply to Certificates

Certificate Authorities
Certificates are signed by the Certificate Authority (CA) that issues them. In essence, a CA is a commonly trusted third party that is relied upon to verify the matching of public keys to identity, e-mail name, or other such information.

The benefits of certificates and CAs occur when two entities both trust the same CA. This allows them to learn each other's public key by exchanging certificates signed by that CA. Once they know each other's public key, they can use them to encrypt data and send it to one another, or to verify the signatures on documents.

A certificate shows that a public key stored in the certificate belongs to the subject of that certificate. A CA is responsible for verifying the identity of a requesting entity before issuing a certificate. The CA then signs the certificate using its private key, which is used to verify the certificate. A CA's public keys are distributed in software packages such as Web browsers and operating systems, or they can also be added manually by the user.

A certificate is said to be trusted if you are sure the certificate really belongs to the subject shown on the certificate.
A certificate is said to be valid if it is trusted and in its valid time period and not being revoked.
The set of hardware, software, people, policies and procedures needed to create, manage, store, distribute, and revoke PKCs based on public-key cryptography

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