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I wish I knew this when I was selecting my profession...

By jkameleon ·
http://www.investors.com/editorial/IBDArticles.asp?artsec=16&issue=20060104

: "Even if you're a great programmer, you're at the mercy of the economy. In business, if there are no jobs out there, you can create your own."

: Even the brightest engineer will always work for the guy or gal with the business degree.

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LOL

by Tony Hopkinson In reply to I wish I knew this when I ...

'Even the brightest engineer'.
Sort of come's across like a talking dog taking elecution lessons. Nice to see it's not just big head techs like me suffering from ego problems.

Have you switched to business track yet JK, I've often got the impression that you want to, me I'm happy.
Not knocking you for wanting to, IT to Business guys are good to work for, they remember that it's hard to get something done yesterday.

P.S. Creativity in Business or IT or any other profession is anyone's most valuable asset as along as it's backed by the discipline to realise the dream.

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Business track?

by jkameleon In reply to LOL

> Have you switched to business track yet JK, I've often got the impression that you want to,

At the moment, I'm vexing my current employer for a training in outsourcing management. I'm sick & tired of programming. I wouldn't like to be a project manager either. To manage people of my ilk ... ****, no!

I never studied for IT, and I never wanted to work in it either. I started my career as an industrial automation engineer. When industry went south, I just followed the money, and landed in business IT. Guess it's time for me to move on again. I'd like to get back to my original profession, but that's pretty much out of the question. I've been absent for too long, and besides, it's the most outsourceable thing in the universe.

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I did a lot

by Tony Hopkinson In reply to Business track?

of work in industry automation. Mainly data collection and display from intelligent devices, PLCs etc. Still the occasional job on that front, and way more interesting and challenging than yet another client server database application.
Left for something different after another two years of it last May.

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by jkameleon In reply to I did a lot

> Mainly data collection and display from intelligent devices, PLCs etc.

I did that too mostly, plus a bit od DSP programming. Microcontroller, cross compiler, and no stupid operating systems.

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Never did the latter

by Tony Hopkinson In reply to

the 'tricians did that. Heavy as in heavy industry and I did not have the competence to go around controlling kit that could easily kill someone or simply ramping up a motor incorrectly and reducing it's lifetime at the cost of thousands of pounds.

I could read PLC ladder diagrams of course and trace back though why something wasn't getting transferred between system to the PLC I/O not firing, after that I had to let the guys who know how to play with electricity take over. Learnt more about fault finding, writing robust and above all simple maintainable code there than any anywhere else in my career. The diffence in mindset between production and traditional IT (as in Ivory Tower) was very satisfying as well. You got points for getting things done, not documenting what you hadn't.

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by jkameleon In reply to Never did the latter

> go go around controlling kit that could easily kill someone or simply ramping up a motor incorrectly and reducing it's lifetime at the cost of thousands of pounds.

That's why I've never used operating systems for such projects. It's far cheaper, faster & more secure to write kernel & device drivers yourselves here.

Ladder diagrams are OK for simple stuff, but for more complex projects, they quickly become unclear.

BTW, I have this idea about object oriented ladder diagrams for quite a while, but I've never had enough time & energy to finish it. Non OO variant has even been used in a couple of projects around 1990.


> The diffence in mindset between production and traditional IT (as in Ivory Tower) was very satisfying as well.

"Industrial" mindset served me quite well in IT.

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Industrial mindset

by Tony Hopkinson In reply to

One of the fastest ways to really f'ing annoy me is to make something simple complicated, as though it made you look clever or something. Flaky code doesn't make me that happy either. One thing I've always felt is we need lot more code police in our business and they should be able to do more than frown at you and suggest things. When I'm mentoring, it's one of the first things I always pass on, certainly isn't taught in our educational establishments as far as I can see.

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