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Rambus: Hidden Gem

By arno ·
Rambus is one of the most creative IP companies of the universe. Their inventions are foundational to modern computers, networks, cell phones, cars, televisions and virtually everything that needs fast data transfer between computing chips.

Rambus was founded by two world-renowned Stanford researchers at a time when their invention was more than 50x faster than anything out there. That was around 1990.

In fact, their inventions were protected by patents which made them so powerful, that virtually all international memory manufacturers (Micron, Hynix, Infineon, Samsung, Elpida) conspired against them. Trying to kill Rambus, they have undergone years of criminal antitrust activity, and successfully pushed Rambus' main product (RDRAM - the fastest memory back then) out of the market. Even Intel was forced to give in and switched back to a much slower memory for their Intel P4. Even now, Intel is still suffering from that shock.

Years of corruption at the level of organizations, lawfirms, and even judges have led to turbulent stock action, down from above $100 to below $4.

Now, after their first patent trial in 6 years, Rambus is stronger than ever, with patents upheld in court, with absolutely no wrongdoing of their part. This has been confirmed by the Appeals court and the Supreme court.

Other than more corruption - which will not stand the test against time and the courts - there is no reason that Rambus should not be entitled to earn billions of dollars for their inventions and for compensation for having to endure collusive antitrust crimes for more than a decade.

As soon as settlements are signed, this stock might jump to well above $100, many believe it will hit $500 within the next few years.

You can find much more information on
http://rambus.org/story/

Thanks for your time.

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Is this another one of those Urban Myths?

by Mickster269 In reply to Rambus: Hidden Gem

I don't want to get fooled again...

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their memory stands on its own

by Dr Dij In reply to Is this another one of th ...

nothing to do with the patent, RDRAM is expensive and performs poorly. the high clock speeds seem great till you realize it has much lower bit width than ddram.

tomshardware.com debunked that it was faster, in fact it performed poorly. intel tried to make all their boards use it as they have large stake in company. other pc makers revolted. (those revolting rebels:)

despite the fact that their patent now is valid, the intel trying to force their expensive, poorly performing memory on us gave me a bad taste about the company.

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Reason why RDRAM was expensive

by arno In reply to their memory stands on it ...
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Their memory DOES stand on its own.

by atridi In reply to their memory stands on it ...

RDRAM was as fast or faster than DDR more than 5 YEARS BEFORE DDR existed!! The fact that they operated on a narrow bus was a factor that would have made it LESS expensive to produce, had the memory makers not conspired to restrict production and inflate pricing in order to drive it from the market!

Wake up! You want to see where the bad taste really comes from, check the memory makers. They duped you into buying an inferior product at an inflated price FOR YEARS, all the while thinking the other guy was the evil one!

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still don't get it

by Dr Dij In reply to Their memory DOES stand o ...

they had intel plugging it, producing boards that only used rdram

and in a free country, they can produce as much as they want. I still don't get how any other company could have conspired to stop them.

other than intel, consumers didn't want to buy a memory that was way more expensive and didnt give a real performance boost. tomshardware showed that 800mhz rdram was equiv to 200 or less dram.

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No, this was a real product but it priced itself out of the market.

by sleepin'dawg In reply to Is this another one of th ...

Technology didn't stand still. RDRAM was fast but not fast enought o justify the price in many peoples eyes. Sure their patents are clear but technologicaly,Elvis has left the building There are other comparable products at cheaper prices. It had its day in the sun but time moved on. Remember Vesa Local Bus or for that matter the EISA standard???

Dawg ]:)

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Yep, I remember .

by Mickster269 In reply to No, this was a real produ ...

Back when RDRAM was the "next big thing" , I was actually building the computers for our customers at the time.

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problem is

by Dr Dij In reply to No, this was a real produ ...

they claim they own the patent to dram, ddram
which will cause prices to go up for everyone

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Rambus will only get a few %

by arno In reply to problem is

Micron and others colluded to rise the prices of DRAM by 200% as soon as RDRAM was pushed out of the market.

No way DRAM is going to be more expensive by a royalty rate of a few percents. Besides, the memory manufacturers still have hefty net margins.

By the way, QCOM got a few percents of your cell phone buy price. Dolby also got several dollars from you. Why not pay Rambus a few cents so that they can continue to invent cool stuff like XDR or FlexIO, which make 90% of the interfaces of the CELL processor?

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nice story

by Dr Dij In reply to Rambus will only get a fe ...

but I doubt the collusion part as prices have been rising and falling since. excess fab capacity negates efforts to fix prices.

I don't really know the story terribly well. BUt I'm not going to read it on rambus.org, this is obviously only their side. and why pay royalties for anything if they did not in fact invent or have part in this?

in this case since its been ruled in there favor must have some merits.

qcom negotiated to sell or license its tech to others. rambus appears to have not told companies it was patented then sued them after they started making dram.

even if rambus patent valid they appear to have done some snaky / slimy things to standards committees by with holding info, etc.

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