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The Constitution

By Oz_Media ·
I have NO idea whatsoever what the laws and fine print in the US Constitution are, or any other country for that matter, they are irrelevant to me unless I am found guilty of an offense while in the US, in which case, it is my lawyers knoweldge thatI rely on.

you would probably find this quite common among Canadians, other than the basics or from people who it is their job to know these things.
I have NEVER seen a Canadian or Englishman, spout how his Constitutional rights have been breached, other than the tree huggers and protesters who make it a living.

When I discuss almost any topic with a US Citizen, they can spout the constitution by rote. Is it a big part of school there? Is it relevant to most law abiding citizens?

Many people in other countries think Canada is the land of ice and snow, which anyone who has been here knows is not so. I had a guy in Tulsa ask how I can bear living in the desert after finding out I was living in BC! B.C. is the land of pines, lakes and mountains, EXTREMELY green with one of the largest protected parks in the world.

My question, why does everyone feel that so much effort should be placed in learning their constitutional rights and little or no effort is placed in understanding the rest of the world?
Does this not feed the fire of global ignorance that leads to war?

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US Schooling

by TheChas In reply to The Constitution

I could go on for days about problems with the US educational system.

As to the teaching of the Constitution:

The Constitution is the backbone of ALL US law! So it is important for US citizens to have a basic grasp of the constitution.

Interestingly, when we speak of our "Constitutional Rights", we are actually referring to the first 14 amendments, also known as "The Bill of Rights".

As I recall, (it was a few years ago) my education went over parts of the constitution 4 times.
Grade school US history
High School US history
High School Government
College Government

I believe the primary reason that many US citizens can spout sections of the Constitution (Bill of Rights) is the amount of media coverage that some special interest groups get.

Further, parts of those rights are quoted almost daily in television law enforcement dramas.

Like many topics, the "average" US citizen doesn't know as much about the Constitution as they think they do.
If you were to give a Tech Republic style quiz on the Constitution, you would find very poor score for far too many US citizens.

Interestingly, the people that would score the highest on the quiz would be those citizens who were not born in the US, but applied for and received their citizenship as adults.

By the way, interesting choice of a topic to post on our Independence Day.

Chas

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Thanks for the info Chas

by Oz_Media In reply to US Schooling

"By the way, interesting choice of a topic to post on our Independence Day"

I hope you understand that I posted this topic in all sincerity to further understand the Constitution (Bill of Rights). I really hope it doesn't get misconstrued as another attack.
I hadn't even considered the 4th as I posted it but I guess today's as good as any.
Thank you for your response Chas, it was very helpful, perhapse I was getting the Pledge of Allegiance confused with the Constitution, I believe that is part of daily schoool life there.
I even know the first part "I pledge Allegiance to the flag of the United States of America" Not bad, eh?

I really hope everyone has a great day and can spend some time with loved ones.
Happy 4th everyone!

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Unconstitutional

by GuruOfDos In reply to The Constitution

Us 'Limeys' don't have a Constitution...here in the UK we were never 'constituted'!

Generally, but not invariably, countries that have been around seemingly forever, like the UK for example, don't have 'written' constitutions as our laws and traditions go back for many hundreds of years and have gradually evolved over our long an chequered history. A country that is fairly 'new' in the scheme of things and especially one that has gained independence from a former ruler is more likely to havesuch a thing, as it forms an integral part of it's identity.

The US Constitution arose as part of the independence from Britain back in the 18th century, a mere 230 or so years ago. It states that 'this is who we are, this is what we do and thisis what we believe' and by setting it out in writing, the US are making the statement that 'we are no longer an outpost of the British Empire' but an independent nation and this is how we define ourselves.

By the way...my wife didn't celebrate, even though she's an American living over here in the UK...she was too busy dealing with her daughter's birthday. Like it says in the song, she was 'born on the 4th of July'! However, six of our engineers working for the US Army in Europe were given the day off! Sucks to be back 'home'in the office, huh?!!

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Congratulations

by TheChas In reply to Unconstitutional

Congratulations Guru.

Best of luck with your new family member.

I'm surprised that you had any time at all to post today.

My best wishes to you and your family.

Chas

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Ooops.....erratum

by GuruOfDos In reply to Congratulations

Sorry Chas, I should have clarified!

Our 'new' arrival isn't actually due until 23 August. I was referring to her 13 year old daugter from her previous marriage!

However, I shall accept congratulations for the new one 'in advance' and keep youposted as to developments!

Mike :-)

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To answer:

by admin In reply to The Constitution

"why does everyone feel that so much effort should be placed in learning their constitutional rights and little or no effort is placed in understanding the rest of the world?
Does this not feed the fire of global ignorance that leads to war?"

Why Oz, it's quite simple really. If you watch the news here much at all you will soon realize that we are evangelistic about our constitution and must keep it forward in our minds so that we can help free all of the world. It's really not for our benefit as much as it is to help others become free. Everyones freedom worldwide relies on our constitution, and as we spread this message it is more important that we look at the ways in which others can come to this understanding worldwide as opposed to the confusion caused by having our young people learn ways which may seem good on the surface, but are actually harmful to them. Additionally, it is better to start a war so that the people who want to be free can and the rest will fall in line assoon as the realize the superiority of our system anyway.

I know that my going to a foriegn country right after high school and then getting a liberal arts education rich in world history and global study confused me to the point that I could see a good Monarch, Communism, Anarchy, even a benevolent dictatorship or philosopher king could actually be a positive thing as well as a Republic or Democracy in some cases. I could even see why Democracy could bring about very terrible results. Of course, I also learned the word "ethnocentricity" and upset a lot of folk.

Anyway, I wouldn't recommend learning any other system of government except to criticize it by spouting the conventional wisdom that touts it's weaknesses to a young personhere. Of course, those to those that would do it anyway, I do give a hearty "Bravo"!

:)

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Religion?

by Oz_Media In reply to To answer:

In a nutshell, I think what you're saying is that America has devised a better way of living and that all other countries should follow suit.

If they have some citizens that agree with the "American Way" those citizens should be able to live to acoording to US laws and ideal. If their government restricts or bans this "way of life", the US Army is at Liberty to detroy their government by an act of war?

I grew up with a father who was an RAF pilot. As a child I was moved from England, France, Canada and back to England. Even though I was quite youngm I don't remember kids in school talking about how they wish they could live by America's Constitution. Come to think of it, I don't think anyone even new that America had a Constitution.

Now I must confess that I may have misunderstood your true meaning of your post and apologize if I got the wrong idea but, is that not the most insanely arrogant frame of mind?

That's almost as bad as going to India and toppling the Hindi religious leaders because you believe all citizens MUST believe in Christ because you are of Christian faith and some of their citizens are also.

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!!!

by GuruOfDos In reply to To answer:

>>Everyones freedom worldwide relies on our constitution, and as we spread this message it is more important that we look at the ways in which others can come to this understanding worldwide as opposed to the confusion caused by having our young people learn ways which may seem good on the surface, but are actually harmful to them. Additionally, it is better to start a war so that the people who want to be free can and the rest will fall in line as soon as the realize the superiority of our system anyway.

Ouch! So Britain should accept the US Constitution? As one of the 'other free countries' in this world who participated in Coalition Action in Afghanistan and Iraq?

Your 'system' of Government is based on the British system, which is the basis for most 'democratic' systems worldwide. That could also be known why the British 'Parliament' is referred to as the 'Mother of All Parliaments'

I hope what you are implying refers to accepted 'Western' democracy, rather than the ideathat unless you do things 'The American Way', we reserve the right to bomb the **** out of you and impose our rule on your nation.

That, my friend, isn't democracy....that's dictatorship!

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basis of U.S. Constitution

by john_wills In reply to !!!

Those 13 colonies became independent not of Britain, which was not united for another 24 years, but of Great Britain, which had been united for 69 years. The U.S. Constituion is based not on the Constituion of Great Britain in 1776 but on how Montesquieu in Esprit des Lois had some decades earlier imagined the Constitution of Great Britain to be. When Great Britain united it started with a balance of powers like that of England and Wales; as time went on it took on Scottish characteristics, notably the fusion of legislature and executive. Some of the revolutionary pmaphlets leading up to 1776 actually refer to this change.

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Mother of Parliaments

by john_wills In reply to !!!

The 19th-Century politician who coined this phrase said that England, by which he meant Britain, was the mother of parliaments. He did not mean that parliaments abroad were based on the British parliament but that each parliament was born by election of the people of the country. Germany is the mother of successive Federal Assemblies; the Irish Free State is the mother of Oichtearases, if that's the right way to write it; Norway is the mother of Big Things, etc.

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