How to connect to an SMB server from GNOME 3.34

Connecting to an SMB share on your LAN is easy with GNOME 3.34.

How to connect to an SMB server from GNOME 3.34 Connecting to an SMB share on your LAN is easy with GNOME 3.34.

GNOME 3.34 has been out for a while now, and it's a step or two ahead of where it previously was. Both performance and reliability have improved, such that every user should be upgrading to the latest release.

Over time, a few features have evolved. One such feature is how you connect to an SMB server. With this feature you can easily connect the GNOME file manager (formerly named Nautilus, but now goes by the title "Files") to an SMB server on your LAN. 

I want to walk you through this process. It's quick, easy, and allows you to do even more work with your Windows cohorts.

SEE: Choosing your Windows 7 exit strategy: Four options (TechRepublic Premium)

What you'll need

The only things you'll need for this to work are:

An SMB share on your LAN and a Linux distribution that runs the latest version of GNOME. If you're unsure of which version of the DE you're running, open the Files app, click the Files drop-down (in the GNOME top bar) and select Show Details (Figure A). GNOME Software will open. Scroll down to the details section and you should see that Files is running at least version 3.34. If not, update if possible. 

I'll be demonstrating on Ubuntu Desktop 19.10, running GNOME 3.34.1-1.

Figure A

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Locating your version of GNOME.

How to make the connection

In order to make this connection, open Files. From within the application, click Other Locations in the sidebar (Figure B).

Figure B

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The GNOME Files sidebar.

In the resulting window, locate the Connect To Server entry at the bottom (Figure C).

Figure C

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The Connect To Server entry in GNOME Files.

In the Enter server address text area type the SMB address like so:

smb://SHARE_IP/SHARE​

Where SHARE_IP is the IP address of the share and SHARE is the name of the share. So if the share is Documents at 10.34.1.26, the full address would be smb://10.34.1.26/Documents. Type the address and either hit Enter on your keyboard or click Connect.

You will then be prompted for your share credentials (Figure D).

Figure D

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The SMB authentication window.

If the share you are connecting to requires credentials, select Registered User, type your Username, the Domain (if required), and your user Password. 

At the bottom of the authentication window, you'll see three options:

  • Forget Password Immediately

  • Remember Password Until You Logout

  • Remember Forever

If security is an issue, select Forget Password Immediately, which will ensure that as soon as you disconnect the share, the password will be forgotten. With this option, the next time you attempt to connect to the share, you'll have to re-enter your credentials. If you select Remember Password Until You Logout, the GNOME keyring will store the password, so you don't have to enter it for the share, until you log out of GNOME. If you select Remember Forever, the GNOME keyring will save the password indefinitely.

Click Connect and the connection will be made. You should see the share show up in the GNOME Files sidebar (Figure E).

Figure E

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The Documents share is now accessible from the GNOME Files sidebar.

And that's it. When you're finished using the share you can click the upward pointing arrow associated with its sidebar entry to disconnect (unmount). Viola! You're done. Happy sharing.

Also see

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Image: Jack Wallen