Software

Windows 10's troubled 1809 update is headed your way after months of fixing showstopping bugs

Windows 10 computers started receiving the new version of the OS via Windows Update yesterday, marking the beginning of a phased rollout to the bulk of PCs used in homes and by small businesses.

Microsoft's troubled Windows 10 October 2018 Update has finally started rolling out to the majority of users.

Windows 10 computers started receiving the new version of the OS via Windows Update yesterday, marking the beginning of a phased rollout to the bulk of PCs used in homes and by small businesses.

The feature update, also known as version 1809, has had a pretty torrid time since it was revealed in October last year, with the rollout halted on October 6th, after a number of PCs were hit by a file-wiping bug. Following the decision to pause the rollout, a number of other issues were discovered with build 1809, including incorrect information about CPU utilization, an issue handling .ZIP folders, and driver clashes.

After these bugs emerged, Microsoft faced calls to slow the pace at which new features are added to Windows 10 and to take time to ensure new releases are stable. In the wake of the problems, Microsoft introduced a way for those testing early builds of the OS under the Windows Insider Program to flag the severity of bugs and committed to "improve our ability to prevent issues".

SEE: Windows 10 power tips: Secret shortcuts to your favorite settings (Tech Pro Research)

Due to the staggered nature of the rollout, it may still be some time before Windows 10 users receive the new version via Windows Update, with Microsoft saying it would initially only offer the update to "devices we believe will have the best update experience".

As has been the case since late last year, home users can force the update by clicking 'Check for updates' under the Windows Update page in the Settings app or installing it via the Windows 10 Download page.

Microsoft has previously said Windows Update will use a machine-learning system to consider aspects such as driver and anti-virus compatibility before pushing feature updates to PCs, and that updates in general should be smaller and less painful.

Larger businesses, which tend to use alternative methods for managing updates, will have at least several additional months grace before receiving the 1809 feature update.

The October 2018 update offers various new features and tweaks aimed at home users and businesses.

Key additions include a cloud clipboard, which provides a history of copied and clipped content across different devices, and new Storage Sense options for automatically clearing hard drive space. Meanwhile, IT pros get a simpler interface for controlling system security and various command line and Windows Subsystem for Linux improvements.

To see a full round-up, check out our guide to the top new features and our walkthrough of the notable changes aimed at businesses and IT admins.

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About Nick Heath

Nick Heath is chief reporter for TechRepublic. He writes about the technology that IT decision makers need to know about, and the latest happenings in the European tech scene.

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