General discussion

Locked

2003 Server would not see the rest of the network

By taylor03 ·
I connnected 2 windows 2003 servers to a basic workgroup and both of those servers would not see the rest of the network. I did all the basic tests but nothing worked. Those 2 servers work on another workgroup with no problem. This network has a Birch router (T1 service), 24 port Linksys switch, and a netgear switch.

Any suggestions?

thanks
chris

This conversation is currently closed to new comments.

3 total posts (Page 1 of 1)  
| Thread display: Collapse - | Expand +

All Comments

Collapse -

by nla467 In reply to 2003 Server would not see ...

Hi,

You mention you did some basic tests. Did you try pinging the servers by its own loopback address to test if your IP stack isn't corrupted? Are these the only ones having trouble seeing the network? If it is then most likely, the ip stack is not configured properly on these servers.

Go to Start | Run | Command
cd to C:
ping 127.0.0.1
if ping is successful, your ip stack is good, if not you need to install this from the Windows installation CD.

Let me know if you get any progress.

Collapse -

by rr-travis In reply to 2003 Server would not see ...

In a big network with multiple domains and workgroups spread across several subnets separated by routers, browsing can become complex and hence it becomes necessary to understand the techniques of browsing to troubleshoot browser-related problems. When all workstations and servers are WINS enabled, if there are no workgroups in the entire network, all clients will be able to browse every other domain and members of those domains in the network.

When there are workgroups in the network, workgroup clients will not be able to see remote workgroups and members in those workgroups. This is because workgroups are not WAN aware and workgroups separated by routers are considered to be discrete workgroups even if they have the same name. This is by design and is an expected behavior. Workgroup clients can however browse remote domains provided there is at least one member of the remote domain on the local subnet. This domain member announces the presence of that domain on its subnet and thus workgroup clients know about the existence of that domain and will get the browse list from that domain member that is also a master browser for that domain on that subnet.

Domain members, however, can browse a remote workgroup, provided there is at least one domain member on the remote subnet where the workgroup is located. This domain member includes in its browse list the workgroup name it sees on its network and sends that list to the domain master browser, which is the primary domain controller (PDC) of that domain. The domain master browser in turn sends that list to every other master browser in remote subnets. Thus, all other subnets having members of that domain will know this workgroup exists. Because workgroups do not have a concept of domain master browser, this technique will not work for workgroup members and so they cannot browse remote workgroups.

Collapse -

by rr-travis In reply to 2003 Server would not see ...

In a big network with multiple domains and workgroups spread across several subnets separated by routers, browsing can become complex and hence it becomes necessary to understand the techniques of browsing to troubleshoot browser-related problems. When all workstations and servers are WINS enabled, if there are no workgroups in the entire network, all clients will be able to browse every other domain and members of those domains in the network.

When there are workgroups in the network, workgroup clients will not be able to see remote workgroups and members in those workgroups. This is because workgroups are not WAN aware and workgroups separated by routers are considered to be discrete workgroups even if they have the same name. This is by design and is an expected behavior. Workgroup clients can however browse remote domains provided there is at least one member of the remote domain on the local subnet. This domain member announces the presence of that domain on its subnet and thus workgroup clients know about the existence of that domain and will get the browse list from that domain member that is also a master browser for that domain on that subnet.

Domain members, however, can browse a remote workgroup, provided there is at least one domain member on the remote subnet where the workgroup is located. This domain member includes in its browse list the workgroup name it sees on its network and sends that list to the domain master browser, which is the primary domain controller (PDC) of that domain. The domain master browser in turn sends that list to every other master browser in remote subnets. Thus, all other subnets having members of that domain will know this workgroup exists. Because workgroups do not have a concept of domain master browser, this technique will not work for workgroup members and so they cannot browse remote workgroups.

Back to Networks Forum
3 total posts (Page 1 of 1)  

Related Discussions

Related Forums