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Adventures of the ITIL Imp

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What does it mean to be a Service Delivery Manager?

by Itilimp In reply to Adventures of the ITIL Im ...

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">Over the past 2 years I've been thinking that we could really use a Service Delivery Manager where I work. Curiously enough, it turns out that the new Technical Operations Manager thinks so as well and sees the role as fundamental to contributing to the overall strategy for service provision. So he asked me to write a paper outlining my strategy for service provision over the coming years. Great, except that as the reporting lines have not yet been resolved my line managers are reluctant to let me spend any time researching and writing the report as it will take away from the day job. A fair point, but should I really be doing this in my own time and not being paid for it? Part of me says 'no' - it is for work to benefit therefore I should continue to maintain my work/life balance. Another part says that it is a missed opportunity for me personally if I do not.<br />
<br />Anyhow... all of this has me wondering 'What does it mean to be a Service Delivery Manager?' I believe it is more than service level management as defined by ITIL, and it should include service introduction management. I'd like to write a job description and person specification, so, as a starting point, started trawling job adverts only to find there is a wide range of views. Over the next week or so I'm throwing the question open to the rest of you. I'll write up my answer in a couple of weeks incorporating your views, and although it may not be definitive - hopefully it will be a reasonable answer to an important question.</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://itilimp.blogspot.com/2006/04/what-does-it-mean-to-be-service.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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ITIL Foundation Certificate - Tips to pass the exam

by Itilimp In reply to Adventures of the ITIL Im ...

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">One of the frequent questions I come across is 'how do I pass the Foundation exam?' The ITIL Foundation Certificate is the only ITIL examination that can be taken through self-study and public examination. I personally recommend a course with an accredited training provider as you get the benefit of networking with others and can glean some useful insights into how ITIL works in the real world - which you can't get from the books. Also, decent trainers have prior experience with the examinations and can test you in mock examination conditions using official sample papers. Furthermore, they can advise you of the key things that really must be memorised, and the things that you need to understand (though not necessarily know by rote). I took my ISEB Foundation Certificate through <a href="http://www.foxit.net">Fox IT</a> in the UK and was trained by Gerry McLaughlin and would highly recommend them.<br />
<br />There are two examining boards for ITIL certifications, the <a href="http://www.bcs.org/server.php?show=nav.5732">ISEB</a> and <a href="http://www.exin-exams.com/">EXIN</a>. Whichever board you choose, ensure you learn the content of their syllabus.<span class="postbody">
<br />
<a class="postlink" href="http://www.exin.nl/pdfout/200604052123371597529.pdf" target="_blank">Download EXIN Syllabus (PDF)</a>
<br />
<a class="postlink" href="http://www.bcs.org/upload/pdf/foundationsyllabus.pdf" target="_blank">Download the ISEB Syllabus (PDF)</a>
</span>
<br />
<br />My advice would be to ensure you know:<br />- which processes belong to service delivery and which to service support<br />- the key activities that make up each process<br />- who is responsible for various activities (in terms of process ownership)<br />- the acronyms and terminology used in each process as well as key phrases that may indicate which process the question is about (<a href="http://www.get-best-practice.co.uk/glossaries.aspx" target="_blank">Glossary of terms link</a&gt<br />- the inter-relations between processes<br />- the benefits that can be realised from each process<br />
<br />Ensure you remember that they are testing you on ITIL as it is in the books, NOT on what you do (or don't do!) in your current organisation.<br />
<br />In terms of the examination itself which is 40 multiple choice questions (ISEB), read the question - ensure you understand it then look at all the answers. If you don't know the answer straight away, work with a process of elimination. Quite often with these there is one really wrong answer, and with the other three there is one that is 'more correct' than the others. So be careful not to be caught out. Read EVERY word of an answer. Overlooking the word 'NOT' can be the difference between a correct or wrong answer!<br />
<br />If you know the material, you'll find the exam is less exerting than a walk in the park. If you don't, you may struggle - so make sure you do <br />
<br />A couple of sample questions from ISEB sample paper 3 2003<br />
<br />10. Which of the following is NOT a technique usually associated with Availabilty Management?<br />A. Auto error detection<br />B. Duplexing<br />C. Analysing Data<br /&gt. Queuing theory<br />
<br />16. Which of the following best describes why an SLA should contain definitions of terms?<br />A. To ensure that anywhere there is a measurement required within the SLA then it is realistically measurable<br />B. To ensure that both the customer and IT can unambiguously understand the terms in the SLA<br />C. To make sure that all clauses in the SLA make sense<br /&gt. To ensure that the customer's understanding of a particular term is the one meant in the SLA.<br />
<br />Finally, some links that may be of use:<br />
<br />Dr Itil used to have a foundation success blog with tips up but it seems to have died. There is a <a href="http://dritil.blogspot.com/2005/11/how-to-pass-itil-foundation-multiple.html" target="_blank">little entry on his old blog</a>.<br />
<br />You can try some <a href="http://www.itsmexams.com/index.html" target="_blank">ITIL exam practice</a>.<br />
<br />
<a href="http://www.unc.edu/remedy/presentations/itil_study_guide.pdf" target="_blank">ITIL essentials study guide</a> (not used myself so unable to confirm accuracy but Dr ITIL linked it awhile back so I'd expect it to be okay).<br />
<br />
<a href="http://www.robertperrine.biz/itil/Perrine_ITIL_Notes.pdf" target="_blank">ITIL reference guide</a> on <a href="http://www.robertperrine.biz/" target="_blank">Robert Perrine's site</a>. Well worth browsing the rest of his site under the ITIL section as he includes slides from his study lessons.<br />
<br />Good luck, see you on the other side!<br />
<span style="font-style: italic;font-size:85%;">
<br />P.S. Answer to No. 10 = D and No. 16 = B</span>
</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://itilimp.blogspot.com/2006/04/itil-foundation-certificate-tips-to.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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Into the frying pan - My first 'major' project - part 2

by Itilimp In reply to Adventures of the ITIL Im ...

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">In part 1 I talked about how I got involved in the rather interesting world of Project Management. In part 2 (and those that follow) I'm going to talk about some of the highs and lows along the way, my learning points, etc. So, onward!<br />
<br />The first thing we did was assemble a project team. This was quite a strange affair as, looking back, I think I had very little to do with the make up of it; rather, it landed in my lap. The first thing that happened was the board appointed one of their group to be the project executive (sponsor). As it happened he was from one of the other council's in the partnership. We met one afternoon and had a really good chat about ourselves and backgrounds, what we were expected to do, the kind of deliverables we wanted from it, etc. We seemed to see eye-to-eye on things and were keen that it needed to be a managed as short sharp project.<br />
<br />Then came the rest of the team. As one would expect we involved a Help Desk operator from each council - except the one I was from. Having started at this council in the role and continuing to oversee it, it was considered I had the required knowledge. We did include a member of technical support from one of the other councils to represent that viewpoint but that is where the team stopped growing. Although we had opportunities to invite a representative from a separate partnership technical sub-group; in hindsight it would have been better if they were included as part of the project team itself. So, we've got 2 project team members from each council except the one I work for who had, well - me.<br />
<br />Our first project meeting felt quite exciting and there was a very positive vibe. None of us knew one another and there was a lot of work to do to become a team, but still, we were all curious about how this partnership would work and here we were, starting to actually work together. Once we got the introductions out of the way and some understanding of one another's viewpoints we delved straight into figuring out just what we were expected to deliver.<br />
<br />We figured that a good place to start would be defining our ideal help desk operation and an appraisal of the existing call logging tools in use at each council (Heat, Sunrise, and Touchpaper). This is where I found questionnaires quite helpful to both elicit the information and to compile and compare the results afterwards.<br />
<br />And with that I leave you this cartoon that I believe is rather appropriate to the position we found ourselves in... and something you want to avoid at all costs (Found on <a href="http://www.grin.com/en/fulltext/ine/23156.html">http://www.grin.com/en/fulltext/ine/23156.html</a> ) !<br />
<br />
<a href="http://photos1.blogger.com/blogger/670/2181/1600/project%20specification.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}">
<img alt="" border="0" src="http://photos1.blogger.com/blogger/670/2181/400/project%20specification.jpg" style="margin: 0px auto 10px; display: block; text-align: center; cursor: pointer;" />
</a>
</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://itilimp.blogspot.com/2006/04/into-frying-pan-my-first-major-project_18.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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The ITIL Imp goes into hiding?

by Itilimp In reply to Adventures of the ITIL Im ...

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">Well not really, but it's unlikely that I will be posting for a week or so as I'm in the process of moving house and I'm sure most of you know how time consuming that can be. I suddenly realise not just how many books I own, but worse, how many of those I still haven't made the time to read! So, until next time, this is the ITIL Imp signing off!</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://itilimp.blogspot.com/2006/04/itil-imp-goes-into-hiding.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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Into the frying pan - My first 'major' project - part 3

by Itilimp In reply to Adventures of the ITIL Im ...

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">A couple of weeks into the project I was told by the board that I was to use PrInCE2 Lite methodology to manage the project - and they wanted a PID. PrInCE2? A PID? What's are they when they're at home? I made haste to the office of our resident qualified practitioner who thankfully took pity on my ignorance and walked me towards the light.<br />
<br />A few hours later I emerged with a seriously high-level overview of <a href="http://www.ogc.gov.uk/prince2/">Prince 2</a> (which I now knew was yet another wonderful acronym - PRojects IN Controlled Environments) and some standard templates all prepared to write the PID (i.e. Project Initiation Document a.k.a. PDS - Project Definition Statement).<br />
<br />When I say seriously high level I mean that I came out knowing what SU, IP, DP, CS, MP, SB, CP, and PL stood for and a rough idea of what was needed in each - and I mean rough! For those of you not familiar with Prince 2 it is pretty hefty and not something that can be learnt just like that. I am not qualified and rather keen to attend a course so I can get my head around it all!<br />
<br />Anyhow, once I delved into the template for the Project Initiation Document I cringed. There were yet more terms I didn't know, and sections that needed answers that I didn't yet have. <br />
<br />Thankfully you need not scour the web for such definitions as I have 2 links to recommend that will make quite the difference. The first is the Glossary of Terms (<a href="http://www.prince2.org.uk/Web/Site/PRINCE2Resources/GlossariesOfTerms.asp">9 page PDF for download</a&gt. The second is not exclusively Prince 2 but a truly excellent resource - <a href="http://maxwideman.com/pmglossary/intro.htm">Wideman Comparative Glossary of Project Management Terms v3.1</a>.<br />
<br />In the next part of this saga, I will talk about the stakeholders and how I got their input (and in some cases how I failed to do so!).</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://itilimp.blogspot.com/2006/04/into-frying-pan-my-first-major-project_26.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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Chugg chugg!

by Itilimp In reply to Adventures of the ITIL Im ...

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">Hello again. I'm in the new house but unfortunately I'm waiting on my broadband installation so I've fallen back onto, dare I say it, dial-up. It just shows what an internet addict I ashould reduce myself to such drastic measures !<br />
<br />I've got quite a lot on at the moment and also going on holiday so I'll try and get one decent post in per week until I'm back on broadband.<br />
<br />One thing to highlight quickly for and ITIL people out there is the opportunity to attend a teleseminar with Robin Yearsley and Randy Steinberg on 10th May. If you're interested do <a href="http://itservicetoday.blogs.com/ask_the_service_expert/">sign-up now</a> as places are limited.</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://itilimp.blogspot.com/2006/05/chugg-chugg.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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What is SFIA anyway?

by Itilimp In reply to Adventures of the ITIL Im ...

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">I've mentioned SFIA in a previous entry and thought it would be helpful if I gave a quick overview of what it is, and why we should care about it.<br />
<br />In July 2003, the BCS, the IEE, and IMIS formed the SFIA (Skills for the Information Age) foundation. The primary goal of this was to create a high level skills competency framework for IT professionals, much like those that already existed in other industries, as well as a standard language for talking about IT skills. Indeed, it grew in part from the BCS's ISM (Industry Standard Model) which was subsequently modified in accordance with SFIA and rebranded as SFIA+. It is SFIA+ that forms the basis of the BCS professional development product offerings. But I digress, back to the framework itself.<br />
<br />SFIA version 3 is at first sight a relatively simple two-dimensional matrix. There are 7 responsibility levels across the top (1 being the lowest) and 6 main categories of work down the left as follows:<br />
<br />Strategy and Planning<br />Development<br />Business Change<br />Service Provision<br />Procurement and management support<br />Ancillary Skills<br />
<br />Each main category incorporates sub-categories and skills. It should be noted that the placement of skills within categories can be argued (and has been). When using the matrix to assess your skills as an IT professional it is important to indicate where you have a competency regardless of which category it falls under; the categories are really a convenient matrix navigation aid and not intended to be limiting. For example, if your main role at work is that of network support this falls within the Service Provision category. However, you also have project management experience which falls under Business Change. Therefore you have skills in both areas, and that is okay. In today's environment I'd go so far as to say cultivating skills in the business change arena is to be encouraged!<br />
<br />Okay, so far it seems sensible enough, but how do you know if you are selecting the 'right' skill and how do you decide which level to record against it? That's where the <a href="http://www.sfia.org.uk/pdfs/sfia3-ref.pdf">skills definitions</a> reference document comes in. Let's look at the example of Network support within User support on page 29.<br />
<blockquote>Network support (NTAS)<br />The provision of network maintenance and support services. Support may be provided both to users of the systems and to service delivery functions. Support typically takes the form of investigating and resolving problems and providing information about the systems. It may also include monitoring their performance. Problems may be resolved by providing advice or training to users about the network?s functionality, correct operation or constraints, by devising work-arounds, correcting faults, or making general or site-specific modifications.<br />
<br />Level 2 Assists in investigation and resolution of network problems. Assists with specified maintenance procedures.<br />
<br />Level 3 Identifies and resolves network problems following agreed procedures. Uses network management software and tools to collect agreed performance statistics. Carries out agreed network maintenance tasks.<br />
<br />Level 4 Maintains the network support process and checks that all requests for support are dealt with according to agreed procedures. Uses network management software and tools to investigate problems, collect performance statistics and create reports.<br />
<br />Level 5 Drafts and maintains procedures and documentation for network support. Ensures that all requests for support are dealt with according to set standards and procedures.</blockquote>
<br />From this we can decide whether it is the most appropriate skill and furthermore, the appropriate level with which to assess ourselves against.<br />
<br />For IT professionals, this framework is an excellent tool to help identify your strengths, weaknesses, and areas for improvement, i.e. peform a gap analysis. However, I'd go a step further and say that IT professionals should join the British Computer Society and make use of the Career Developer facility using SFIA+ which has much more depth. More on that in another blog entry.<br />
<br />For employers, once your staff have completed an assessment you then have an accurate skills database which is a plus point for auditors and Investors in People assessments! However, far more use is the fact that should someone leave the organisation, you now have the information at your fingertips to decide which of their skills you wish to hire back in, or make the decision that actually you need someone with another skill set.<br />
<br />Long-term I see the terminology used in SFIA forming the basis of job adverts. As it becomes the recognised standard for the industry by the IT professionals themselves; recruitment can be streamlined as candidates will have a clearer idea of what the job entails before making an application, and employers will have a clearer idea of what they are actually looking for. A definite improvement over the current situation. <blockquote />
</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://itilimp.blogspot.com/2006/05/what-is-sfia-anyway.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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Women and ICT - where are they all?

by Itilimp In reply to Adventures of the ITIL Im ...

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<span style="font-style: italic;">Hi again, sorry for the lack of entries - it has been a par</span>
<span style="font-style: italic;">ticularly busy time for me. I have attended a number of events that I want to talk about on this blog so I'll try and catch up over the coming month!</span>
<br />
<br />First of all I want to tell you about a new personal development challenge that I gave myself this past week. An opportunity arose through the <a href="http://www.bcs.org.uk/bcswomen/">BCS Women Group</a> to present to a group of year 10 girls (aged 14) from local schools at a 'Women into ICT' day at a local college. I've done a fair bit of presenting but this was the first time to a young audience. With 45 minutes to fill, I didn't want to just talk about my role as a support officer as I figured that would put them to sleep. I needed another angle so started digging around a little.<br />
<br />I was surprised to find that in 2001 just 22% of the IT workforce was made up of women which apparently was a 10% reduction over the previous 7 years! The more I read the more I wanted to convince these young women that they are needed in the future UK IT industry. Women were leaving IT in droves...why was that? Could it be the way it is taught in schools? Or is it still all about perception?<br />
<br />My research turned up the belief (which I happen to agree with) that IT in schools needs to be split between the basic IT skills that everyone needs (much in the same way then require English and Maths) and the IT / computing required for a career in IT. There is a <a href="http://www.bcs.org/server.php?show=ConWebDoc.4427">new IT diploma</a> being developed for 2008 so that when kids leave school they actually have skills relevant to the workplace.<br />
<br />There's even a <a href="http://www.cc4g.net/">Computer Club for Girls (CC4G)</a> scheme which schools can be involved with to show girls other aspects of technology and its applications.<br />
<br />So, people are already trying to do something about IT education. That left me wondering what I could do to combat the perception. Another little stat for you from a survey in 2005.<ul>
<li>35% of respondents aged 13-17 associate a career in IT as some form of administrative or secretarial office work.</li>
<li>27% of respondents would consider a career in ICT or Computing. </li>
</ul>For me this was a shocking revelation and it helped me form the theme for my presentation. I knew I wanted to break the presentation up into parts to make it more interactive and after talking my ideas through with a few people came up with what I hoped would be a winning formula.<br />
<ol>
<li>Introduce myself and outline the agenda for them (90 seconds)</li>
<li style="text-align: left;">Split them into groups for a group exercise: "Who am I?" This was designed to get them thinking about difference aspects of an IT support worker through personality, environment, skills, and education (20 minutes). I also hoped it would reinforce the stereotype to go neatly into:<a href="http://photos1.blogger.com/blogger/670/2181/1600/WIT%20Group%20Exercise.0.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}">
<img alt="" border="0" src="http://photos1.blogger.com/blogger/670/2181/320/WIT%20Group%20Exercise.0.jpg" style="margin: 0px auto 10px; display: block; text-align: center; cursor: pointer;" />
</a>
</li>
<li>Showing a TV clips of Nick Burns The Computer Guy with Jennifer Aniston to sum up the stereotype and demonstrate how IT support shouldn't be done (5 minutes).</li>
<li>'A day in the life...' A quick talk about the different aspects of my work as well as those I work with to show that we aren't the stereotype (well, not all of us anyway!).</li>
<li>A quick explanation of how I got from school to where I am now.</li>
<li>An explanation of why I was there on a 'women into ICT' day including some stats to reinforce a few points.<br />
</li>
<li>Finishing with a quick fire quiz with sweets for correct answers.<br />
</li>
</ol>I'm pleased to say that the girls got stuck into the exercise and in some cases surprised me with their appreciation for IT requiring a more varied skillset than I expected them to recognise. In particular they stressed communication. Yet another great example for me of why we need more women in IT service delivery roles - they get it and they haven't been taught (no offence to any men reading this)!<br />
<br />The clip made them laugh, and they managed to stay awake for what I considered the boring part of the presentation, then sprung back into life for the quiz.<br />
<br />I stayed to listen to another presentation, curious as to the approach they took, which was quite different to mine but in some senses perhaps more useful as it gave them a lot to think about in terms of different job roles available in IT where as I focused primarily on support and destroying stereotypes.<br />
<br />I also assisted with the practical HTML workshop which was fun. They seemed to really enjoy seeing the results of their coding and playing around with colours etc.<br />
<br />All in all I found the experience very worth while and would certainly do it again if the opportunity arose. It was a challenge for me to find ways to maintain the interest of a room of 25 young girls as well as deliver it. I can only hope that if they only took one thing away from the presentation its that 'A career in IT is for women too'!</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://itilimp.blogspot.com/2006/06/women-and-ict-where-are-they-all.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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ITIL Refresh v3 - Update

by Itilimp In reply to Adventures of the ITIL Im ...

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">There are a lot of rumours flying around at the moment centred around the OGC's Commercial Activities Recompetition (CAR) project which many fear will have a negative impact on the ITIL Refresh and indeed, the future of ITIL, training and its' qualification scheme currently adminsitered by the ISEB and EXIN. The OGC released an <a href="http://www.itil.co.uk/factsheet_car_and_itil.htm">official statement</a> on 15th June 2006 to try and mitigate these concerns, although I have to say that I am still concerned and will continue to watch this space.<br />
<br />The other major news in ITIL at the moment is the publication of the <a href="http://www.itil.co.uk/scope_web.pdf">ITIL v3 Refresh Scope and Development Plan</a> and the revised <a href="http://www.get-best-practice.biz/glossary/ITIL_Glossary.pdf">Glossary of Terms, Definitions and Acronyms</a>.<br />
<br />I haven't quite read through both documents yet, but I'll post some of my observations once I have. At the moment I'm cringing at the idea of having to purchase an entire library in order to follow a process through the entire lifecycle. Mind you, if they were to publish each process as an entire lifecycle in addition to the lifecycle books themselves then that might help. At this stage I'm really not sure!</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://itilimp.blogspot.com/2006/06/itil-refresh-v3-update.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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Who wants an IT Diploma?

by Itilimp In reply to Adventures of the ITIL Im ...

If you're not quite sure what I am talking about let me fill you in quickly.<br /><br />The UK government has recognised that the current education system is somewhat lacking in a number of industry sectors of which IT is but one (no doubt thanks to certain major employers and organisations such as the <a href="http://www.bcs.org.uk">BCS </a>saying that IT educuation is not fit for purpose and that there are too many university courses for IT churning out students who still need training to become effective in a real world job).<br /><br />The hope is that developing an IT diploma (aimed at 14-19 year olds) with significant input from businesses (how much consultation is being done with current teachers of IT & computing I have no idea!) will lead to more interesting courses, and students are actually ready to take on an apprenticeship or progress to universities.<br /><br />So, back to what I was saying... I've read the development specifications and so far I like what I see. Focusing on the level 3 diploma there are skills that students would be required to achive a basic standard in that many people in today's workplace today either don't have or don't care about. I mean, how many of you learnt how to write a business case for IT investment at school? Or best practice and the basics of project management frameworks?<br /><br />If this qualification leads to more interesting education which attracts more women (not that I'm biased or anything!) and students who know more than standard network topologies then it has to be a step in the right direction.<br /><br />Of course, there are all the issues regarding re-educating IT teachers to teach the syllabus as well as businesses stepping up to offer work placements but I think the future is brighter than it has been.<br /><br />If you're interested in learning more about the IT Diploma take a look at:<br /><br />The "<a href="http://www.e-skills.com/public/File/IT%20Diploma/060430%20Diploma%20Structure%20Content%20and%20Progression%20-VERSION%201%20%2830th%20April%202006%29%20%282%29.pdf">SPECIALISED DIPLOMA: THE IT LINE LEARNING STRUCTURE, BALANCE OF<br />CONTENT AND PROGRESSION</a> " and the "<a href="http://www.e-skills.com/public/File/060222%20Employer%20Needs%20Definition%20-%20input%20from%20UK%20employer%20survey%20%28FINAL%29%281%29.pdf">14-19 Diploma Development (IT), EMPLOYER NEEDS DEFINITION:<br />input from the UK EMPLOYER SURVEY</a> "<br /><br />Further information is available from the <a href="http://www.e-skills.com/Qualifications-&-Training/IT-Diploma/1648">E-Skills UK Website</a>.<a href="br">http://www.e-skills.com/Qualifications-&-Training/IT-Diploma/1648"><br /></a><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://itilimp.blogspot.com/2006/06/who-wants-it-diploma.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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