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Backbone

By mdl3 ·
Hello, my question is about how is the backbone physically connected to the switches?, on a school senario, where there will be 1 MDF and 3 IDF's, there will be 2 routers and a 10/100 switch in the MDF, and 1 10/100 switch in each IDF,
MDF= switch 0
IDF1=switch 1
IDF2=switch 2
IDF3=switch 3
Ill be using FDDI for backbone the switches are going to be 1000 Mts apart from each other.
I understand that the switches are connected to each other through the UPLINK is this correct? or does the backbone comes from the switch in the MDF to the other switches separetly or are the switche connected to each other? , but what if they only have one uplink? how can you connect 3 or more switches with only one uplink per switch?
Please example of bacbone wiring scheme.
PLEASE explain the back bone concept and how is it physicaly connected to the networking devices ( Switches)
Thanks again guys!
MDL3

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Backbone

by Andy Chuho In reply to Backbone

Simply, FDDI assumes a ring topology. Each switch will each a have an FDDI Module (DAS/SAS) which connects to a Light Interface Unit (LIU) via a Zip Chord (fiber patch chord with sc to sc connectors). LIU is termination for FDDI backbone/cable. If it is a collapsed backbone (logical ring- physical star), MDF will have a splice unit in which Fiber cable from IDF's will terminate with jumpers making the ring. The switches operate as peers, no core switch.

In this case, the backbone is aimed atachieving high speed connectivity between buildings and includes the active devices (e.g. switches) and the cable terminated to them. Commercial carriers may have huge (big bandwidth) backbones running for hundreds of miles.

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by mdl3 In reply to Backbone

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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by guru@net In reply to Backbone

Actually Andy is half correct. You may have your MDF or "core" switch as a FDDI concentrator. Suppose all IDF switches B port connect to MDF switch A ports. This is known as a "tree of rings" topology.

Consider two MDF or "core" switches. AllIDF B ports connect to one MDF switch A ports all IDF switch A ports connect to the other MDF switch B ports. Both MDF switches are A->B B->A connected. Nice redundancy!

In either case the MDF switch or switches are your "backbone" switch. It is collapsing the backbone of your network.

-HTH

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by mdl3 In reply to Backbone

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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by mdl3 In reply to Backbone

This question was auto closed due to inactivity

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