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Well, guess it's time I get this thing started.

by josh.hoskins In reply to blog blog blog

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">Well, guess it's time I get this thing started.</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://jch2.blogspot.com/2005/09/well-guess-its-time-i-get-this-thing.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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Woot!! First Post

by josh.hoskins In reply to blog blog blog
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Network Eagle Good Monitoring Great Price

by josh.hoskins In reply to blog blog blog

<a href="http://techrepublic.com.com/5261-1-0.html?query=righttool"><img src="http://i.i.com.com/cnwk.1d/i/z/200602/righttool_blog.gif" style="border-style: none"/></a>

<p>Several years ago, my
company was beginning to rapidly expand our customer base, and the need for
server monitoring became readily apparent. While a simple ping checker had
sufficed till that point, more and more we were seeing need for a multitude of
checks. We needed information on things such as NT Services, applications, and disk
space. While the need was apparent, the
budget was lacking. There are many network monitoring suits out there, but most
of them were greatly cost prohibitive. Reviewing these products was not even an
option as the cost was much more than my budget could bear.</p>

<p><b>The Job</b></p>

<p>I had begun investigating
open source solutions, but the fact that many of them required a *nix install
was prohibitive, as a box dedicated to this was out of the question. Also, our
support staff is almost entirely Windows centric so the support of another O.S.
could become a support nightmare.</p>

<p><b>The Tool</b></p>

<p>Then one day I came across
Network Eagle (<a href="http://network-eagle.com/">http://network-eagle.com/</a&gt.
While I was initially skeptical, this did prove to be the tool I?d been looking
for. </p>

<p>A quick run down of it?s
features include:</p>

<ul><li>Ping Check</li>
<li>FTP Site Check</li>
<li>HTTP Site Check</li>
<li>Database Checks</li>
<li>Application/Process Check</li>
<li>Disk Space Checks</li>
<li>Event Log Checks</li>
<li>NT Service Checks</li>
<li>Custom Scripts and External Commands Checks</li>
</ul>

<p><b>Putting Network Eagle to the test</b></p>

<p>Click here (<a href="2300-1035-6038660.html">http://techrepublic.com.com/2300-1035-6038660.html</a&gt
to see our gallery of Network Eagle screenshots.</p>

<p>Network Eagle comes as a
small (less than 4MB) install executable. You are given a free 30-day trial, so I
downloaded and installed it. The installation was simplicity itself, just click
the executable and follow the prompts. The slowest part is configuring all of
your checks after the application is installed. You must configure each check
manually, though you have the ability to copy checks and then modify them,
which greatly reduces the amount of time to set up. The bar on the left side of
the screen allows you to pick what type of check you want to create. Once in
the check creation screen you have several tabs on the left that guide you
through setting up the check. From within this screen you set the system the
check runs on, needed security credentials to run the check, the type of alerts
you want this alert to send, and the schedule the check runs on. Most of the
tabs are identical between checks, with only the S<i>ettings</i> tab being check dependant.</p>

<p>Two things from this system
really stood out to me. One is that all of the checks from the system run
agentless. That is to say there is no software installed on the target systems.
For environments that love to run there systems as textbook as possible this is
great. The other thing that impressed me was the number of different types of
alerts available. You have the standards of sending an e-mail, logging to
syslog or event viewer, or executing a command, along with restarting a
computer, changing a NT service status, playing a sound alert, or even connecting
to a MS SQL instance and running SQL commands.</p>

<p><b>Right tool for the job?</b></p>

<p>I have had Network Eagle
deployed in production for nearly 3 years now, and it has stood up more than
admirably. On many occasions the database alerts have allowed us to proactively
prevent issues before users were impacted, and the process monitoring has let
our order entry applications run without the need for constant user checking. This
has been a great product for us. We now actually have two instances of it
deployed, one on our internal network and one on our external. This has been a
great application for us, and definitely the right tool for the job.</p>

<strong>Write your own review</strong><br /><br />If you've found the perfect tool for the job, we want to hear about it. <a href="mailto:content1@cnet.com?subject=Right%20Tool">Send us an e-mail</a> describing the product and the job you're using it for. If we feature the product in The Right Tool for the Job? blog, you'll earn a little cash and be featured across the TechRepublic Web site and in our newsletters.

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Network Eagle Good Monitoring Great Price

by LizNY In reply to Network Eagle Good Monito ...

<p>Network Eagle is not the only agentless tool out there. We use adrem NetCrunch to monitor our IP network (approx 450 nodes). Just one license is enough (no additional per node charges), as it is licensed per monitoring workstation. Netcrunch's network maps stand out among others, and it is quite versatile with notification methods in case of problems. I like the fact that you can monitor over 60 network services and I even defined my own ones to be monitored. Sometimes I log in from home via web browser to check some info, which is a big help  - a travel a lot anyway... I got my 30-day trial version at Interop last year, but I think they also have it on their website <a href="http://www.adremsoft.com">www.adremsoft.com</a> </p>

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Network Eagle Good Monitoring Great Price

by LizNY In reply to Network Eagle Good Monito ...

Network Eagle is not the only agentless tool out there. We use Netcrunch to monitor our IP network (approx 450 nodes). Just one license is enough (no additional per node charges), as it is licensed per monitoring workstation. Netcrunch's network maps stand out among others, and it is quite versatile with notification methods in case of problems. I like the fact that you can monitor over 60 network services and I even defined my own ones to be monitored. Sometimes I log in from home via web browser to check some info, which is a big help  - a travel a lot anyway... I got my 30-day trial version at Interop last year, but I think they also have it on their website <a href="http://www.adremsoft.com/"><font color="#0000ff">www.adremsoft.com</font></a> 

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Network Eagle Good Monitoring Great Price

by josh.hoskins In reply to Network Eagle Good Monito ...

Net Crunch looks very nice, but again one of the main reasons I choose Network Eagle was the price.  The Value Edition of Net Crunch is 10X the cost of Network Eagle.

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Network Eagle Good Monitoring Great Price

by Bill Detwiler Editor In reply to Network Eagle Good Monito ...

<p>LizNY,</p>
<p>Netcrunch sounds like an interesting tool. Let me know if you're interested in writing a review of Netcrunch for The Right Tool for the Job? feature. You can send me a private message using my profile link below.</p>

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Network Eagle Good Monitoring Great Price

by mvpatrick In reply to Network Eagle Good Monito ...

<p>I use IPSentry to monitor systems via IP. And it allows checking of services, disk space, etc. And notification features like email, paging, etc. All for $99. And there are many add-ons available too. Really a great product.</p>
<p>- <a href="http://www.ipsentry.net/">http://www.ipsentry.net/</a></p>
<p>I just wanted to mention another great monitoring tool.</p>

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Sending Mail through SQL without SQL Mail

by josh.hoskins In reply to blog blog blog

<style="border-style: none="" a="" href="http://techrepublic.com.com/5261-1-0.html?query=righttool"><img src="http://i.i.com.com/cnwk.1d/i/z/200602/righttool_blog.gif" />

</style="border-style:p><strong>The Job</strong></p>

<p>When the decision was made at my company to move our primary
MS SQL environment to a fault tolerant cluster, we came across one thing that
was missing; SQL Mail was not supported on SQL clusters. With this began the search for a
replacement. We began looking at many
different products to fill this need. We
had determined that we needed a product that could be called and used easily
from code, that could have dynamically written syntax, was affordable, and we
could have support on. </p>


<p><strong>The Tool</strong></p>

<p>After much testing and dismissing we came across
XP_SMTPSendMail80 from <a href="http://www.thorpesoftware.com/">Thorpe Software</a>. We downloaded the free trial version, and
began testing in our development environment.
</p>


<p>The installation of this software was very easy. You download a dll, and then place the dll
anywhere on your SQL Server. At this
point you create an extended stored procedure from their DLL. Once this is completed you are ready to begin
using the procedure. </p>


<p><strong>Putting XP_SMTPSendMail80 to the test</strong></p>

<p>Being a stored procedure you have a great deal of freedom in
not just calling it, but in embedding it within pre-existing code and
jobs. Our developers and I were
instantly wowed with not just the features available, but their ease of use. <a href="http://techrepublic.com.com/2300-10879_11-6043592.html">Here is a link</a> to screenshots of some syntax examples. Some of the features are:</p>

<ul><li>Send multiple attachments using wildcards.
</li><li>Use any SMTP server </li><li>Able to provide
authentication to SMTP Server</li><li>Sends mail to non-standard SMTP ports.
</li><li>Small (73k) and fast dll. </li><li>Uses Windows sockets, so requires no
additional components on the server and can be used from any version of
Windows. </li><li>Execute queries and send results as
attachments, or in the body of the message. </li><li>Format result sets as HTML tables in the
body of the mail. </li><li>Send the results from multiple queries
from a local or a remote server. </li><li>Send mail to multiple recipients in one
call with cc or bcc.</li></ul>

<p>The learning curve for this product was very mild, as
everything from sending attachments to formatting html emails only took minor
adjustments from the standard calling of the Extended Stored Procedure. Adding it to scheduled job was as easy as
adding a step, and using the programs very simple syntax to send an email for
job success or failure. </p>


<p><strong>Right tool for the job?</strong></p>

<p>XP_SmtpSendmail80 has been our enterprise wide standard for
SQL e-mails for over 4 years now, and everyone from the developers to myself
are still in love with this little tool that could. We are constantly finding new ways to use
that we hadn?t thought of before. Every
time a new idea has been thrown around, XP_SmtpSendmail80 has always been up to
the challenge. On the few occasions we
have needed it, the support from <a href="http://www.thorpesoftware.com/">Thorpe
Software</a> has been top notch. With
new versions and bug fixes being released on a regular basis this appears to be
one tool that is able to stand the test of time.</p>


<p> <strong>Write your own review</strong></p>If you've found the perfect tool for the job, we want to hear about it. <a href="mailto:content1@cnet.com?subject=Right%20Tool">Send us an e-mail</a> describing the product and the job you're using it for. If we feature the product in The Right Tool for the Job? blog, you'll earn a little cash and be featured across the TechRepublic Web site and in our newsletters.

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Sending Mail through SQL without SQL Mail

by jpartley In reply to Sending Mail through SQL ...

<p>I do not use this dll, sometimes it works not as good as my expection. Instead I am using a .exe called smtp_mail.exe, try this <a href="http://www.codeproject.com/vb/net/epsendmail.asp">http://www.codeproject.com/vb/net/epsendmail.asp</a>; Pretty good, and you can get the source code, although it is written in C#; </p>

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