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  • #2182861

    Bob’s Blog

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    by bob21 ·

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    • #3239174

      My desktop computer sucks. Is it XP or Cogeco cable or both?

      by bob21 ·

      In reply to Bob’s Blog

      I recently upgraded from Windows Me to XP and installed service pack 2 because it seemed to be getting slower and slower. I thought maybe it had been hijacked although I used AVG7, Ad-aware SE, Spybot Search & Destroy, and EMS FreeSurfer 2.

      We did have a lot of virus and trojan activity earlier while we were using Sympati

    • #3239161

      My system 2002-10-01

      by bob21 ·

      In reply to Bob’s Blog

      Hardware Information for ASUS P5A-B with AMD-K6-2-500 ALi

      OS and User Information
      Operating System: MS Windows Me
      Build: 3000
      Computer Name: P5A
      User Name: Bob

      Memory Sub-System
      Memory Size: 640 MB
      Performance (Memory Size depending): Hi-end

      CPU Detection
      Processor Name: AMD K6-2
      Technology: MMX, 3DNow!
      Frequency: 500.11 MHz
      Performance (CPU Frequency depending): Standard

      IP Network Information
      Domain: net
      Domain Picture:
      IP Address: 24.150.1.63
      IP Name: d150-1-63.home.cgocable.net

      More Information about Detected Processor Family
      Vendor AMD
      Name K6-2
      Codename Chomper, Chomper XT (CXT)
      Family 5
      First Introduction May 28, 1998
      Package Type 321 Pin PGA
      Socket Socket 7+
      Transistors 9.3 (K6-2) Millions
      Process Technology 0.25 ?m
      Core Voltage 2.4 – 2.1 V
      CPU Core Speed 233-550MHz (K6-2)
      External Bus Speed 66, 95, 97, 100MHz
      L1 cache 64KB
      L2 cache External, depends on Motherboard
      Features MMX, 3DNow!

    • #3239159

      my system 2005-05-23 (only software changed)

      by bob21 ·

      In reply to Bob’s Blog

      DxDiagnostic Report (dxdiag)
      ——————
      System Information
      ——————
      Time of this report: 5/23/2005, 22:17:19
      Machine name: HINTON-P5A
      Operating System: Windows XP Professional (5.1, Build 2600) Service Pack 2 (2600.xpsp_sp2_gdr.050301-1519)
      Language: English (Regional Setting: English)
      System Manufacturer: n/a
      System Model: n/a
      BIOS: Award Modular BIOS v4.51PG
      Processor: AMD-K6(tm) 3D processor, MMX, 3DNow, ~500MHz
      Memory: 640MB RAM
      Page File: 226MB used, 1333MB available
      Windows Dir: C:\WINDOWS
      DirectX Version: DirectX 9.0c (4.09.0000.0904)
      DX Setup Parameters: Not found
      DxDiag Version: 5.03.2600.2180 32bit Unicode

      ————
      DxDiag Notes
      ————
      DirectX Files Tab: No problems found.
      Display Tab 1: No problems found. DirectDraw test results: All tests were successful. Direct3D 7 test results: All tests were successful. Direct3D 8 test results: All tests were successful. Direct3D 9 test results: All tests were successful.
      Sound Tab 1: DirectSound test results: All tests were successful.
      Music Tab: DirectMusic test results: All tests were successful.
      Input Tab: No problems found.
      Network Tab: No problems found. DirectPlay test results: All tests were successful.

      ——————–
      DirectX Debug Levels
      ——————–
      Direct3D: 0/4 (n/a)
      DirectDraw: 0/4 (retail)
      DirectInput: 0/5 (n/a)
      DirectMusic: 0/5 (n/a)
      DirectPlay: 0/9 (retail)
      DirectSound: 0/5 (retail)
      DirectShow: 0/6 (retail)

      —————
      Display Devices
      —————
      Card name: 3dfx Voodoo3
      Manufacturer: 3dfx Interactive, Inc.
      Chip type: 3dfx Voodoo 3
      DAC type: 3dfx Internal DAC
      Device Key: Enum\PCI\VEN_121A&DEV_0005&SUBSYS_0060121A&REV_01
      Display Memory: 16.0 MB
      Current Mode: 1024 x 768 (32 bit) (60Hz)
      Monitor: Generic Television
      Monitor Max Res: 640,480
      Driver Name: 3dfxvs.dll
      Driver Version: 5.00.3545.0028 (English)
      DDI Version: 7
      Driver Attributes: Final Retail
      Driver Date/Size: 10/3/2001 14:47:04, 673728 bytes
      WHQL Logo’d: Yes
      WHQL Date Stamp: n/a
      VDD: n/a
      Mini VDD: 3dfxvsm.sys
      Mini VDD Date: 10/3/2001 14:47:04, 148352 bytes
      Device Identifier: {D7B71CFA-4345-11CF-B671-B92DAEC2C835}
      Vendor ID: 0x121A
      Device ID: 0x0005
      SubSys ID: 0x0060121A
      Revision ID: 0x0001
      Revision ID: 0x0001
      Video Accel:
      Deinterlace Caps: n/a
      Registry: OK
      DDraw Status: Enabled
      D3D Status: Enabled
      AGP Status: Not Available
      DDraw Test Result: All tests were successful.
      D3D7 Test Result: All tests were successful.
      D3D8 Test Result: All tests were successful.
      D3D9 Test Result: All tests were successful.

      ————-
      Sound Devices
      ————-
      Description: SB Live! Wave Device
      Default Sound Playback: Yes
      Default Voice Playback: Yes
      Hardware ID: PCI\VEN_1102&DEV_0002&SUBSYS_80641102&REV_07
      Manufacturer ID: 1
      Product ID: 100
      Type: WDM
      Driver Name: emu10k1m.sys
      Driver Version: 5.12.0001.3300 (English)
      Driver Attributes: Final Retail
      WHQL Logo’d: Yes
      Date and Size: 8/17/2001 08:19:26, 283904 bytes
      Other Files:
      Driver Provider: Microsoft
      HW Accel Level: Full
      Cap Flags: 0xF5F
      Min/Max Sample Rate: 5000, 100000
      Static/Strm HW Mix Bufs: 64, 62
      Static/Strm HW 3D Bufs: 64, 62
      HW Memory: 0
      Voice Management: Yes
      EAX(tm) 2.0 Listen/Src: Yes, Yes
      I3DL2(tm) Listen/Src: No, No
      Sensaura(tm) ZoomFX(tm): No
      Registry: OK
      Sound Test Result: All tests were successful.

      ———————
      Sound Capture Devices
      ———————
      Description: Camera
      Default Sound Capture: Yes
      Default Voice Capture: Yes
      Driver Name: usbaudio.sys
      Driver Version: 5.01.2600.2180 (English)
      Driver Attributes: Final Retail
      Date and Size: 8/4/2004 00:07:56, 59264 bytes
      Cap Flags: 0x41
      Format Flags: 0x44

      Description: SB Live! Wave Device
      Default Sound Capture: No
      Default Voice Capture: No
      Driver Name: emu10k1m.sys
      Driver Version: 5.12.0001.3300 (English)
      Driver Attributes: Final Retail
      Date and Size: 8/17/2001 08:19:26, 283904 bytes
      Cap Flags: 0x41
      Format Flags: 0xFFF

      ———–
      DirectMusic
      ———–
      DLS Path: C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32\drivers\GM.DLS
      DLS Version: 1.00.0016.0002
      Acceleration: n/a
      Ports: Microsoft Synthesizer, Software (Not Kernel Mode), Output, DLS, Internal, Default Port
      SB Live! MIDI UART, Hardware (Kernel Mode), Input, No DLS, External
      SB Live! MIDI UART, Hardware (Kernel Mode), Output, No DLS, External
      SB Live! Wave Device, Software (Kernel Mode), Output, DLS, Internal
      Microsoft MIDI Mapper [Emulated], Hardware (Not Kernel Mode), Output, No DLS, Internal
      B: SB Live! MIDI Synth [Emulated], Hardware (Not Kernel Mode), Output, No DLS, Internal
      A: SB Live! MIDI Synth [Emulated], Hardware (Not Kernel Mode), Output, No DLS, Internal
      SB Live! MIDI UART [Emulated], Hardware (Not Kernel Mode), Output, No DLS, External
      Microsoft GS Wavetable SW Synth [Emulated], Hardware (Not Kernel Mode), Output, No DLS, Internal
      SB Live! MIDI UART [Emulated], Hardware (Not Kernel Mode), Input, No DLS, External
      Registry: OK
      Test Result: All tests were successful.

      ——————-
      DirectInput Devices
      ——————-
      Device Name: Mouse
      Attached: 1
      Controller ID: n/a
      Vendor/Product ID: n/a
      FF Driver: n/a

      Device Name: Keyboard
      Attached: 1
      Controller ID: n/a
      Vendor/Product ID: n/a
      FF Driver: n/a

      Device Name: USB Hub/Keyboard
      Attached: 1
      Controller ID: 0x0
      Vendor/Product ID: 0x049F, 0x8000
      FF Driver: n/a

      Device Name: USB Hub/Keyboard
      Attached: 1
      Controller ID: 0x0
      Vendor/Product ID: 0x049F, 0x8000
      FF Driver: n/a

      Device Name: USB Hub/Keyboard
      Attached: 1
      Controller ID: 0x0
      Vendor/Product ID: 0x049F, 0x8000
      FF Driver: n/a

      Device Name: USB Hub/Keyboard
      Attached: 1
      Controller ID: 0x0
      Vendor/Product ID: 0x049F, 0x8000
      FF Driver: n/a

      Poll w/ Interrupt: No
      Registry: OK

      ———–
      USB Devices
      ———–
      + USB Root Hub
      | Vendor/Product ID: 0x10B9, 0x5237
      | Matching Device ID: usb\root_hub
      | Service: usbhub
      | Driver: usbhub.sys, 8/4/2004 00:08:44, 57600 bytes
      | Driver: usbd.sys, 9/6/2002 19:24:20, 4736 bytes
      |
      +-+ Generic USB Hub
      | | Vendor/Product ID: 0x049F, 0x8001
      | | Location: Generic USB Hub
      | | Matching Device ID: usb\class_09
      | | Service: usbhub
      | | Driver: usbhub.sys, 8/4/2004 00:08:44, 57600 bytes

      —————-
      Gameport Devices
      —————-
      + PCI bus
      | Matching Device ID: *pnp0a03
      | Service: pci
      | Driver: pci.sys, 8/4/2004 00:07:48, 68224 bytes
      |
      +-+ Creative SBLive! Gameport
      | | Location: PCI bus 0, device 9, function 1
      | | Matching Device ID: pci\ven_1102&dev_7002
      | | Lower Filters: ctljystk
      | | Service: gameenum
      | | Driver: gameenum.sys, 8/4/2004 00:08:22, 10624 bytes
      | | Driver: ctljystk.sys, 8/17/2001 08:19:20, 3712 bytes

      ————
      PS/2 Devices
      ————
      + Standard 101/102-Key or Microsoft Natural PS/2 Keyboard
      | Matching Device ID: *pnp0303
      | Service: i8042prt
      | Driver: i8042prt.sys, 8/4/2004 00:14:38, 52736 bytes
      | Driver: kbdclass.sys, 8/3/2004 23:58:34, 24576 bytes
      |
      + HID Keyboard Device
      | Vendor/Product ID: 0x049F, 0x8000
      | Matching Device ID: hid_device_system_keyboard
      | Service: kbdhid
      | Driver: kbdhid.sys, 8/3/2004 23:58:36, 14848 bytes
      | Driver: kbdclass.sys, 8/3/2004 23:58:34, 24576 bytes
      |
      + Terminal Server Keyboard Driver
      | Matching Device ID: root\rdp_kbd
      | Upper Filters: kbdclass
      | Service: TermDD
      | Driver: termdd.sys, 8/4/2004 02:01:08, 40840 bytes
      | Driver: kbdclass.sys, 8/3/2004 23:58:34, 24576 bytes
      |
      + PS/2 Compatible Mouse
      | Matching Device ID: *pnp0f13
      | Service: i8042prt
      | Driver: i8042prt.sys, 8/4/2004 00:14:38, 52736 bytes
      | Driver: mouclass.sys, 8/3/2004 23:58:34, 23040 bytes
      |
      + Terminal Server Mouse Driver
      | Matching Device ID: root\rdp_mou
      | Upper Filters: mouclass
      | Service: TermDD
      | Driver: termdd.sys, 8/4/2004 02:01:08, 40840 bytes
      | Driver: mouclass.sys, 8/3/2004 23:58:34, 23040 bytes

      —————————-
      DirectPlay Service Providers
      —————————-
      DirectPlay8 Modem Service Provider – Registry: OK, File: dpnet.dll (5.03.2600.2180)
      DirectPlay8 Serial Service Provider – Registry: OK, File: dpnet.dll (5.03.2600.2180)
      DirectPlay8 IPX Service Provider – Registry: OK, File: dpnet.dll (5.03.2600.2180)
      DirectPlay8 TCP/IP Service Provider – Registry: OK, File: dpnet.dll (5.03.2600.2180)
      Internet TCP/IP Connection For DirectPlay – Registry: OK, File: dpwsockx.dll (5.03.2600.2180)
      IPX Connection For DirectPlay – Registry: OK, File: dpwsockx.dll (5.03.2600.2180)
      Modem Connection For DirectPlay – Registry: OK, File: dpmodemx.dll (5.03.2600.2180)
      Serial Connection For DirectPlay – Registry: OK, File: dpmodemx.dll (5.03.2600.2180)

      DirectPlay Voice Wizard Tests: Full Duplex: Not run, Half Duplex: Not run, Mic: Not run
      DirectPlay Test Result: All tests were successful.
      Registry: OK

      ——————-
      DirectPlay Adapters
      ——————-
      DirectPlay8 Serial Service Provider: COM1
      DirectPlay8 Serial Service Provider: COM2
      DirectPlay8 TCP/IP Service Provider: Local Area Connection – IPv4 –

      ———————–
      DirectPlay Voice Codecs
      ———————–
      Voxware VR12 1.4kbit/s
      Voxware SC06 6.4kbit/s
      Voxware SC03 3.2kbit/s
      MS-PCM 64 kbit/s
      MS-ADPCM 32.8 kbit/s
      Microsoft GSM 6.10 13 kbit/s
      TrueSpeech(TM) 8.6 kbit/s

      ————————-
      DirectPlay Lobbyable Apps
      ————————-

      ————————
      Disk & DVD/CD-ROM Drives
      ————————
      Drive: C:
      Free Space: 0.5 GB
      Total Space: 4.1 GB
      File System: NTFS
      Model: Maxtor 4D080H4

      Drive: D:
      Free Space: 1.6 GB
      Total Space: 2.4 GB
      File System: FAT32
      Model: QUANTUM BIGFOOT2550A

      Drive: E:
      Free Space: 1.9 GB
      Total Space: 1.9 GB
      File System: FAT32
      Model: Maxtor 4D080H4

      Drive: F:
      Free Space: 2.0 GB
      Total Space: 2.0 GB
      File System: FAT32
      Model: Maxtor 4D080H4

      Drive: G:
      Free Space: 1.8 GB
      Total Space: 8.2 GB
      File System: FAT32
      Model: Maxtor 4D080H4

      Drive: H:
      Free Space: 1.5 GB
      Total Space: 2.0 GB
      File System: FAT32
      Model: Maxtor 4D080H4

      Drive: I:
      Free Space: 0.3 GB
      Total Space: 8.2 GB
      File System: FAT32
      Model: Maxtor 4D080H4

      Drive: J:
      Free Space: 5.3 GB
      Total Space: 8.2 GB
      File System: FAT32
      Model: Maxtor 4D080H4

      Drive: K:
      Free Space: 0.8 GB
      Total Space: 3.0 GB
      File System: FAT32
      Model: Maxtor 4D080H4

      Drive: L:
      Free Space: 10.7 GB
      Total Space: 40.4 GB
      File System: FAT32
      Model: Maxtor 4D080H4

      Drive: M:
      Free Space: 0.0 GB
      Total Space: 0.0 GB
      File System: FAT
      Model: QUANTUM BIGFOOT2550A

      Drive: N:
      Model: HL-DT-ST CD-RW GCE-8320B
      Driver: c:\windows\system32\drivers\cdrom.sys, 5.01.2600.2180 (English), 8/3/2004 23:59:54, 49536 bytes

      Drive: O:
      Model: ID E CD-ROM TY200SD
      Driver: c:\windows\system32\drivers\cdrom.sys, 5.01.2600.2180 (English), 8/3/2004 23:59:54, 49536 bytes

      ————–
      System Devices
      ————–
      Name: 3dfx Voodoo3
      Device ID: PCI\VEN_121A&DEV_0005&SUBSYS_0060121A&REV_01\4&1394949B&0&0008
      Driver: C:\WINDOWS\system32\DRIVERS\3dfxvsm.sys, 5.00.3545.0028 (English), 10/3/2001 14:47:04, 148352 bytes
      Driver: C:\WINDOWS\system32\3dfxvs.dll, 5.00.3545.0028 (English), 10/3/2001 14:47:04, 673728 bytes

      Name: Creative SBLive! Gameport
      Device ID: PCI\VEN_1102&DEV_7002&SUBSYS_00201102&REV_07\3&61AAA01&0&49
      Driver: C:\WINDOWS\system32\DRIVERS\gameenum.sys, 5.01.2600.2180 (English), 8/4/2004 00:08:22, 10624 bytes
      Driver: C:\WINDOWS\system32\drivers\ctljystk.sys, 5.01.2501.0000 (English), 8/17/2001 08:19:20, 3712 bytes

      Name: Creative SB Live! Series (WDM)
      Device ID: PCI\VEN_1102&DEV_0002&SUBSYS_80641102&REV_07\3&61AAA01&0&48
      Driver: n/a

      Name: Realtek RTL8029(AS)-based Ethernet Adapter (Generic)
      Device ID: PCI\VEN_10EC&DEV_8029&SUBSYS_00000000&REV_00\3&61AAA01&0&50
      Driver: C:\WINDOWS\system32\DRIVERS\RTL8029.sys, 5.508.0803.2000 (English), 8/17/2001 08:12:40, 19017 bytes

      Name: ALi 7101 Power Management Controller
      Device ID: PCI\VEN_10B9&DEV_7101&SUBSYS_710110B9&REV_00\3&61AAA01&0&18
      Driver: n/a

      Name: ALi M1541 PCI to AGP Controller
      Device ID: PCI\VEN_10B9&DEV_5243&SUBSYS_00000000&REV_04\3&61AAA01&0&08
      Driver: C:\WINDOWS\system32\DRIVERS\ALIM1541.SYS, 5.01.2600.2180 (English), 8/4/2004 00:07:42, 42752 bytes

      Name: ALi PCI to USB Open Host Controller
      Device ID: PCI\VEN_10B9&DEV_5237&SUBSYS_00000000&REV_03\3&61AAA01&0&10
      Driver: C:\WINDOWS\system32\drivers\usbohci.sys, 5.01.2600.2180 (English), 8/4/2004 00:08:38, 17024 bytes
      Driver: C:\WINDOWS\system32\drivers\usbport.sys, 5.01.2600.2180 (English), 8/4/2004 00:08:44, 142976 bytes
      Driver: C:\WINDOWS\system32\usbui.dll, 5.01.2600.2180 (English), 8/4/2004 01:56:48, 74240 bytes
      Driver: C:\WINDOWS\system32\drivers\usbhub.sys, 5.01.2600.2180 (English), 8/4/2004 00:08:44, 57600 bytes

      Name: ALi M5229 PCI Bus Master IDE Controller
      Device ID: PCI\VEN_10B9&DEV_5229&SUBSYS_00000000&REV_C1\3&61AAA01&0&78
      Driver: C:\WINDOWS\system32\DRIVERS\pciidex.sys, 5.01.2600.2180 (English), 8/3/2004 23:59:42, 25088 bytes
      Driver: C:\WINDOWS\system32\DRIVERS\atapi.sys, 5.01.2600.2180 (English), 8/3/2004 23:59:44, 95360 bytes
      Driver: C:\WINDOWS\system32\DRIVERS\aliide.sys, 1.02.0000.0000 (English), 9/6/2002 19:24:20, 5248 bytes

      Name: ALi M1541 CPU to PCI bridge
      Device ID: PCI\VEN_10B9&DEV_1541&SUBSYS_00000000&REV_04\3&61AAA01&0&00
      Driver: n/a

      Name: ALi PCI to ISA bridge
      Device ID: PCI\VEN_10B9&DEV_1533&SUBSYS_00000000&REV_C3\3&61AAA01&0&38
      Driver: C:\WINDOWS\system32\DRIVERS\isapnp.sys, 5.01.2600.0000 (English), 9/6/2002 19:24:20, 35840 bytes

    • #3235762

      What I use to protect my computer from mal-ware

      by bob21 ·

      In reply to Bob’s Blog

      1. Windows XP service pack 2 with firewall enabled
      2. AVG7.0.322, http://www.grisoft.com/doc/1
      3. SpywareBlaster v3.4, http://www.javacoolsoftware.com/index.html
      4. Spybot – Search & Destroy v1.3, http://www.safer-networking.org/en/download/
      5. Lavasoft Ad-Aware SE Personal build 1.05, http://www.lavasoft.de/
      6. Intermute CoolWeb Search Shredder v2.14, http://www.intermute.com/
      7. Microsoft AntiSpyware Beta 1 (v1.0.501), http://www.microsoft.com/athome/security/spyware/software/default.mspx
      8. MS Windows Malicious Software Removal Tool (KB890830) v1.4 (2005-05-10), http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyId=AD724AE0-E72D-4F54-9AB3-75B8EB148356&displaylang=en
      9. Microsoft Baseline Security Analyzer 1.2.1 (1.2.4013.0),

      I am currently testing
      1. PC Tools Registry Mechanic v4.0.0.101, http://www.pctools.com/registry-mechanic/
      2. InterMute Inc SpySubtract MD, http://www.intermute.com/spysubtract/free_spyware_scan.html

    • #3181761

      About RSS

      by bob21 ·

      In reply to Bob’s Blog

      The first time I have been aware of RSS was reading the information about setting up a blog here on TechRep.

      The second time was news today about a conflict between IE and Netscape8 over RSS and XML  See ZD Net report http://msn.com.com/Microsoft+advises+IE+users+to+uninstall+Netscape+8/2100-9588_22-5721852.html?part=msn&tag=tg_nav&subj=ns_5721852 .  Dave Massy, a senior program manager for IE, warned users in a blog posting that after installing Netscape 8, IE will render XML files as a blank page, including XML files that have an XSLT transformation.

      So I am looking for info about RSS and how to use it.  Here is something from MS. 

      (Source URL:  http://msdn.microsoft.com/aboutmsdn/rss/   )

      What Is RSS?

      RSS (Really Simple Syndication) provides a convenient way to syndicate information from a variety of sources, including news stories, updates to a web site or even source code check-ins for a development project. Regardless of the purpose for which the RSS file is being used, by watching this XML file, you can quickly and easily see whenever an update has occurred. Of course, viewing the RSS feed in Internet Explorer and hitting F5 every few minutes is not the most efficient use of your time, so most people take advantage of some form of client software to read and monitor RSS feeds.

      There are many different RSS clients available, but here are a selected few that we tested our feeds with and that you may find useful:

      If you’re using Microsoft SharePoint, you can get the MSDN Headlines feed delivered to your SharePoint site using Tim Heuer’s RSS Reader Web Part.

      Whenever you see this (or most often ) it should link to an RSS feed that you can subscribe to via your RSS client.

    • #3181719

      Comment I posted on the MS IE Blog

      by bob21 ·

      In reply to Bob’s Blog

      from:  http://blogs.msdn.com/ie/archive/2005/05/25/421763.aspx#422357

      # re: Netscape 8 and Internet Explorer’s XML Rendering @ Thursday, May 26, 2005 8:10 PM

      I have been having so much trouble with IE lately. Pages load so slowly that they often time out and I have to refresh repeatedly to get them. At one point IE would not even access the net, although e-mail and program updates that didn’t use IE worked fine. I had to install Netscape to get internet access. (I had an old install package in my download directory.) I haven’t yet noticed blank pages in IE (which I am using at this moment) since installing Netscape, but if I do, I guess it will be IE that I remove.

      I have lots of mal-ware programs installed and running. I recently re-installed XP and SP 2, and everything is updated to the hilt, including IE.

      Bob

       

      It turns out I am using Netscape 6.  I guess some of my download files are a bit out of date.  But maybe that’s a good thing.  At least I had something available that worked when I needed it.  In any case I followed the links to Mozilla and downloaded the packages for Mozilla, Firefox, and Thunderbird for both Windows and Linux.  They are not installed yet, but are available in case of trouble.

    • #3180443

      MS TechNet 5 Minute Security Advisor

      by bob21 ·

      In reply to Bob’s Blog

      Some good tips here, in easy to digest bites.

      MS TechNet 5 Minute Security Advisor 

      http://www.microsoft.com/technet/archive/community/columns/security/5min/default.mspx

    • #3180442

      pif files and XP: search of MS Knowldge base

      by bob21 ·

      In reply to Bob’s Blog

      These are the potentially useful hits I got.  I will check them out and comment later.

      Search results for  {?pif file? XP} in MS Knowledgebase:  http://search.microsoft.com/search/results.aspx?View=msdn&p=1&c=10&st=a&qu=%22pif+file%22+XP&na=32&cm=512

      1.       Microsoft Windows XP – Using PIF files
      A program information file (PIF) is created when you create a shortcut to, or modify the properties of, an MS-DOS-based program. PIFs allow you to set default properties for MS-DOS programs, such as font size, screen colors, and memory allocation.
      http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/windows/xp/all/proddocs/en-us/windows_pif_create.mspx

      2.       Microsoft Windows XP – Create or change a PIF
      Prior to creating or making changes to the PIF, please review the MS-DOS-based program documentation. Changing the PIF affects how the program interacts with Windows. The program might only work correctly with specific default settings.
      http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/windows/xp/all/proddocs/en-us/windows_dos_configure.mspx

      3.       PifMgr_OpenProperties Function (Windows Explorer and Controls)
      Opens the .pif file associated with a Microsoft MS-DOS application and returns a handle to the application's properties.
      http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en-us/shellcc/platform/shell/reference/functions/pifmgr_openproperties.asp

      4.       GetBinaryType(LPCTSTR,LPDWORD) function [Files]
      Determines whether a file is executable, and if so, what type of executable file it is.
      http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en-us/fileio/fs/getbinarytype.asp

      5.        Microsoft Windows XP – MS-DOS overview
      MS-DOS, the acronym for Microsoft Disk Operating System, is an operating system with a command-line interface used on personal computers.
      http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/windows/xp/all/proddocs/en-us/windows_dos_overview.mspx

      6.       Microsoft Windows XP – Specify custom startup files for MS-DOS-based programs
      Please consult the documentation that came with the MS-DOS-based program before performing this procedure. Open My Computer Locate the MS-DOS-based program (.exe) file, the program information file (.pif), or the shortcut you want to change.
      http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/windows/xp/all/proddocs/en-us/windows_dos_specify_cust_start.mspx

      7.       Microsoft Windows XP – Allocate system resources for an MS-DOS-based program
      Open My Computer Locate the MS-DOS-based program (.exe) file, the program information file (PIF), or shortcut you want to change. Please refer to the documentation that came with the program for the actual file name.
      http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/windows/xp/all/proddocs/en-us/windows_dos_multitask.mspx

      8.       MS-DOS overview
      MS-DOS overview MS-DOS, the acronym for Microsoft Disk Operating System, is an operating system with a command-line interface used on personal computers. As with other operating systems such as OS/2 , it translates keyboard input by the user into operations the computer can
      http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/home/using/productdoc/en/windows_dos_overview.asp

      9.       Microsoft Windows XP – Dosonly
      Prevents users from starting applications other than MS-DOS-based applications from the Command.com prompt. Syntax dosonly Parameters none Remarks When you exit an MS-DOS-based application, Windows XP returns to the command interpreter, Cmd.exe.
      http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/windows/xp/all/proddocs/en-us/dosonly.mspx

      10.   Microsoft Windows XP – Create custom startup files for an MS-DOS-based program
      Using a text editor, such as Notepad, edit the Config.nt and Autoexec.nt files (located in systemroot\System32). Save each file with a new name. Right-click the MS-DOS-based program shortcut, and then click Properties.
      http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/windows/xp/all/proddocs/en-us/windows_dos_custom_startup.mspx

      11.   Microsoft Windows XP – Set up two shortcuts for an MS-DOS program
      Open My Computer Locate the MS-DOS-based program (.exe) file, the program information file (.pif), or the shortcut you want to change. Right-click the file and click Create Shortcut.
      http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/windows/xp/all/proddocs/en-us/windows_dos_two_pifs.mspx

      12.   Dosonly
      Describes how to use the dosonly command at the command line.
      http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/home/using/productdoc/en/dosonly.asp

      13.   Microsoft Windows XP – Ntcmdprompt
      Runs the command interpreter Cmd.exe, rather than Command.com, after running a TSR or after starting the command prompt from within an MS-DOS application. Syntax ntcmdprompt Parameters /? Displays help at the command prompt.
      http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/windows/xp/all/proddocs/en-us/ntcmdprompt.mspx

      14.   Microsoft Windows XP – Reserve shortcut keys for MS-DOS-based programs
      Open My Computer Locate the MS-DOS-based program (.exe) file, the program information file (.pif), or shortcut you want to change. Right-click the file, and then click Properties. In the Properties dialog box, click the Misc tab.
      http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/windows/xp/all/proddocs/en-us/windows_dos_reserve_shortcut.mspx

      15.   Microsoft Windows XP – Specify shortcut keys
      Before beginning this procedure, please refer to the documentation that came with the program to verify a shortcut was installed. Open My Computer Locate the program file (.exe) or the program’s shortcut icon.
      http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/windows/xp/all/proddocs/en-us/windows_dos_specify_shortcut.mspx

      16.   Dosonly
      Dosonly
      http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/windowsserver2003/library/ServerHelp/8a3e04d6-ef2c-4797-8ec5-32aec9d3f6b7.mspx

      17.   Command Completion
      How to Enable Automatic Complete for the Command Prompt
      http://www.microsoft.com/technet/archive/community/columns/tipsfortechs/cmcompt.mspx

      18.   Windows XP Best of the Newsgroups – Archive
      This page contains questions and answers from the Windows XP public newsgroups.
      http://www.microsoft.com/technet/archive/community/columns/bong/winxppro/wxparch.mspx

      19.   Microsoft TechNet: Editor’s Note about Content Layout, August 2001
      Find and focus on the information you need. Share your thoughts on content layout with the editor.
      http://www.microsoft.com/technet/archive/community/columns/ednote/en082701.mspx

       

    • #3180418

      AutoCAD 11 in Windows XP

      by bob21 ·

      In reply to Bob’s Blog

      I want to relearn AutoCAD again.  I have not used it for 10 to 15 years.   So I dug out the old 1.44 Mb floppies and installed both the DOS and Windows versions of AutoCAD 11.  To see how old these are, I noted in the ?readme? files that the DOS version should be 3.0 or better.  The Windows version operates on Win 3.0.  It was also tested on a beta version of Win 3.1.   But these versions should be enough to get me back into the swing of computer drafting.  Then I?ll be able to switch more easily to the latest, when or if I get the chance.

      I used to run them on Win 95, and possibly 98 & SE, but probably not Me.

      The Windows version runs in XP.  I can see that I have a lot to re-learn.

      However in XP, the DOS version opens in a DOS window, flashes through several lines of text, and closes the window before I can read what was happening to know how to fix whatever s wrong.  In Win 9.x we used pif files to control the operating environment and the DOS window the program was running in.   I don?t remember how one got set up.  I can?t find a blank or standard pif file in XP.   For some DOS files the pif configuration seems to be available in the properties.  But not for acad.exe or the acad386.bat file.

      So that is why I have embarked on a search for info on pif in XP.

      • #3190190

        AutoCAD 11 in Windows XP

        by daniel.muzrall ·

        In reply to AutoCAD 11 in Windows XP

        I’ve run into a similar issue running the DOS version of AutoCAD r12 on Windows 2000.  Despite a host of attempts to get it to run in any fashion within Windows, it just wouldn’t work.  What I ended up doing was creating a a FAT32 partition on the user’s hard drive, and then giving him a Win95 boot disk set up with network support (thanks Bart Network Boot Disk!).  My suggestion at this point is to either stick with the Windows version, or buy a current version of AutoCAD or AutoCAD LT. 

        Best of luck to you!

      • #3190159

        AutoCAD 11 in Windows XP

        by cwdunn ·

        In reply to AutoCAD 11 in Windows XP

        The more the operating systems progress, the harder it will be to get these older programs to work. If you are still trying to use AutoCAD 11 then you are missing out on a lot of new features. I have upgraded to AutoCAD 2006 recently and the program is awesome. A lot of the old commands can still be run in this version, plus it is totally compatible with XP. You should have no problem learning the new AutoCAD with the old commands. If you are dead set on runnning AutoCAD 11, then you should invest in another system (an older one perhaps), load Windows 95, or 98, on it and leave the XP OS alone.

      • #3188596

        AutoCAD 11 in Windows XP

        by tr ·

        In reply to AutoCAD 11 in Windows XP

        Well, as you’re quite a few years past the time that you can upgrade
        Release 11 to anything else, you’re pretty well stuck with having to
        buy a new copy, if you want to use all the myriad new features. You
        won’t be able to use the DOS version of AutoCAD R11 because Windows
        XP’s DOS compatibility simply isn’t the same as Windows 3.X. PIFs will
        only go so far in controlling DOS calls….

        You “might” stand a chance of getting it operation in XP Pro, but only
        if your hard-drive is formatted as FAT32; the kernel & APIs in R11
        have no idea what NTFS is. An even better solution is to find one of
        your old Pentium systems that will run DOS & Windows 3.11, load
        AutoCAD R11, & then crank it up. That will allow you to relearn the
        old (but still viable) command set.

        From: AutoCAD dealer/developer/author

      • #3188590

        AutoCAD 11 in Windows XP

        by mikael310 ·

        In reply to AutoCAD 11 in Windows XP

        Ask yourself, if Microsoft doesn’t support Win3x, why should you?

        If you truely are serious about relearning AutoCAD, here’s some suggestions:
         Upgrade your O/S, upgrade your knowledge-base (i.e.: classes,
        books, Internet), upgrade your AutoCAD.  The fundamentals of drafting
        haven’t changed. Try out MS Visio to start with if your afraid of the latest AutoCAD. Quit trying to revive a dinosaur!

      • #3188485

        AutoCAD 11 in Windows XP

        by petremure ·

        In reply to AutoCAD 11 in Windows XP

        You should try to run CAD11 in a virtual pc with win95 os setup. Peter.

      • #3188460

        AutoCAD 11 in Windows XP

        by stanjermar ·

        In reply to AutoCAD 11 in Windows XP

        Try DOSBox for Windows from Perfect Sync: http://perfectsync.com/DOSBox.htm

        Stan

      • #3188416

        AutoCAD 11 in Windows XP

        by mikael310 ·

        In reply to AutoCAD 11 in Windows XP

        Ask yourself, if Microsoft doesn’t support Win3x, why should you?

        If you truely are serious about relearning AutoCAD, here’s some suggestions:
         Upgrade your O/S, upgrade your knowledge-base (i.e.: classes,
        books, Internet), upgrade your AutoCAD.  The fundamentals of drafting
        haven’t changed. Try out MS Visio to start with if your afraid of the latest AutoCAD. Quit trying to revive a dinosaur!

      • #3190426

        AutoCAD 11 in Windows XP

        by mikael310 ·

        In reply to AutoCAD 11 in Windows XP

        Ask yourself, if Microsoft doesn’t support Win3x, why should you?

        If you truely are serious about relearning AutoCAD, here’s some suggestions:
         Upgrade your O/S, upgrade your knowledge-base (i.e.: classes,
        books, Internet), upgrade your AutoCAD.  The fundamentals of drafting
        haven’t changed. Try out MS Visio to start with if your afraid of the latest AutoCAD. Quit trying to revive a dinosaur!

      • #3051790

        AutoCAD 11 in Windows XP

        by jaypeebee ·

        In reply to AutoCAD 11 in Windows XP

        Hi, as long as i can remember. When autodesk as been bought by microsoft,about 1996, there was some extensions files names identical, like *.dwl or/and *.pwl. Powerlock in autocad was a very important file to launch it.Some times,when a crash occured in autocad, you had to copy your backup file (*.pwl) from, if you made a backup copy …. I know that this comment may not help you but, in that time it was a problem to start autocad under windows session or else.

        To All, let me know if my memory fail …

    • #3179356

      What I have found about pif files and running DOS programs in XP

      by bob21 ·

      In reply to Bob’s Blog

      This post is a work in progress untill I remove this notice.

       

      The following is compiled from the Microsoft Knowledgebase from the locations showed in the bluecoloured URL?s.  The green hyperlinks link to areas of the document, at least in Word.  I don?t know how they will work when pasted into a blog or e-mail.   My own comments and observations are in [square brackets].

      1.   Using PIF files           http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/windows/xp/all/proddocs/en-us/windows_pif_create.mspx

      A program information file (PIF) is created when you create a shortcut to, or modify the properties of, an MS-DOS-based program. PIFs allow you to set default properties for MS-DOS programs, such as font size, screen colors, and memory allocation.

      When you change any settings in an MS-DOS-based program, a PIF is automatically created. The settings you specify will be used each time you start the program by double-clicking its icon. If you start the program from a command prompt window, these settings won’t be used.

      Creating a program information file (PIF) for an MS-DOS-based program creates a shortcut to the program executable. All the settings saved in the PIF file are contained in the shortcut. Windows displays PIF files as shortcuts.  The Properties dialog box has replaced the PIF Editor used in earlier versions of Windows.

      [So when you right click and open Properties of an exe, bat, com, etc file, a shortcut appears in the same directory as the file.  The tabs under properties aren’t always the same for some reason still to be discovered.]

      Create or change a PIF

      Specify shortcut keys

      Create custom startup files for an MS-DOS-based program

      Reserve shortcut keys

      Specify custom startup files for MS-DOS-based programs

      Allocate system resources for an MS-DOS-based program

      Open MS-DOS program from command prompt window

      Change command prompt window Edit Options settings

      MS-DOS overview

      Copy text from a command prompt window

      Display Help for an MS-DOS command

      Copy and paste MS-DOS text using the mouse

      Related Topics

      `

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      To create or change a program information file (PIF)                                    Create or change a PIF

      Prior to creating or making changes to the PIF, please review the MS-DOS-based program documentation. Changing the PIF affects how the program interacts with Windows. The program might only work correctly with specific default settings.

      1.

      Open My Computer                                                                                                  See Note:   To open My Computer  

      2.

      Do one of the following:

      ?

      If you want to create a program information file (PIF) for a program, locate the program and right-click it. Then click Properties and change the default settings to match the program requirements.

      ?

      If you want to change the settings of an existing PIF file, locate the shortcut to the program file and right-click it. Click Properties and make the appropriate changes.

      Notes

      ?

      See:   Using PIF files   above.

      ?

      To specify whether an MS-DOS-based program starts in a full screen or in a window, change the Run properties on the Program (or Shortcut) tab.

      ?

      To view MS-DOS-based program output on the screen faster, after clicking Properties in step 2, on the Screen tab, select Fast ROM emulation under Performance. Please review the documentation that came with your video card to ensure it supports Fast ROM emulation.

      ?

      To increase the performance of the MS-DOS-based program, you can allocate more memory. To make this change, after clicking Properties in step 2, on the Memory tab, set Expanded (EMS) memory or Extended (XMS) memory to Auto, and no limit will be imposed. If you experience program errors, set the value in the Total window to 8192. For more information, click Related Topics

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      To specify shortcut keys for specific programs                                       Specify shortcut keys

      Before beginning this procedure, please refer to the documentation that came with the program to verify a shortcut was installed.

      1.

      Open My Computer                                                                                                    See Note:   To open My Computer

      2.

      Locate the program file (.exe) or the program’s shortcut icon. Right-click the program file or shortcut, and then click Properties.

      3.

      Click the Program tab for an MS-DOS program or the Shortcut tab for a Windows program.

      4.

      With the cursor in the Shortcut key box, select the keyboard key you want to use in combination with CTRL+ALT. Shortcut keys automatically start with CTRL+ALT. The Shortcut key box will display None until you select the key and then the box will display Ctrl+Alt+the key you selected. You cannot use the ESC, ENTER, TAB, SPACEBAR, PRINT SCREEN, SHIFT, or BACKSPACE keys.

      Note

      ?

      Once you assign a shortcut key combination for a specific program, you will not be able to use that key combination with other programs. For a list of shortcut keys used by this version of Windows, see Related Topics.

      ?

      If you forget the key combination for your shortcut, you can follow steps 2 through 3 and review your shortcut keys.

      ?

      Using shortcut keys to open programs can often be simpler than opening programs using a pointing device, especially when working on portable computers.

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      To reserve shortcut keys for MS-DOS-based programsReserve shortcut keys for MS-DOS-based programs

      1.

      Open My Computer                                                                                                          See Note:   To open My Computer

      2.

      Locate the MS-DOS-based program (.exe) file, the program information file (.pif), or shortcut you want to change. Right-click the file, and then click Properties.

      3.

      In the Properties dialog box, click the Misc tab.

      4.

      Under Windows Shortcut Keys,  clear the check box next to the shortcut keys combination the MS-DOS program uses. When you clear the check box, Windows will ignore the shortcut key when the MS-DOS-based program is in use.

      You can reserve only the following shortcut keys for an MS-DOS-based program:

      ?

      ALT+ESC

      ?

      PRINT SCREEN

      ?

      ALT+TAB

      ?

      ALT+ENTER

      ?

      CTRL+ESC

      ?

      ALT+PRINT SCREEN

      ?

      ALT+SPACEBAR

      ?

      Note

      ?

      This option might not be available in some MS-DOS-based programs.

      ?

      Some MS-DOS-based programs require the use of keystroke combinations (pressing the keys at the same time) for specific functions.

      ?

      You might need to reserve shortcut keys for MS-DOS-based programs if the program uses the same shortcut keys as Windows. For example, if your MS-DOS-based program uses ALT+TAB to perform a command, Windows might intercept that command and switch between programs instead. (In Windows, you press ALT+TAB to switch between programs.)

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      To create custom startup files for an MS-DOS-based program that may require a special configuration                                                     Create custom startup files for an MS-DOS-based program

      1.

      Using a text editor, such as Notepad, edit the Config.nt and Autoexec.nt files (located in systemroot\System32).

      2.

      Save each file with a new name.

      3.

      Right-click the MS-DOS-based program shortcut, and then click Properties.

      4.

      Click the Program tab, and then click Advanced.

      5.

      Under Custom MS-DOS initialization files, type the new names for your custom startup files.

      Note

      ?

      This procedure might be required because some MS-DOS programs use special memory and video instructions, or require that other programs be installed prior to their being started. Please refer to the documentation that came with the program before creating startup files.

      ?

      Use the documentation that came with the MS-DOS-based program to create a shortcut For more information, click Related Topics

      ?

      This option might not be available on some MS-DOS-based programs.

      ?

      To use custom startup files when starting an MS-DOS-based program, you must start the program from its shortcut.

      ?

      See:   Using PIF files   above.

       

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      To specify custom startup files for MS-DOS-based programsSpecify custom startup files for MS-DOS-based programs

      Please consult the documentation that came with the MS-DOS-based program before performing this procedure.

      1.

      Open My Computer                                                                                                  See Note:   To open My Computer

      2.

      Locate the MS-DOS-based program (.exe) file, the program information file (.pif), or the shortcut you want to change.

      3.

      Right-click the program (.exe) file, program information file, or shortcut, and then click Properties.

      4.

      Click the Program tab.

      5.

      In Cmd line, type the name of the program.

      6.

      Click Advanced.

      7.

      Type the names of the custom startup files you created.

      Note

      ?

      This option is only available in some MS-DOS programs.

      ?

      See:   Using PIF files   above.

       

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      To allocate system resources for an MS-DOS-based program and change its idle time                                                                              Allocate system resources for an MS-DOS-based program

      1.

      Open My Computer                                                                                                 See Note:   To open My Computer

      2.

      Locate the MS-DOS-based program (.exe) file, the program information file (PIF), or shortcut you want to change. Please refer to the documentation that came with the program for the actual file name.

      3.

      Right-click the icon, and then click Properties.

      4.

      In Properties, click the Misc tab.

      5.

      Adjust the Idle sensitivity slider as follows:

      ?

      To give a background program more resources, move the slider toward Low.

      ?

      To give a background program fewer resources, move the slider toward High.

      Note

      ?

      You can specify how long an MS-DOS-based program will remain idle before reducing its computer resource allocation so that other programs can use the resources.

      ?

      This option might not be available in some MS-DOS-based programs.

      ?

      See:   Using PIF files   above.

       

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      MS-DOS overview                                                                                                MS-DOS overview

      MS-DOS, the acronym for Microsoft Disk Operating System, is an operating system with a command-line interface used on personal computers. As with other operating systems such as OS/2, it translates keyboard input by the user into operations the computer can perform, it also oversees operations such as disk input and output, video support, keyboard control, and many internal functions related to program execution and file maintenance.

      You type MS-DOS commands using a command prompt window. To end your MS-DOS session, type exit in the command prompt window at the blinking cursor.

      The MS-DOS mode is a shell in which the MS-DOS environment is emulated in 32-bit systems, such as Windows. MS-DOS-based programs can run with Windows and might create a program information file (PIF) which appears as a shortcut on your desktop.  See:   Using PIF files   above.

      Open Command Prompt                                                                                              See:  To open command prompt

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      To display Help for an MS-DOS command                                Display Help for an MS-DOS command

      1.

      Open Command Prompt                                                                                           See Note:   To open My Computer

      2.

      At the command prompt, type the name of the command you want help on, followed by /?.

      For example, type chdir /? to get Help on the chdir command.

      Note

      ?

      To display Help one screen at a time, type the command followed by | more. For example, type dir /? | more for Help on the dir command.

       

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      To open an MS-DOS program from a command prompt windowOpen an MS-DOS program from a command prompt window

      1.

      Open Command Prompt                                                                                             See:  To open command prompt

      2.

      Type the name of the installed MS-DOS-based program you want to open, and then press ENTER. Or, change to the directory where the program is located and type its name there.

      Note

      ?

      To switch between a full screen and a window, press ALT+ENTER.

      ?

      To quit a command prompt session, type exit at the blinking cursor in the command prompt window.

       

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      To copy text from a command prompt window                    Copy text from a command prompt window

      1.

      Open Command Prompt                                                                                             See:  To open command prompt

      2.

      Right-click the title bar of the command prompt window, point to Edit, and then click Mark.

      3.

      Click the beginning of the text you want to copy.

      4.

      Press and hold down the SHIFT key, and then click the end of the text you want to copy (or you can click and drag the cursor to select the text).

      5.

      Right-click the title bar, point to Edit, and then click Copy.

      6.

      Position the cursor where you want the text to be inserted:

      ?

      In an MS-DOS-based program, or in a command prompt window, right-click the title bar, point to Edit, and then click Paste.

      ?

      In a Windows-based program, click the Edit menu, and then click Paste.

      Note

      ?

      You cannot paste text into a command prompt window or MS-DOS-based program when it is running in a full screen. For more information, click Related Topics or see the following. 

       

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      To copy and paste MS-DOS text using the mouse             Copy and paste MS-DOS text using the mouse

      1.

      Open Command Prompt                                                                                             See:  To open command prompt

      2.

      Right-click the title bar of the command prompt window, and then click Properties.

      3.

      On the Options tab, under Edit Options, select the QuickEdit Mode check box if it isn’t already selected, and then click OK.

      4.

      In the Apply Properties To Shortcut dialog box, click either of the following:

      ?

      Apply properties to current wi

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