General discussion

Locked

Built up pressure

By Db0 ·
Recently I've started getting more and more disappointed by the status quo of my work. But let me become a bit more specific.

I am a new IT pro (just over 3 years in the business) but with lots of personal experience and enthusiasm. I do not claim to know everything but I learn fast. My current job for the past 2+ years is as an Network and Systems Administrator supporting a native Windows 2000 domain.

Now I will be the first to admit that I didn't know much about it when I first started working but I believe I now can support the whole domain on my own adequately.
Part of my work includes supporting software, hardware (even hardware that fall outside the scope of IT such as photocopiers and faxes) and helldesk and I can fix most problems that occur on my own, very fast (others' thoughts, not mine).
Due to the nature of my work I often end up doing nothing specific for days. This "free" time I use for research and deployment of various projects I pick up myself (for example I recently set up a working Jabber2 server on a spare machine that worked flawlessly) or for lack of nothing better to do, idly surf sites (such as this).
In general I feel that I contribute enough.

My general pay for the last 2 years (which started from the base minimum) has risen by about 12% and things have started happening that are making me question my dedication to the company.

A few weeks ago we had a major problem on the AD and as a result I had to work quite a few hours overtime each day for a month or so. I never complained because these things happen. The problem however occured now that things have calmed down a bit. I asked my supervisor the dreaded question: "What about all those hours?" to which he replied that these things happen and are part of the work and also I have no right to ask for overtime becuase I always leave on schedule and I spend a lot of time idling in my desk.
Nevermind the fact that there is no reason to stay overtime on normal days or that I (seem to be)idle because there is nothing to do...

Needless to say that this upset me quite a bit, not only because I wouldn't be paid but because in one sentence he downgraded all my work.

I'd like to hear what more experienced IT pros than me would react this situation.
Should I start looking for another work, something which pays adequately (because, frankly, 12% over the base minimum is lower than anyone I know) and I have true Admin rights (right now I'm treated more like a helper)?
Or should I stay where I am so I can have time to learn more stuff on my own and in a more relaxed enviroment (I can come in late, casual wear).

What should my threshold be?
Where would you draw the line?

This conversation is currently closed to new comments.

24 total posts (Page 1 of 3)   01 | 02 | 03   Next
| Thread display: Collapse - | Expand +

All Comments

Collapse -

by jkameleon In reply to Built up pressure

> Part of my work includes supporting software, hardware (even hardware that fall outside the scope of IT such as photocopiers and faxes)

If supporting stuff outside scope of IT is not in your job description, you are doing a serious mistake. You'll never get paid for this in any form. Blame for everything that goes wrong with that stuff is all you'll get in return.

The iron rule of IT is: NEVER NEVER NEVER mess with anything you are not responsible for.


> Due to the nature of my work I often end up doing nothing specific for days.

A young fellow just left my company for this reason recently. His boss gave him a farewell gift: a pair of deluxe stainless steel stress relief balls.


> I asked my supervisor the dreaded question: "What about all those hours?" to which he replied that these things happen and are part of the work and also I have no right to ask for overtime becuase I always leave on schedule and I spend a lot of time idling in my desk.

That was unfair, to say the least. If the nature of your work requires you to wait at your desk waiting for problem to appear, he shouldn't reproach you with this.


> Needless to say that this upset me quite a bit, not only because I wouldn't be paid but because in one sentence he downgraded all my work.

You shouldn't be upset by such things. The only thing you should be upset about is verbal appreciation of your work if it's not accompanied by $$$.


> (I can come in late, casual wear).

Whoops! If you can come in late, you shouldn't mind a couple of hours overtime now and then, should you? So, your employer is not that unfair after all. If I was your superior, I'd rather mention that to you instead of unavoidable idling at your desk. I suggest you try to clarify theese things, if you can.


> Where would you draw the line?

This line can be drawn by you only. It depends on what you want. Do you want to work in a casual, relaxed environment, or make some money?

Collapse -

Forgot to mention

by Db0 In reply to

>Whoops! If you can come in late, you shouldn't mind a couple of hours overtime now and then, should you? So, your employer is not that unfair after all. If I was your superior, I'd rather mention that to you instead of unavoidable idling at your desk. I suggest you try to clarify theese things, if you can.

I forgot to mention that I usually leave 10-15 minutes later every day. When and if I come late I do so by about 10-15 minutes.
I thought it pretty much balances out in the end.

Collapse -

by jkameleon In reply to Forgot to mention

> I forgot to mention that I usually leave 10-15 minutes later every day. When and if I come late I do so by about 10-15 minutes.

> I thought it pretty much balances out in the end.

I presume, that nobody records your time on the job. You have each & every opportunity to balance that overtime as well.

Your employer has obviously fixed sum of money prepared for the job you do. I think it would be very helpful if you find out what exactly is expected from you for this money, and get it done. If your job description is uclear, however, well... relaxed job environment usually goes both ways.

Collapse -

But why

by CuteElf In reply to Built up pressure

Are you idle?

Thats what bothers me.


As to your question:
You can only request what you feel you are worth. When was the last time you sat down with yourself & researched your duties vs. your pay?

If your pay does not reflect what a pay range would be with the same duties, you need to ask:
Why am I getting paid less?

What can I do to make more money (if that's what you want)?

Who do I talk to about improving this?

Is it really yourself not getting paid enough because you havent spoken for it....or is your company not paying you because they dont think you're worth the money?

Some things I would do:

Change dress. Dress for the pay you want, not what you get. Period.

Start studying more. Besides having a test lab, do you do any experiments?

Do an audit. When's the last time an audit was done on your network? From ground up.....layer 1 and up!

Make an appt with your boss later..and ask What can I do to improve my work? I think I do ok at X, what do you think? What about Y? Y isnt so good, can you steer me to a person/place I can learn Y at better?

If you dont want to do these: get another job.

If you do want to do these: it may take you another 6 mos but you may get another raise. And you'd show growth, ambition, learning, and attitude...which will go towards the job you have lined up in a year.

Never ever let yourself feel ....stale. If you start feeling stale, do something to wake up!

CuteElf

Collapse -

Why am I idle?

by TonytheTiger In reply to But why

I'm not idle, I'm monitoring the system :)

Collapse -

Because

by Db0 In reply to But why

I can only react to problems. You can only do so much preventative work (and sometimes I don't even have enough rights to do so)

>You can only request what you feel you are worth.
When was the last time you sat down with yourself & researched your duties vs. your pay?

That's a question I am unqualified to answer. Some help on this matter would be appreciated. What should the pay for someone who can set-up and support Windows 98-xp, Servers, AD Domain and Exchange 2000 along with Citrix, ERP and Logistics programs while manning the helldesk (Soft and Hard) and doing R&amp on Linux solutions, security and even Web Design on the side? I'd like to think that it would be more than 12% over the base minimum...


>Change dress. Dress for the pay you want, not what you get. Period.

This is on of the few things I am unwilling to do.

>Start studying more. Besides having a test lab, do you do any experiments?

I don't even have a testlab. Moreso I have a huge overhead most of the time, what with manning helldesk and doing the odd task that is assigned to me. The only reason why I am able to experiment /research is because I tend to finish what I do very fast. Call it a knack for finsing the quickest solution.
What research I do is mostly on Linux and I have even initiated some ambitious projects.

>Do an audit. When's the last time an audit was done on your network? From ground up.....layer 1 and up!

Define audit on the network. I'm not sure I'm clear on this.

>Make an appt with your boss later..and ask What can I do to improve my work? I think I do ok at X, what do you think? What about Y? Y isnt so good, can you steer me to a person/place I can learn Y at better?

I've done that once before. He usually doesn't have anything to suggest. He seems to be content having me be as I am. Probably because he knows that if he asks more he will have to pay more.

>If you do want to do these: it may take you another 6 mos but you may get another raise. And you'd show growth, ambition, learning, and attitude...which will go towards the job you have lined up in a year.

I'm just not convinced that something like that would work. The other person I work with is a standard issue workaholic. She's completely loyal to the company and works her *** off everyday often above and beyond the call of duty. She hasn't gotten a raise since she came here other than what little the law mandates.

Collapse -

Unwilling?

by TonytheTiger In reply to Because

>>Change dress. Dress for the pay you want, not what you get. Period.

>This is on of the few things I am unwilling to do.

Rebel on your own time, not the company's.

and remember: If you always do what you always did, you'll always get what you always got.

Collapse -

Rebel?

by Db0 In reply to Unwilling?

It's not about rebelion. It's unwillingness to conform.
Loose dress code is one of the perks of IT imho.
(Don't imagine I dress like a punk or anything. Just casual)

PS: About rebellion, although a bit out of context, you cannot rebel when the situation suits you. Either you rebel or you don't. Period.

Collapse -

Rebel

by TonytheTiger In reply to Rebel?

1. To refuse allegiance to and oppose by force an established government or ruling authority.
2. To resist or defy an authority or a convention.
3. To feel or express strong unwillingness or repugnance.

And I did wonder... I've seen enough guys come to job interviews with their pantwaste about mid-thigh and their flowered boxers (or worse! (as Nancy Reagan said: "Just say 'NO' to crack!")) showing, then whining that nobody will hire them :)

Collapse -

Lucky

by noyoki In reply to Rebel

> Loose dress code is one of the perks of IT imho.

Lol! Of your company perhaps, that is certinately not true of every company. I don't feel the rules quite so much as my office is a floor below the main company's (IT was sort of an afterthought, lol), but even "dress-down" day in the office is well above "casual". This goes for me as well. The one thing I "get away with" is eating at my desk, because no one ever comes down here and I have too much to do to even take a lunch.

Then again, I've spent enough time on unemployment (not for the dress reason so much as no experience in the field) that even if this were an issue, I'd get over it fast enough. If you are unwilling to dress the part at the very least, then don't bother asking for more, as it might lead them to let you go in favor of someone new. Someone willing to accept the pay (casual or office dressed). Once this happens, you're going to have to make some tough choices. IT isn't ALL about what you know. We may wish it were, but it's not. You have to be presentable as well.

Back to IT Employment Forum
24 total posts (Page 1 of 3)   01 | 02 | 03   Next

Related Discussions

Related Forums