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  • #2171083

    Can’t ping 1 device on my network

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    by jsputer84 ·

    I have a Buffalo WZR-D1800H Ver.1.88 router. Each device that connects to it has a 192.168.11.x Static IP, and are Statically assigned in the Buffalo router. I am able to ping all IP’s, but one from any device connected to the Buffalo. The device I can not ping is a NETGEAR WNR2000v2 with Statically assigned IP as 192.168.11.3 in both the NETGEAR, and Buffalo. Although, I can ping devices connected to the Buffalo from a device connected to the NETGEAR, such as 192.168.11.2 which is my Main computer connected direct to the Buffalo via CAT5. I am stumped. I’ve tried port forwarding, and allowing (from the NETGEAR interface) Remote Access via Port 8080 in IP Range 192.168.11.1 – 192.168.11.9. Also, tried allowing “Everyone” for Remote Access to the NETGEAR. Nothing has helped. Any ideas what I can do?

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    • #2887161

      Clarifications

      by jsputer84 ·

      In reply to Can’t ping 1 device on my network

      Clarifications

    • #2887145

      Respond to ping and why two routers?

      by rob kuhn ·

      In reply to Can’t ping 1 device on my network

      Most of the current Netgear devices have a setting that either allows or disallows a ping response; though I believe that is only for the WAN port.

      How do you have the Netgear connected? In other words do you have the WAN or LAN port connected to your Buffalo? And just out of curiosity, why do you have two routers on this particular network?

      • #2887848

        Reponse To Answer

        by jsputer84 ·

        In reply to Respond to ping and why two routers?

        I have the CAT5 running from Port 2 on the Buffalo to the WAN Port on the Netgear. I am using the Netgear as a network extender to another part of the house. Wireless is disabled on the Netgear as I only need the LAN connections on that end of the network.

      • #2887844

        Reponse To Answer

        by rob kuhn ·

        In reply to Respond to ping and why two routers?

        Forget using the WAN port on the Netgear. Connect just one of the LAN ports to the Buffalo. You are basically using the Netgear as a “dumb” switch and so you won’t be able to ping the Netgear as the static IP only applies to the WAN port.

        The only reason I would use the WAN port on the Netgear in your configuration is if I wanted to setup two seperate LANs (a sort of VLAN).

      • #2887840

        Reponse To Answer

        by jsputer84 ·

        In reply to Respond to ping and why two routers?

        So run LAN to LAN? Would I have to set up routes to make that work? Or is it simple PnP scenario? I know I’d be better of getting a switch, but funds need to go elsewhere for the moment lol. Thank you Rob for all your help thus far!

      • #2887833

        Reponse To Answer

        by rob kuhn ·

        In reply to Respond to ping and why two routers?

        Correct. LAN-to-LAN. Before you do that, disable the DHCP service, you’ve already disabled the wireless, and any other configuration you made have made.

        The static IP you assigned should not cause a problem and you could leave it. That would in a sense make the WAN port a “service port” 🙂

        If you really want to make this easier and less of a headache, pick up a small 5 or 8 port 10/100/1000MB Ethernet switch and just remove the Netgear from the picture all together. 🙂

    • #2887140

      You would have to enable ICMP on WAN interface of Netgear

      by robo_dev ·

      In reply to Can’t ping 1 device on my network

      Either thru a setting, such as Mr. Kuhn noted above, or with a specific firewall rule.

      Enable “Respond to Ping On Internet Port”

      I won’t mention that having a router-behind-a-router is generally a bad idea and slows down the network. I also won’t mention that if you just disable DHCP and hook a LAN port from the Netgear to the Buffalo, you will be able to ping.

      • #2887847

        Reponse To Answer

        by jsputer84 ·

        In reply to You would have to enable ICMP on WAN interface of Netgear

        Speed loss isn’t noticeable really due to running 30/30 Mbits/sec. Internet connection. Believe it or not, I only lose about 1Mb once the traffic passes through the Netgear. I have wireless disabled on the Netgear to prevent interference. Although, having the channels on the 2.4 GHz Spectrum spread out by 4 channels won’t interfere. That is as long as they aren’t right on top of each other, which they are not. I did mess with my Firewall rules, but did not help. I will see if I can find out how to enable ICMP.

      • #2887843

        Reponse To Answer

        by rob kuhn ·

        In reply to You would have to enable ICMP on WAN interface of Netgear

        Generally you do not use two routers in a single LAN. You could but there’s not real advantage (at least not in your case). The loss in speed/performance would be due to double-routing. In other words you could find that you are able to connect to devices in one direction but not the other so you will have to setup routes and possibly NATs – this is where your bottleneck will occur and can have an impact on performance; home routers generally do not have the CPU power to process a lot of internal routing traffic. If it’s just a basic home network you could be OK but you could find later that it will be a nightmare to troubleshoot if you run into connectivity issues later.

      • #2887839

        Reponse To Answer

        by jsputer84 ·

        In reply to You would have to enable ICMP on WAN interface of Netgear

        Definitely do not want a future headache. Although, I can see the Buffalo, of course, outperforming the Netgear as far as CPU power goes. But don’t want to risk it on a $200 router 🙂

      • #2887832

        Reponse To Answer

        by rob kuhn ·

        In reply to You would have to enable ICMP on WAN interface of Netgear

        Not saying that you will run into problem but you do have the potential of running into a routing issue. I would remove the Netgear all together and drop in a simple 5 or 8 port 10/100/1000MB Ethernet swtich in place of the Netgear. They’re as cheap as $40 (USD). Then hang onto the Netgear as a backup or if you get bored set it up as a WAP repeater 🙂

    • #2887823

      turn one or the other into a smart switch

      by who am i really ·

      In reply to Can’t ping 1 device on my network

      not familiar with either unit
      but somewhere in the config pages should be a setting that changes the unit into a router/smart switch vs, Gateway

      Cisco / Linksys units call it (Router / Gateway)
      which is weird but,
      Gateway Mode is used if your Cisco / Linksys router is hosting your network’s connection to the Internet.
      Router Mode should be selected if the router exists on a network with other routers.

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