General discussion

Locked

Career Paths

By laura.maynard ·
What is the most important factor in career movement? A Bacholer's degree in Information Systems or a certificate in Microsoft Systems Engineering? I have asked 10 people in the IT field and get 5 for a degree and 5 for MCSE certification. Right now I am attenging college for my degree but would like to get MCSE cert. Let me know. Thank you.

This conversation is currently closed to new comments.

8 total posts (Page 1 of 1)  
| Thread display: Collapse - | Expand +

All Comments

Collapse -

Career Paths

by tmaclennan In reply to Career Paths

A Bachelor's in IS proves that you are capable of college-level intelligence and work, and have a solid grounding in general concepts and theory.

An MCSE proves that you can learn a series of complex principles and procedures using a specific set of tools. It also shows a seriousness about your chosen field and dedication to accomplish a difficult task.

Job experience shows an employer what others have trusted you to do, and perhaps what you have been able to accomplish outside the classroom setting.

Hiring agents will look at all three areas; a pattern of success, drive, creativity, and professionalism will prove to be the greatest asset to career movement.

Collapse -

Career Paths

by laura.maynard In reply to Career Paths

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

Collapse -

Career Paths

by BV2 In reply to Career Paths

It depends on what you want to do - If it's any position that has any substantial contact with the public, then a degree is more important. It shows your employer that you successfully interacted with a myriad of intellects and personalities successfully for an extended period of time. If you're going to be in a closet rebuilding servers, the MCSE says that you are used to longs hours of study and observation and will be successful in that vein. From what I've experienced, employers prefer degrees and experience over certificates and experience because the degree shows a greater level of dedication.

Collapse -

Career Paths

by laura.maynard In reply to Career Paths

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

Collapse -

Career Paths

by Shanghai Sam In reply to Career Paths

I've read the previous 2 answers and am going to put my ideas into the pot. I work as the network manager of an IT firm, and have over the last 6 months have been recruiting for lots of different technical positions.

Degrees are fairly valuable as far as employers are concerned, however it doesn't matter what your degree is in. An IT Degree is worth no more than an Engineering or an English Language one. Degrees show an aptitude to learning and are taken as showing a certain minimum level ofintelligence.

Professional qualifications on the other hard are designed to show employers that you have a minimum level of competence with a product. They do not prove anything about intelligence, they show that you can pass a number of multichoice exams (or in many cases read braindumps and reproduce those answers without ever looking at a product). I work for a Microsoft Certified Tecnical Education Center and know EXACTLY what an MCSE is worth these days - which to be honest is not alot if it is in NT 4, and quite a lot more should it be in Windows 2000. The idea that an MCSE proves that you are competent within an area of expertise is a somewhat idealist attitude, as without any experience of the products you will struggle to get any form of IT based job, other than the usual 1st/2nd line support role that will actually teach you much more about IT than any form of book learning.

Collapse -

Career Paths

by rkelly In reply to Career Paths

I've read the previous 2 answers and am going to put my ideas into the pot. I work as the network manager of an IT firm, and have over the last 6 months have been recruiting for lots of different technical positions.

Degrees are fairly valuable as far as employers are concerned, however it doesn't matter what your degree is in. An IT Degree is worth no more than an Engineering or an English Language one. Degrees show an aptitude to learning and are taken as showing a certain minimum level ofintelligence.

Professional qualifications on the other hard are designed to show employers that you have a minimum level of competence with a product. They do not prove anything about intelligence, they show that you can pass a number of multichoice exams (or in many cases read braindumps and reproduce those answers without ever looking at a product). I work for a Microsoft Certified Tecnical Education Center and know EXACTLY what an MCSE is worth these days - which to be honest is not alot if it is in NT 4, and quite a lot more should it be in Windows 2000. The idea that an MCSE proves that you are competent within an area of expertise is a somewhat idealist attitude, as without any experience of the products you will struggle to get any form of IT based job, other than the usual 1st/2nd line support role that will actually teach you much more about IT than any form of book learning.

Collapse -

Career Paths

by laura.maynard In reply to Career Paths

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

Collapse -

Career Paths

by laura.maynard In reply to Career Paths

This question was auto closed due to inactivity

Back to IT Employment Forum
8 total posts (Page 1 of 1)  

Related Discussions

Related Forums