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CodeWarriorz Thoughts

by codewarrior.wins In reply to CodeWarriorz Thoughts

Tech news, healthcare news, politics, music, and more.

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Larry Flynt finds the dirt on John Bolton

by codewarrior.wins In reply to CodeWarriorz Thoughts

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">Mr. Flynt has obtained information from numerous sources that Mr. Bolton participated in paid visits to Plato's Retreat, the popular swingers club that operated in New York City in the late 1970s and early 1980s.</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://codewarriorz.blogspot.com/2005/05/larry-flynt-finds-dirt-on-john-bolton.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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Dow drops 111 on Wal-Mart profit warning

by codewarrior.wins In reply to CodeWarriorz Thoughts

<a href="http://www.businessweek.com/ap/financialnews/D8A1RTTG0.htm?campaign_id=apn_home_down">Dow drops 111 on Wal-Mart profit warning</a>: "The Associated Press/NEW YORK
<br />By MICHAEL J. MARTINEZ
<br />AP Business Writer
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<br />The Associated Press/NEW YORK
<br />By MICHAEL J. MARTINEZ
<br />AP Business Writer
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<br />Dow drops 111 on Wal-Mart profit warning
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<br /> TODAY'S HEADLINES
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<br />MAY. 12 4:39 P.M. ET Stocks tumbled sharply Thursday as a second-quarter profit warning from Wal-Mart Stores Inc. overshadowed strong economic news and a sharp drop in oil prices. The Dow fell more than 100 points for the second time this week.
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<br />Investors' fears of an economic slowdown were heightened after Wal-Mart missed Wall Street's profit expectations for the quarter and, more importantly, said high gasoline prices have hurt customer spending and will affect the company's second-quarter results.
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<br />That put a damper on a very positive Commerce Department report, which showed a 1.4 percent increase in retail sales, the best gain in six months. Analysts had been expecting a rise of 0.8 percent.
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<br />Advertisement
<br />Combined with oil falling below $49 per barrel, the balance of news could be swinging in the market's favor, but investors' pessimism instead sent stocks falling.
<br />"Wal-Mart is overshadowing it, but the fact remains the economic news is good. It indicates that the mild slowdown in economic activity we've seen is probably going to be short lived," said Peter Cardillo, chief strategist and senior vice president at S.W. Bach & Co. "We'll probably have a belated positive reaction over the next day or two once the effects of Wal-Mart begin to dissipate."
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<br />According to preliminary calculations, the Dow Jones industrial average fell 110.77, or 1.08 percent, to 10,189.48.
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<br />Broader stock indicators also lost considerable ground. The Standard & Poor's 500 index was down 11.75, or 1 percent, at 1,159.36, and the Nasdaq composite index fell 7.67, or 0.39 percent, to 1,963.88.
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<br />The price of oil price dropped sharply for a second straight session. But it remains high enough going into the summer driving season to exacerbate worries of an economic slowdown as consumers spend more on gasoline and less on everything else. A barrel of light crude settled at $48.54, down $1.91, on the New York Mercantile Exchange -- near an 11-week low. The fall in oil prices prompted a selloff in energy stocks, however.
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<br />The bond market edged higher as stocks fell, with the yield on the 10-year Treasury note falling to 4.17 percent from 4.18 percent late Wednesday. The dollar rose to a 2005 high against the euro and made gains against other major currencies. Gold prices fell.
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<br />Investors continued to focus on the Federal Reserve and interest rates, despite the good economic news. Many on Wall Street are concerned that higher rates could choke off economic growth, but also that inflation may take hold if rates are too low.
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<br />"It's clear that the economy is growing, and it's growing in a way you'd hope it would be in this point in the cycle," said Hans Olsen, managing director and chief investment officer at Bingham Legg Advisers in Boston. "The economy is throwing a party and the stock market's not attending."
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<br />While profits at Wal-Mart rose 14 percent from the first quarter last year, the company's warning on its second-quarter earnings unnerved investors who have grown accustomed to strong gains at the nation's largest retailer. Wal-Mart skidded 95 cents to $47.65 after missing analysts' expectations by a penny per share and saying that its 2005 profit forecasts could be difficult to achieve.
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<br />Target Corp. climbed 60 cents to $48.80 after the retailer posted robust sales for the quarter and saw earnings rise 15 percent. The company beat Wall Street's profit forecasts by 2 cents per share.
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<br />Embattled Wall Street firm Morgan Stanley dropped 45 cents to $49.40 after a group of dissident shareholders publicized their plan to spin off the company's investment banking business from the rest of the firm, essentially reversing its 1997 merger with Dean Witter & Co. The dissidents claim their plan was developed with the help of institutional shareholders.
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<br />3M Co. has agreed to purchase filtration products maker Cuno Inc. for $1.35 billion in cash and assumed debt, a deal that would expand 3M's reach in the liquid- and gas-filtration market. 3M lost $1.21 to $75.78, while Cuno surged 29.2 percent, or $16.03, to $70.85.
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<br />Ameritrade Holding Corp. added 4 cents to $13.80 after the company said it is not for sale, rebuffing a takeover offer from E-Trade Financial Corp. E-Trade was down 34 cents at $12.04 on the news.
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<br />Declining issues outnumbered advancers by more than 5 to 2 on the New York Stock Exchange, where volume came to 1.58 billion shares, compared with 1.41 billion on Wednesday.
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<br />The Russell 2000 index of smaller companies was down 8.68, or 1.5 percent, at 586.89.
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<br />Overseas, Japan's Nikkei stock average fell 0.38 percent. In Europe, Britain's FTSE 100 was up 0.37 percent, Germany's DAX index rose 0.54 percent, and France's CAC-40 gained 0.91 percent for the session.
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<br />
<br />
<br />Dow drops 111 on Wal-Mart profit warning
<br />
<br />?
<br />
<br />
<br /> TODAY'S HEADLINES
<br />Culture Wars Hit Corporate America
<br />
<br />How Microsoft Changed Its Mind
<br />
<br />A Digital Warrior for Kodak
<br />
<br />More Knots in Paul Allen's Cable Tangle
<br />
<br />Don't Spoil Disney's Ride
<br />
<br />The High Cost of Easing Off Tobacco
<br />
<br />Meet Your Organ Match Online
<br />
<br />Bring Your CDs Into the iPod Age
<br />
<br />Yahoo's Music Rivals Sing the Blues
<br />
<br />A Surprise Dip in the Trade Deficit
<br />
<br />Playing Defense, Scoring Big
<br />
<br />High Prices, Unhappy Returns
<br />
<br />Nobody Likes a Backseat Striver
<br />
<br />Scaring Up Paranormal Profits
<br />
<br />How Girl on the Go! Got Moving
<br />
<br />The Big Concerns of Small Business
<br />
<br />Europe's Small-Cap Fever
<br />
<br />Madrid's Latin Play Is Paying Off
<br />
<br />Stan Shih on Taiwan and China
<br />
<br />A Tech Boom This Time?
<br />
<br />
<br />? More Headlines
<br />
<br />MAY. 12 4:39 P.M. ET Stocks tumbled sharply Thursday as a second-quarter profit warning from Wal-Mart Stores Inc. overshadowed strong economic news and a sharp drop in oil prices. The Dow fell more than 100 points for the second time this week.
<br />Investors' fears of an economic slowdown were heightened after Wal-Mart missed Wall Street's profit expectations for the quarter and, more importantly, said high gasoline prices have hurt customer spending and will affect the company's second-quarter results.
<br />That put a damper on a very positive Commerce Department report, which showed a 1.4 percent increase in retail sales, the best gain in six months. Analysts had been expecting a rise of 0.8 percent.
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<br />A"<p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://codewarriorz.blogspot.com/2005/05/dow-drops-111-on-wal-mart-profit.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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Newsday.com: GOP Senator Breaks Ranks, Attacks Bolton

by codewarrior.wins In reply to CodeWarriorz Thoughts

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<a href="http://www.newsday.com/news/politics/wire/sns-ap-bolton-tense-moment,0,5912532.story?coll=sns-ap-politics-headlines">Newsday.com: GOP Senator Breaks Ranks, Attacks Bolton</a>
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<br />WASHINGTON -- For a grindingly tense moment, John R. Bolton's U.N. prospects dangled in the balance. Republican George Voinovich of Ohio was laying out a case against Bolton for the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, calling President Bush's nominee to be the next United Nations ambassador "the poster child of what someone in the diplomatic corps should not be."
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<br />After weeks of deliberation by the committee, interviews with 29 past and present U.S. officials and examination of thousands of pages of documents, "I have come to the conclusion that the United States can do better than John Bolton," he said in a low voice.
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<br />Democrats, yearning for Republican support, leaned forward. It seemed the 10-8 Republican majority might disintegrate and be replaced by a 9-9 tie that would stop the nomination. Perhaps Voinovich would touch off an avalanche that would bury the blunt-speaking undersecretary of state.
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<br />But Voinovich suddenly hesitated, put his prepared statement aside and changed the course he had seemed to be on -- enough to keep the nomination alive and possibly ensure its approval by the full Senate.
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<br />"Mr. Chairman," Voinovich said, "I am not so arrogant to think that I should impose my judgment and perspective of the U.S. position in the world community on the rest of my colleagues. We owe it to the president to give Mr. Bolton an up-or-down vote on the floor of the U.S. Senate."
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<br />The committee, he said, should move the nomination along -- but without a recommendation to approve Bolton. "Let the Senate work its will," he said.
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<br />At day's end, Voinovich prevailed. By a 10-8 vote the committee followed his recommendation, and now it will be up to the Senate itself to decide.
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<br />Afterward, Voinovich said he would vote against Bolton on the floor. But three other Republicans who had indicated they were having a tough time making up their minds, Chuck Hagel of Nebraska, Lincoln Chafee of Rhode Island and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, registered their support for confirmation.
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<br />The Republicans control the Senate 55 to 44, with one independent.
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<br />The Ohio senator declined to predict the outcome. But he was certain of one thing: "My feeling was this should not be decided by the committee."
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<br />"I intend to do the best to share my concerns about him with my colleagues in the Senate, hopefully to convince them to not just rubber-stamp this, but rather give this thoughtful consideration."
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<br />Voinovich declined to say whether he had tipped off the White House to his unusual move. But he hinted there was no reason for surprise. "I think they probably knew where I was coming from," he said.
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<br />The White House responded with care. Spokesman Scott McClellan said, "We respect Senator Voinovich's decision, but there are many people who agree with the president that John Bolton is the right person at the right time for this important position."
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<br />The Democrats still hoped this was a break in their direction.
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<br />Sen. Joseph R. Biden of Delaware, who led the drive against Bolton, called on Bush to withdraw the nomination.
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<br />Sen. Barbara Boxer of California said of Bush, "I guess he wants a fight and we are going to have a fight."
<br />===========SNIP=================
<br />Hey, her name ain't BOXER for nothing. Kick *** Babs!</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://codewarriorz.blogspot.com/2005/05/newsdaycom-gop-senator-breaks-ranks.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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Good Riddamce to Bad Rubbish- Dennis Miller leaves CNBC before they boot his ***

by codewarrior.wins In reply to CodeWarriorz Thoughts

<a href="http://www.broadcastingcable.com/article/CA601097.html?display=Breaking+News&referral=SUPP">Broadcasting & Cable: The Business of Television</a><br />===SNIP=======<br />Dennis Miller is leaving his sorry television show on CNBC before they fire him. I say good riddance to bad rubbish. Hey kiddo, your Neo-con rap needs more than a rim shot to make it hip...you ain't cool, you just chilly, and chilly never been cool Skeezicks!<br /><br />Look, no two ways about it, Miller has talent for standup. Even as much as I hate his ***, through his arrogant hubris, he has quick wits, but when you marry those quick wits with a tired, stiff shirted conservative riff, it gets old REAL quick. In his old show on cable, he at least had that schtick where he would stand in front of that big tv and make fun of still photos, putting his (or his writer's) captions. It was hilarious. But, it's just wrong for such a wrongheaded asshole to have quick wits, because he misuses them.<br /><br />It's like giving the improvisionational skills of Robin Williams, or biting satire of George Carlin, to a buffoon like Cheney or King George the Coward. It would be like giving a body like that of Anna Nicole, to a nun...whatta waste!<br /><br />So, speaking of waste, good riddance to bad rubbish.<br /><br />Adieu Miller, we hardly knew you..but didn't want to anyway.<br />~Code<p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://codewarriorz.blogspot.com/2005/05/good-riddamce-to-bad-rubbish-dennis.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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Dark days at Wal-Mart; bright times for Target

by codewarrior.wins In reply to CodeWarriorz Thoughts

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<a href="http://www.suntimes.com/output/business/cst-fin-retail13.html">Dark days at Wal-Mart; bright times for Target</a>
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<br />Dark days at Wal-Mart; bright times for Target
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<br />May 13, 2005
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<br />BY ANNE D'INNOCENZIO Advertisement
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<br />NEW YORK -- Wal-Mart, struggling with higher gasoline prices and slippage in its leadership in the retail industry, reported lower-than-expected first-quarter earnings Thursday, and offered a disappointing profit outlook.
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<br />Discount rival Target, which keeps sharpening its appeal to higher-income consumers, enjoyed first-quarter results that exceeded expectations. It offered an upbeat outlook.
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<br />Shares of Wal-Mart fell 95 cents, or 2 percent, to $47.65. Before Thursday, they had dropped 11 percent in the past year compared with an 8.8 percent gain for Target. Shares of Target rose 60 cents, or 1.2 percent, to $48.80.
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<br />''There's no question that higher gasoline prices have hurt Wal-Mart's consumer, but Wal-Mart is struggling with store-level execution,'' said Bob Buchanan, a retail analyst with St. Louis-based A.G. Edwards. ''They're slow at checkout, and they're missing a lot of fashion on the selling floor. Target continues to do a better job in merchandising and executions. And its checkout is lightening fast.''
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<br />Although Bentonville, Ark.-based Wal-Mart has made some moves to expand into trendier and better quality merchandise, analysts say it has a way to go.
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<br />Moreover, Buchanan believes that controversial issues, from gender discrimination to wage-and-hour violations, that continue to dog the retailer have started to take a toll on its performance.
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<br />Wal-Mart reported a 14 percent increase in first-quarter earnings, missing Wall Street forecasts by 2 cents a share. It also warned that second-quarter results will be lower than analysts expected, and said its annual profit goal could be difficult to achieve.
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<br />Target, which has expanded its merchandise with designer names like Isaac Mizrahi, enjoyed a 15 percent profit increase that was slightly ahead of Wall Street projections. Chairman and CEO Bob Ulrich said he remains confident the company will ''continue to enjoy profitable market share growth throughout 2005 and beyond.''
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<br />The news came as the Commerce Department reported retail sales for April jumped 1.4 percent in April, the strongest performance in six months. It was far better than the 0.8 percent gain many analysts expected.
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<br />Wal-Mart said quarterly net income grew to $2.5 billion, or 58 cents per share, in the three months ended April 30 from $2.2 billion, or 50 cents per share, a year earlier. The company said first-quarter earnings were boosted by $145 million, or 3 cents per share, from tax and legal resolutions. Excluding the items, earnings per share totaled 55 cents per share, a penny below Wall Street expectations.
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<br />Sales rose 10 percent to $70.9 billion from $64.76 billion a year ago, while total revenue including sales and other income grew to $71.7 billion from $65.4 billion a year ago.
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<br />A consensus of analysts surveyed by Thomson Financial expected the company to earn 56 cents per share on sales of $72 billion.
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<br />Wal-Mart expects sales below expectations for the second quarter, and projected per-share earnings for the period of between 63 cents and 67 cents.
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<br />Analysts polled by Thomson Financial had expected 70 cents in the second quarter.
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<br />Meanwhile, Target earned $494 million, or 55 cents per share, in the three months ended April 30, up from $432 million, or 47 cents per share, a year earlier. Analysts surveyed by Thomson Financial expected 53 cents per share on sales of $11.53 billion.</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://codewarriorz.blogspot.com/2005/05/dark-days-at-wal-mart-bright-times-for.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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People's Daily Online -- Students hold anti-US protests in Kabul

by codewarrior.wins In reply to CodeWarriorz Thoughts

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<a href="http://english.people.com.cn/200505/13/eng20050513_184858.html">People's Daily Online -- Students hold anti-US protests in Kabul</a>Several hundreds of students from Kabul University hold anti-US protests on the street in Kabul, capital of Afghanistan, May 12, 2005. The university students, angered by a report in Newsweek magazine that US interrogators at the Guantanamo Bay detention center in Cuba had desecrated the Quran to intimidate prisoners, started demonstrations in eastern city of Jalalabad on Tuesday and the protests spread in some other cities on Wednesday.
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</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://codewarriorz.blogspot.com/2005/05/peoples-daily-online-students-hold.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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Dr. Hager's Family Values

by codewarrior.wins In reply to CodeWarriorz Thoughts

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<a href="http://www.thenation.com/docprint.mhtml?i=20050530&s=mcgarvey">Dr. Hager's Family Values</a>Dr. Hager's Family Values
<br />by AYELISH MCGARVEY
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<br />[from the May 30, 2005 issue]
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<br />Late last October Dr. W. David Hager, a prominent obstetrician-gynecologist and Bush Administration appointee to the Advisory Committee for Reproductive Health Drugs in the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), took to the pulpit as the featured speaker at a morning service. He stood in the campus chapel at Asbury College, a small evangelical Christian school nestled among picturesque horse farms in the small town of Wilmore in Kentucky's bluegrass region. Hager is an Asburian nabob; his elderly father is a past president of the college, and Hager himself currently sits on his alma mater's board of trustees. Even the school's administrative building, Hager Hall, bears the family name.
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<br />That day, a mostly friendly audience of 1,500 students and faculty packed into the seats in front of him. With the autumn sunlight streaming through the stained-glass windows, Hager opened his Bible to the Old Testament Book of Ezekiel and looked out into the audience. "I want to share with you some information about how...God has called me to stand in the gap," he declared. "Not only for others, but regarding ethical and moral issues in our country."
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<br />For Hager, those moral and ethical issues all appear to revolve around sex: In both his medical practice and his advisory role at the FDA, his ardent evangelical piety anchors his staunch opposition to emergency contraception, abortion and premarital sex. Through his six books--which include such titles as Stress and the Woman's Body and As Jesus Cared for Women, self-help tomes that interweave syrupy Christian spirituality with paternalistic advice on women's health and relationships--he has established himself as a leading conservative Christian voice on women's health and sexuality.
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<br />And because of his warm relationship with the Bush Administration, Hager has had the opportunity to see his ideas influence federal policy. In December 2003 the FDA advisory committee of which he is a member was asked to consider whether emergency contraception, known as Plan B, should be made available over the counter. Over Hager's dissent, the committee voted overwhelmingly to approve the change. But the FDA rejected its recommendation, a highly unusual and controversial decision in which Hager, The Nation has learned, played a key role. Hager's reappointment to the committee, which does not require Congressional approval, is expected this June, but Bush's nomination of Dr. Lester Crawford as FDA director has been bogged down in controversy over the issue of emergency contraception. Crawford was acting director throughout the Plan B debacle, and Senate Democrats, led by Hillary Clinton and Patty Murray, are holding up his nomination until the agency revisits its decision about going over the counter with the pill.
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<br />When Hager's nomination to the FDA was announced in the fall of 2002, his conservative Christian beliefs drew sharp criticism from Democrats and prochoice groups. David Limbaugh, the lesser light in the Limbaugh family and author of Persecution: How Liberals Are Waging Political War Against Christianity, said the left had subjected Hager to an "anti-Christian litmus test." Hager's valor in the face of this "religious profiling" earned him the praise and lasting support of evangelical Christians, including such luminaries as Charles Colson, Dr. James Dobson and Franklin Graham, son of the Rev. Billy Graham.
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<br />Back at Asbury, Hager cast himself as a victim of religious persecution in his sermon. "You see...there is a war going on in this country," he said gravely. "And I'm not speaking about the war in Iraq. It's a war being waged against Christians, particularly evangelical Christians. It wasn't my scientific record that came under scrutiny [at the FDA]. It was my faith.... By making myself available, God has used me to stand in the breach.... Just as he has used me, he can use you."
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<br />Up on the dais, several men seated behind Hager nodded solemnly in agreement. But out in the audience, Linda Carruth Davis--co-author with Hager of Stress and the Woman's Body, and, more saliently, his former wife of thirty-two years--was enraged. "It was the most disgusting thing I've ever heard," she recalled months later, through clenched teeth.
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<br />According to Davis, Hager's public moralizing on sexual matters clashed with his deplorable treatment of her during their marriage. Davis alleges that between 1995 and their divorce in 2002, Hager repeatedly sodomized her without her consent. Several sources on and off the record confirmed that she had told them it was the sexual and emotional abuse within their marriage that eventually forced her out. "I probably wouldn't have objected so much, or felt it was so abusive if he had just wanted normal [vaginal] sex all the time," she explained to me. "But it was the painful, invasive, totally nonconsensual nature of the [****] sex that was so horrible."
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<br />Not once during the uproar over Hager's FDA appointment did any reporter solicit the opinion of the woman now known as Linda Davis--she remarried in November 2002 to James Davis, a Methodist minister, and relocated to southern Georgia--on her husband's record, even though she contributed to much of his self-help work in the Christian arena (she remains a religious and political conservative). She intermittently thought of telling her story but refrained, she says, out of respect for her adult children. It was Hager's sermon at Asbury last October that finally changed her mind. Davis was there to hear her middle son give a vocal performance; she was prepared to hear her ex-husband inveigh against secular liberals, but she was shocked to hear him speak about their divorce when he took to the pulpit.
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<br />"In early 2002," Hager told the churchgoers that day, "my world fell apart.... After thirty-two years of marriage, I was suddenly alone in a new home that we had built as our dream home. Time spent 'doing God's will' had kept me from spending the time I needed to nourish my marriage." Hager noted with pride that in his darkest hour, Focus on the Family estimated that 50 million people worldwide were praying for him.
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<br />Linda Davis quietly fumed in her chair. "He had the gall to stand under the banner of holiness of the Lord and lie, by the sin of omission," she told me. "It's what he didn't say--it's the impression he left."
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<br />David Hager is not the fringe character and fundamentalist faith healer that some of his critics have made him out to be. In fact, he is a well-credentialed doctor. In Kentucky Hager has long been recognized as a leading Ob-Gyn at Lexington's Central Baptist Hospital and a faculty member at the University of Kentucky's medical school. And in the 1990s several magazines, including Modern Healthcare and Good Housekeeping, counted him among the best doctors for women in the nation.
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<br />Yet while Hager doesn't advocate the substitution of conservative Christianity for medicine, his religious ideology underlies an all-encompassing paternalism in his approach to his women patients. "Even though I was trained as a medical specialist," Hager explained in the preface to As Jesus Cared for Women, "it wasn't until I began to see how Jesus treated women that I understood how I, as a doctor, should treat them." To underscore this revelation, Hager recounted case after case in which he acted as confidant, spiritual adviser and even father figure to his grateful patients. As laid out in his writings, Hager's worldview is not informed by a sense of inherent equality between men and women. Instead, men are expected to act as benevolent authority figures for the women in their lives. (In one of his books, he refers to a man who raped his wife as "selfish" and "sinful.") But to model gender relations on the one Jesus had with his followers is to leave women dangerously exposed in the event that the men in their lives don't meet the high standard set by God Himself--trapped in a permanent state of dependence hoping to be treated well.
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<br />In tandem with his medical career, Hager has been an aggressive advocate for the political agenda of the Christian right. A member of Focus on the Family's Physician Resource Council and the Christian Medical and Dental Society, Hager assisted the Concerned Women for America in submitting a "Citizen's Petition" to the FDA in August 2002 to halt distribution and marketing of the abortion pill, RU-486. It was this record of conservative activism that ignited a firestorm when the Bush Administration first floated his name for chairman of the FDA's advisory committee in the fall of 2002. In the end, the FDA found a way to dodge the controversy: It issued a stealth announcement of Hager's appointment to the panel (to be one of eleven members, not chairman) on Christmas Eve. Liberals were furious that they weren't able to block his appointment. For many months afterward, an outraged chain letter alerting women to the appointment of a man with religious views "far outside the mainstream" snaked its way around the Internet, lending the whole episode the air of urban legend.
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<br />Back in Lexington, where the couple continued to live, Linda Hager, as she was still known at the time, was sinking into a deep depression, she says. Though her marriage had been dead for nearly a decade, she could not see her way clear to divorce; she had no money of her own and few marketable skills. But life with David Hager had grown unbearable. As his public profile increased, so did the tension in their home, which she says periodically triggered episodes of abuse. "I would be asleep," she recalls, "and since [the sodomy] was painful and threatening, I woke up. Sometimes I acquiesced once he had started, just to make it go faster, and sometimes I tried to push him off.... I would [confront] David later, and he would say, 'You asked me to do that,' and I would say, 'No, I never asked for it.'"
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<br />I first heard of Davis's experience in 2004 through a friend of hers. After a few telephone conversations, she agreed to have me fly down to see her in her modest parsonage in Georgia, to tell me her story on the record. With her mod reading glasses, stylish bob and clever outfits, Davis, 55, is a handsome woman with a sharp wit. She spoke with me over two days in January.
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<br />Linda Davis (n?e Carruth) first met David Hager on the campus of Asbury College in 1967. "On the very first date he sat me down and told me he was going to marry me," Davis remembers. "I was so overwhelmed by this aggressive approach of 'I see you and I want you' that I was completely seduced by it."
<br />
<br />Davis, a former beauty queen, was a disengaged student eager to get married and start a family. A Hager-Carruth marriage promised prestige and wealth for the couple; her father was a famous Methodist evangelist, and his father was then president of Asbury. "On the surface, it just looked so good," she remembers. The couple married in 1970, while Hager completed medical school at the University of Kentucky.
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<br />"I don't think I was married even a full year before I realized that I had made a horrible mistake," Davis says. By her account, Hager was demanding and controlling, and the couple shared little emotional intimacy. "But," she says, "the people around me said, 'Well, you've made your bed, and now you have to lie in it.'" So Davis commenced with family making and bore three sons: Philip, in 1973; Neal, in 1977; and Jonathan, in 1979.
<br />
<br />Sometime between the births of Neal and Jonathan, Hager embarked on an affair with a Bible-study classmate who was a friend of Davis's. A close friend of Davis's remembers her calling long distance when she found out: "She was angry and distraught, like any woman with two children would be. But she was committed to working it out."
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<br />Sex was always a source of conflict in the marriage. Though it wasn't emotionally satisfying for her, Davis says she soon learned that sex could "buy" peace with Hager after a long day of arguing, or insure his forgiveness after she spent too much money. "Sex was coinage; it was a commodity," she said. Sometimes Hager would blithely shift from vaginal to **** sex. Davis protested. "He would say, 'Oh, I didn't mean to have **** sex with you; I can't feel the difference,'" Davis recalls incredulously. "And I would say, 'Well then, you're in the wrong business.'"
<br />
<br />By the 1980s, according to Davis, Hager was pressuring her to let him videotape and photograph them having sex. She consented, and eventually she even let Hager pay her for sex that she wouldn't have otherwise engaged in--for example, $2,000 for oral sex, "though that didn't happen very often because I hated doing it so much. So though it was more painful, I would let him sodomize me, and he would leave a check on the dresser," Davis admitted to me with some embarrassment. This exchange took place almost weekly for several years.
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<br />Money was an explosive issue in their household. Hager kept an iron grip on the family purse strings. Initially the couple's single checking account was in Hager's name only, which meant that Davis had to appeal to her husband for cash, she says. Eventually he relented and opened a dual account. Davis recalls that Hager would return home every evening and make a beeline for his office to balance the checkbook, often angrily summoning her to account for the money she'd spent that day. Brenda Bartella Peterson, Davis's friend of twenty-five years and her neighbor at the time, witnessed Hager berate his wife in their kitchen after one such episode. For her part, Davis set out to subvert Hager's financial dominance with profligate spending on credit cards opened in her own name. "I was not willing to face reality about money," she admits. "I thought, 'Well, money can't buy happiness, but it buys the kind of misery you can learn to live with.'"
<br />
<br />These financial atmospherics undoubtedly figured into Linda's willingness to accept payment for sex. But eventually her conscience caught up with her. "Finally...I said, 'You know, David, this is like being a prostitute. I just can't do this anymore; I don't think it's healthy for our relationship,'" she recalls.
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<br />By 1995, according to Davis's account, Hager's treatment of his wife had moved beyond morally reprehensible to potentially felonious. It was a uniquely stressful year for Davis. Her mother, dying of cancer, had moved in with the family and was in need of constant care. At the same time, Davis was suffering from a seemingly inexplicable exhaustion during the day. She began exhibiting a series of strange behaviors, like falling asleep in such curious places as the mall and her closet. Occasionally she would--as she describes it--"zone out" in midsentence in a conversation, and her legs would buckle. Eventually, Davis was diagnosed as having narcolepsy, a neurological disorder that affects the brain's ability to regulate normal sleep-wake cycles.
<br />
<br />For Davis, the diagnosis spelled relief, and a physician placed her on several medications to attain "sleep hygiene," or a consistent sleep pattern. But Davis says it was after the diagnosis that the period of the most severe abuse began. For the next seven years Hager sodomized Davis without her consent while she slept roughly once a month until their divorce in 2002, she claims. "My sense is that he saw [my narcolepsy] as an opportunity," Davis surmises. Sometimes she fought Hager off and he would quit for a while, only to circle back later that same night; at other times, "the most expedient thing was to try and somehow get it [over with]. In order to keep any peace, I had to maintain the illusion of being available to him." At still other moments, she says, she attempted to avoid Hager's predatory advances in various ways--for example, by sleeping in other rooms in the house, or by struggling to stay awake until Hager was in a deep sleep himself. But, she says, nothing worked. One of Davis's lifelong confidantes remembers when Davis first told her about the abuse. "[Linda] was very angry and shaken," she recalled.
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<br />As Hager began fielding calls from the White House personnel office in 2001, the stress in the household--and, with it, the abuse--hit an all-time high, according to Davis. She says she confronted her husband on numerous occasions: " 'Every time you do this, I hate your guts. And it blows a bridge out between us that takes weeks, if not months, to heal.'" She says that Hager would, in rare instances, admit what he had done and apologize, but typically would deny it altogether.
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<br />For a while, fears of poverty, isolation and damnation were enough to keep Davis from seeking a divorce. She says that she had never cheated on Hager, but after reuniting with a high school sweetheart (not her current husband) in the chaotic aftermath of September 11, she had a brief affair. En route to their first, and only, rendezvous, she prayed aloud. "I said to the Lord, 'All right. I do not want to die without having sex with someone I love,'" she remembers. "'I want to know what that's like, Lord. I know that it's a sin, and I know this is adultery. But I have to know what it's like.'"
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<br />Davis was sure that God would strike her dead on her way home that weekend. But when nothing happened, she took it as a good sign. Back in Lexington, she walked through her front door and made a decision right there on the spot. "I said, 'David, I want a divorce.'"
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<br />Marital rape is a foreign concept to many women with stories like this one. Indeed, Linda Davis had never heard the term until midway through her divorce. In Kentucky a person is guilty of rape in the first degree when he engages in sexual intercourse with another person by "forcible compulsion"; or when the victim is incapable of consent because she is physically helpless. The same standards apply to the crime of sodomy in the first degree (equivalent to rape, and distinct from consensual sodomy). Both are felonies.
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<br />In sexual assault cases, the outcome hinges on the issue of consent. A high-level domestic violence prosecutor in Kentucky confirmed that a scenario such as this one, in which Davis was in a deep sleep from the narcolepsy, could meet the "physically helpless" standard required for a first-degree offense. A prosecutor could also argue that Hager engaged in sodomy with Davis by means of forcible compulsion, even though the alleged encounters did not involve violence. According to the Kentucky Supreme Court's decision in 1992 in Yarnell v. Commonwealth, a climate of abuse involving "constant emotional, verbal, and physical duress" is tantamount to forcible compulsion. In that case, the victims submitted to the sex acts to avoid a loss of financial security, as well as to maintain peace in the household.
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<br />Historically, the legal system has long been indifferent to the crime of marital sexual assault; as recently as twelve years ago in some states, it was legal for a man to force his wife physically into sex, or commence having sex without her consent--actions that could land a stranger in jail. Until 2000 the Kentucky Penal Code still contained archaic procedural obstacles for prosecuting marital rape, including a requirement that it be reported within one year of the offense. (No other felony--including "stranger rape"--contains a statute of limitations.) Even today, marital sexual assault is a notoriously difficult crime to prosecute. Women like Davis often have strong financial incentives to stay with their spouses; those who speak out frequently face an uphill battle to convince people that their husbands, who may be well liked and respected, are capable of something this ugly at home. Also, because marriages play out over many years, some sex is consensual, while other sex is not--a fact that may complicate matters for a jury in a criminal proceeding.
<br />
<br />Linda Davis chose not to bring allegations of marital rape into her divorce proceedings; her foremost desires at the time were a fair settlement and minimal disruption for her sons. Nonetheless, she informed her lawyer of the abuse. Natalie Wilson, a divorce attorney in Lexington, asked Linda to draw up a working chronology of her marriage to Hager. "[It] included references to what I would call the sexual abuse," Wilson explained. "I had no reason not to believe her.... It was an explanation for some of the things that went on in the marriage, and it explained her reluctance to share that information with her sons--which had resulted in her sons' being very angry about the fact that she was insisting on the divorce."
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<br />As it turned out, when the dust settled after their divorce, nearly everyone in the Hagers' Christian and medical circles in Lexington had sided with Hager, who told people that his wife was mentally unstable and had moved in with another man (she moved in with friends).
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<br />Davis had only told a handful of people about the abuse throughout her marriage, but several of her longtime confidantes confirmed for this article that she had told them of the abuse at the time it was occurring. Wilson, the attorney, spoke to me on the record, as did Brenda Bartella Peterson, Davis's close friend of twenty-five years. Several others close to Davis spoke to me off the record. Two refused to speak to me and denounced Davis for going public, but they did not contest her claims. Many attempts to interview nearly a dozen of Hager's friends and supporters in Lexington and around the country were unsuccessful.
<br />
<br />As for David Hager, after repeated attempts to interview him for this story, we finally spoke for nearly half an hour in early April. That conversation was off the record. "My official comment is that I decline to comment," he said.
<br />
<br />As disturbing as they are on their own, Linda Davis's allegations take on even more gravity in light of Hager's public role as a custodian of women's health. Some may argue that this is just a personal matter between a man and his former wife--a simple case of "he said, she said" with no public implications. That might be so--if there were no allegations of criminal conduct, if the alleged conduct did not bear any relevance to the public responsibilities of the person in question, and if the allegations themselves were not credible and independently corroborated. But given that this case fails all of those tests, the public has a right to call on Dr. David Hager to answer Linda Davis's charges before he is entrusted with another term. After all, few women would knowingly choose a sexual abuser as their gynecologist, and fewer still would likely be comfortable with the idea of letting one serve as a federal adviser on women's health issues.
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<br />(Lest inappropriate analogies be drawn between the Hager accusations and the politics of personal destruction that nearly brought down the presidency of Bill Clinton, it ought to be remembered that President Clinton's sexual relationship with Monica Lewinsky was never alleged to be criminal and did not affect his ability to fulfill his obligations to the nation. This, of course, did not stop the religious right from calling for his head. "The topic of private vs. public behavior has emerged as perhaps the central moral issue raised by Bill Clinton's 'improper relationship,'" wrote evangelist and Hager ally Franklin Graham at the time. "But the God of the Bible says that what one does in private does matter. There needs to be no clash between personal conduct and public appearance.")
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<br />Hager's FDA assignment is an object lesson in the potential influence of a single appointment to a federal advisory committee that in turn affects thousands, even millions, of lives. Witness the behind-the-scenes machinations that set the stage for the FDA's ruling against Plan B, a decision that the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists called a "dark stain on the reputation of an evidence-based agency like the FDA."
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<br />On December 16, 2003, twenty-seven of the FDA's advisers on women's health and nonprescription drugs gathered in Gaithersburg, Maryland, to evaluate the safety and efficacy of emergency contraception for over-the-counter use. (The Plan B pill, which drastically reduces the risk of pregnancy when used within seventy-two hours after intercourse, has long been available by prescription only; its advocates say its greater availability could significantly reduce the nation's abortion rate.) After a long day of highly technical deliberation, the advisers voted 23 to 4 to drop the prescription-only status of emergency contraception. "I've been on this committee...for almost four years, and I would take this to be the safest product that we have seen brought before us," announced Dr. Julie Johnson, a professor at the University of Florida's Colleges of Pharmacy and Medicine.
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<br />But on May 6, 2004, the FDA rejected the advice of its own experts and refused to approve the sale of Plan B over the counter. In his letter to Barr Laboratories, Steven Galson, acting director of the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, claimed that Barr had not provided adequate data showing just how young adolescent women would actually use the drug.
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<br />That issue was never voted on by the committee. It was, however, broached by Hager at the meeting; he mentioned his concern for these "younger adolescents" several times.
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<br />In his private practice back in Kentucky, Hager doesn't prescribe emergency contraception, because he believes it is an abortifacient, and, not surprisingly, his was one of the four votes against widening its availability. But rather than voice his ethical opposition to the product, Hager emphasized his concern about adolescents, which other committee members have since called a "political fig leaf." According to Dr. James Trussell, who voted in favor of Plan B, the FDA had at hand six studies examining whether teens as young as 15 would increase their "risky" behavior if they knew they had a backup emergency contraceptive--and none of the studies showed any evidence for that contention.
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<br />In his sermon at Asbury College last fall, Hager proudly recounted his role in the Plan B decision. "After two days of hearings," he said, "the committees voted to approve this over-the-counter sale by 23 to 4. I was asked to write a minority opinion that was sent to the commissioner of the FDA.... Now the opinion I wrote was not from an evangelical Christian perspective.... But I argued it from a scientific perspective, and God took that information, and He used it through this minority report to influence the decision." [Emphasis added.]
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<br />None of the four panel members I spoke with for this article were aware of Hager's "minority opinion." An FDA spokeswoman told me that "the FDA did not ask for a minority opinion from this advisory committee," though she was unable to say whether any individual within the agency had requested such a document from Hager. This past January the FDA missed a deadline to respond to a new application from Barr Laboratories, and any forward motion on making Plan B more widely available has completely stalled.
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<br />Meanwhile, David Hager's stock has been rising among conservatives. Though his term on the FDA panel is set to expire on June 30, observers on both sides of the political divide anticipate his reappointment. In March I spoke with Janice Shaw Crouse, executive director and senior fellow at the Beverly LaHaye Institute, the research arm of Concerned Women for America. She is one of Hager's staunchest advocates in Washington (some credit her with engineering his FDA appointment); Crouse sits alongside Hager on Asbury College's board of trustees. In May, when informed of the allegations against him, she declined to revise her earlier statement. "I would not be at all surprised to see Dr. Hager elevated to a higher position or to another very influential position when it comes to women's care," she told me. "Because he has shown that he does care about women regardless of...the [religious] issues that people want to try to raise.... When people try to discredit him, he continues on. He hasn't caved in, and he hasn't waffled. He has been a gentleman. He is a person of character and integrity, and I think people admire that."
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</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://codewarriorz.blogspot.com/2005/05/dr-hagers-family-values.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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QUOTES FROM THE BOOK 1984

by codewarrior.wins In reply to CodeWarriorz Thoughts

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">From http://www.bookrags.com/notes/1984/QUO.htm<br />Eric Arthur Blair used the pen name of GEORGE ORWELL.<br />He penned the classic, 1984, a dystopic tale of a future society in which there was constant surveillance and micromanagement of the lives of each man and woman.<br />Here are some assorted quotes from that great work.<br />" Quote 1: "BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING YOU" Part 1, Chapter 1, pg. 3<br />Quote 2: "WAR IS PEACE<br />FREEDOM IS SLAVERY<br />IGNORANCE IS STRENGTH." Part 1, Chapter 1, pg. 6<br />Quote 3: "A hideous ecstasy of fear and vindictiveness, a desire to kill, to torture, to smash faces in with a sledgehammer, seemed to flow through the whole group of people like an electric current, turning one even against one's will into a grimacing, screaming lunatic." Part 1, Chapter 1, pg. 16<br />Quote 4: "one of those completely unquestioning, devoted drudges on whom, more even than on the Thought Police, the stability of the Party depended." Part 1, Chapter 2, pg. 23<br />Quote 5: "We shall meet in the place where there is no darkness." Part 1, Chapter 2, pg. 27<br />Quote 6: "The past was dead, the future was unimaginable." Part 1, Chapter 2, pg. 28<br />Quote 7: "With its grace and carelessness it seemed to annihilate a whole culture, a whole system of thought, as though Big Brother and the Party and the Thought Police could all be swept into nothingness by a single splendid movement of the arm." Part 1, Chapter 3, pg. 33<br />Quote 8: "'Who controls the past', ran the Party slogan, 'controls the future: who controls the present controls the past.'" Part 1, Chapter 3, pg. 37<br />Quote 9: "Comrade Ogilvy, who had never existed in the present, now existed in the past, and when once the act of forgery was forgotten, he would exist just as authentically, and upon the same evidence, as Charlemagne or Julius Caesar." Part 1, Chapter 4, pg. 50<br />Quote 10: "Your worst enemy, he reflected, was your own nervous system. At any moment the tension inside you was liable to translate itself into some visible symptom." Part 1, Chapter 6, pg. 64<br />Quote 11: "She had not a thought in her head that was not a slogan, and there was no imbecility, absolutely none, that she was not capable of swallowing if the Party handed it out to her." Part 1, Chapter 6, pg. 67<br />Quote 12: "Sexual intercourse was to be looked on as a slightly disgusting minor operation, like having an enema." Part 1, Chapter 6, pg. 69<br />Quote 13: "They were born, they grew up in the gutters, they went to work at twelve, they passed through a brief blossoming period of beauty and sexual desire, they married at twenty, they were middle-aged at thirty, they died, for the most part, at sixty. Heavy physical work, the care of home and children, petty quarrels with neighbors, films, football, beer, and, above all, gambling filled up the horizon of their minds." Part 1, Chapter 7, pg. 71<br />Quote 14: "If there is hope, wrote Winston, it lies in the proles." Part 1, Chapter 7, pg. 72<br />Quote 15: "Until they become conscious they will never rebel, and until after they have rebelled they cannot become conscious." Part 1, Chapter 7, pg. 74<br />Quote 16: "a nation of warriors and fanatics, marching forward in perfect unity, all thinking the same thoughts and shouting the same slogans, perpetually working, fighting, triumphing, persecuting - three hundred million people all with the same face." Part 1, Chapter 7, pg. 77<br />Quote 17: "Freedom is the freedom to say that two plus two make four. If that is granted, all else follows." Part 1, Chapter 7, pg. 84<br />Quote 18: "It seemed to him that he knew exactly what it felt like to sit in a room like this, in an armchair beside an open fire with your feet in the fender and a kettle on the hob: utterly alone, utterly secure, with nobody watching you, no voice pursuing you, no sound except the singing of the kettle and the friendly ticking of the clock." Part 1, Chapter 8, pg. 100<br />Quote 19: "Oranges and lemons, say the bells of St Clement's, You owe me three farthings, say the bells of St Martin's." Part 1, Chapter 8, pg. 103<br />Quote 20: "At the sight of the words I love you the desire to stay alive had welled up in him, and the taking of minor risks suddenly seemed stupid." Part 2, Chapter 1, pg. 110-11<br />Quote 21: "by degrees the flood of music drove all speculations out of his mind. It was as though it were a kind of liquid stuff that poured all over him and got mixed up with the sunlight that filtered through the leaves." Part 2, Chapter 2, pg. 125<br />Quote 22: "Not merely the love of one person, but the animal instinct, the simple undifferentiated desire: that was the force that would tear the Party to pieces." Part 2, Chapter 2, pg. 127<br />Quote 23: "to be bought furtively by proletarian youths who were under the impression that they were buying something illegal." Part 2, Chapter 3, pg. 132<br />Quote 24: "What was more important was that sexual privation induced hysteria, which was desirable because it could be transformed into war fever and leader worship." Part 2, Chapter 3, pg. 134<br />Quote 25: "She did not understand that there was no such thing as happiness, that the only victory lay in the far future, long after you were dead, that from the moment of declaring war on the Party it was better to think of yourself as a corpse. 'We are the dead,' he said." Part 2, Chapter 3, pg. 137<br />Quote 26: "The smell of her hair, the taste of her mouth, the feeling of her skin seemed to have got inside him, or into the air all around him. She had become a physical necessity." Part 2, Chapter 4, pg. 140<br />Quote 27: "The proles, normally apathetic about the war, were being lashed into one of their periodical frenzies of patriotism." Part 2, Chapter 5, pg. 150<br />Quote 28: "So long as they were actually in this room, they both felt, no harm could come to them." Part 2, Chapter 5, pg. 152<br />Quote 29: "Even the one plan that was practicable, suicide, they had no intention of carrying out. To hang on from day to day and from week to week, spinning out a present that had no future, seemed an unconquerable instinct, just as one's lungs will always draw the next breath so long as there is air available." Part 2, Chapter 5, pg. 153<br />Quote 30: "she only questioned the teachings of the Party when they in some way touched upon her own life. Often she was ready to accept the official mythology, simply because the difference between truth and falsehood did not seem important to her." Part 2, Chapter 5, pg. 154<br />Quote 31: "He had the sensation of stepping into the dampness of a grave, and it was not much better because he had always known that the grave was there and waiting for him." Part 2, Chapter 6, pg. 160<br />Quote 32: "He knew that he was starving the other two, but he could not help it; he even felt that he had a right to do it. The clamorous hunger in his belly seemed to justify him." Part 2, Chapter 7, pg. 163<br />Quote 33: "The terrible thing that the Party had done was to persuade you that mere impulses, mere feelings, were of no account, while at the same time robbing you of all power over the material world." Part 2, Chapter 7, pg. 165<br />Quote 34: "It's the one thing they can't do. They can make you say anything - anything - but they can't make you believe it. They can't get inside you." Part 2, Chapter 7, pg. 167<br />Quote 35: "You will work for a while, you will be caught, you will confess, and then you will die... There is no possibility that any perceptible change will happen within our own lifetime. We are the dead." Part 2, Chapter 8, pg. 177<br />Quote 36: "The primary aim of modern warfare Part 1n accordance with the principles of doublethink, this aim is simultaneously recognized and not recognized by the directing brains of the Inner Party is to use up the products of the machine without raising the general standard of living." Part 2, Chapter 9, pg. 189<br />Quote 37: "If the machine were used deliberately for that end, hunger, overwork, dirt, illiteracy, and disease could be eliminated within a few generations." Part 2, Chapter 9, pg. 190<br />Quote 38: "the consciousness of being at war, and therefore in danger, makes the handing-over of all power to a small caste seem the natural, unavoidable condition of survival." Part 2, Chapter 9, pg. 192<br />Quote 39: "a mixture of psychologist and inquisitor, studying with extraordinary minuteness the meaning of facial expressions, gestures and tones of voice, and testing the truth-producing effects of drugs, shock therapy, hypnosis, and physical torture." Part 2, Chapter 9, pg. 194<br />Quote 40: "It was the product of a mind similar to his own, but enormously more powerful, more systematic, less fear-ridden. The best books, he perceived, are those that tell you what you know already." Part 2, Chapter 9, pg. 201<br />Quote 41: "Even the Catholic Church of the Middle Ages was tolerant by modern standards. Part of the reason for this was that in the past no government had the power to keep its citizens under constant surveillance. The invention of print, however, made it easier to manipulate public opinion, and the film and the radio carried the process further. With the development of television, and the technical advance which made it possible to receive and transmit simultaneously on the same instrument, private life came to an end." Part 2, Chapter 9, pg. 206-7<br />Quote 42: "the essential act of the Party is to use conscious deception while retaining the firmness of purpose that goes with complete honesty." Part 2, Chapter 9, pg. 215<br />Quote 43: "everywhere stood the same solid unconquerable figure, made monstrous by work and childbearing, toiling from birth to death and still singing." Part 2, Chapter 10, pg. 222<br />Quote 44: "It was more natural to exist from moment to moment, accepting another ten minutes' life even with the certainty that there was torture at the end of it." Part 3, Chapter 1, pg. 232<br />Quote 45: "There were times when it went on and on until the cruel, wicked, unforgivable thing seemed to him not that the guards continued to beat him but that he could not force himself into losing consciousness." Part 3, Chapter 2, pg. 244<br />Quote 46: "The old feeling, that at bottom it did not matter whether O'Brien was a friend or an enemy, had come back. O'Brien was a person who could be talked to... O'Brien had tortured him to the edge of lunacy, and in a little while, it was certain, he would send him to his death. It made no difference." Part 3, Chapter 2, pg.255-6<br />Quote 47: "There was nothing left in them except sorrow for what they had done, and love of Big Brother. It was touching to see how they loved him. They begged to be shot quickly, so that they could die while their minds were still clean." Part 3, Chapter 2, pg. 259<br />Quote 48: "We control matter because we control the mind. Reality is inside the skull." Part 3, Chapter 3, pg. 268<br />Quote 49: "'Do you remember writing in your diary,' he said, 'that it did not matter whether I was a friend or an enemy, since I was at least a person who understood you and could be talked to? You were right. I enjoy talking to you. Your mind appeals to me. It resembles my own mind except that you happen to be insane.'" Part 3, Chapter 2, pg. 271<br />Quote 50: "It was like swimming against a current that swept you backwards however hard you struggled, and then suddenly deciding to turn round and go with the current instead of opposing it. Nothing had changed except your own attitude; the predestined thing happened in any case." Part 3, Chapter 4, pg. 280<br />Quote 51: "For the first time he perceived that if you want to keep a secret you must also hide it from yourself." Part 3, Chapter 4, pg. 283<br />Quote 52: "Do it to Julia! Do it to Julia! Not me! Julia! I don't care what you do to her. Tear her face off, strip her to the bones. Not me! Julia! Not me!" Part 3, Chapter 5, pg. 289<br />Quote 53: "There were things, your own acts, from which you could not recover. Something was killed in your breast; burnt out, cauterized out." Part 3, Chapter 6, pg. 293<br />Quote 54: "But it was all right, everything was all right, the struggle was finished. He had won the victory over himself. He loved Big Brother." Part 3, Chapter 6, pg. 300<br />Quote 55: "The purpose of Newspeak was not only to provide a medium of expression for the world-view and mental habits proper to the devotees of Ingsoc, but to make all other modes of thought impossible." Appendix, pg. 303"</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://codewarriorz.blogspot.com/2005/05/quotes-from-book-1984.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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South Texas Healthcare Blog - ENewsBlog

by codewarrior.wins In reply to CodeWarriorz Thoughts

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<a href="http://www.enewsblog.com/davidsonhughes/post/2005-05-18_16:46:39/">South Texas Healthcare Blog - ENewsBlog</a>: "What?s a Doctor?s Time Worth? -- Wednesday, May 18, 20052005-05-18 16:46:39
<br />On May 17, a doctor?s blog called ?medrants? (actually known as 'DB's Medical Rants') offers the following:
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<br />?In our economy, productivity is often measured in units of time. Time is then converted to money. We hire architects, lawyers, plumbers and piano teachers, and we pay them by the hour.
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<br />The current medical reimbursement system pays by the job performed, not by the time spent.
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<br />Your appendectomy is charged on a flat rate, like a brake job. The surgeon who performs your appendectomy gets paid the same if he takes one hour or two, as long as he takes out only one appendix.
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<br />Your family doctor receives the same reimbursement for diagnosing a sinus infection in 6 minutes as he does if he takes 30 minutes.
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<br />In our current system, there is no way to buy an hour of your doctor?s time just to talk.
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<br />The doctor can give you that time free, but under most health plans he cannot bill you for it.
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<br />With the current rate of exchange, as dictated by the health insurance companies, an hour spent talking with your physician has no value.
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<br />The more I consider our reimbursement system, the more I understand how perverse and illogical it really is. ?"</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://codewarriorz.blogspot.com/2005/05/south-texas-healthcare-blog-enewsblog.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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