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Computer not reading Hard Drive via a Desktop HDD Dock

By musical1 ·
My home Windows Vista OS computer (HP) decided to not play nicely the other day by not initializing to the start window. I tried running diagnostics, but no fruitful options.

My backup is a few weeks old and I wanted to recover some files from the HD before returning it to the store for repair under warranty.

I purchased a Cables Unlimited USB2.0/eSATA Desktop HDD Dock.
I inserted my WDC WD6400AAKS-65A7B SCSI Hard Drive and it appeared in the Explorer window as my "F:" Drive. BUT, when I click on it, it tells me that it isn't formatted.

I'm guessing that because it belonged to another computer, partitioning, etc, blah, blah, that it isn't "plug/play".

My question is: What can I do so that I can see the file directories?

I confess that I attempted to put jacks on 2 of the 5 sets of pins to make it a slave drive. Problem was that I didn't have jacks and I attempted a home version of foil. I don't know if my theory was flawed or my home jacks just weren't successful.

Help P L E A S E?

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OK I'm confused

by OH Smeg In reply to Computer not reading Hard ...

You say you bought a SATA Cable Set and you are attempting to plug that into a SCSI HDD.

Westeren Digital doesn't list your Model Number so I have no idea of which type of HDD you have but if it's reasonably new like under 5 years old it's very unlikely to be a SCSI Drive unless you have a Apple computer.

If it's a PC it's likely to be a SATA Serial ATA type drive and these Do Not have Jumpers on them. So what have you shorted out?

Anyway no matter what type of drive that this is when they are connected to a External USB Type connection they need to be set to Master not Slave. If it's a SCSI HDD there is no Master or Slave Settings just a Address Number between 1 and 7 or with the high end SCSI Drives between 1 and 14. So I'm not at all sure what you have done here but you may very well have damaged the drive.

As for the Partition Tables provided that you are using a reasonable modern OS it should read the HDD provide that the drive is correctly addressed.

So if it's an IDE or PATA Drive it needs to be set to Master.

If it's a SATA Drive it needs to be set to nothing just plug it in and use the USB Lead not the ESATA Lead.

If it is a SCSI Drive which is very unlikely then it needs to be addressed to something not already in use for instance the SCSI Controller is almost always set to 1 so you can not address a SCSI Drive to 1 and have it work You Can Not have the same SCSI Address used on more than 1 SCSI Device per SCSI Channel.

Not to mention you also need a External Connection that suits your actual HDD type. You can not fit a IDE HDD to a SATA Connector or a SCSI Connector of any type. Just the same you can not fit a SATA Drive to a IDE Connector or a SCSI Drive in any form to either of the Above Drive Connector Types. When I last looked there where 3 Distinct SCSI Drive Interface Types but that may have changed recently with the adoption of some of the newer Technologies with faster Data Transfer speeds. There was the SCSI, the SCSI Wide and SCSI Hot Swappable Interfaces and these are all different and not interchangeable.

As to getting your Data off this drive provided that it's not now destroyed I would suggest sticking it back where it came from and inserting a Live Linux into the Optical Drive and booting off that. Run the Linux Distro from the Optical Drive and then copy your required Data off the HDD onto whatever you want. Naturally it can not be a Optical Disc if you are using that Optical Drive to run Linux from.

You can get a Live Linux as a cover Disc on most Linux Mags or download one form here

http://www.livecdlist.com/

If the drive isn't now in Silicon Heaven that would be the best way to recover any Data off it.

Col

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Waitwaitwait.

by seanferd In reply to OK I'm confused

<i>Optical Dicks</i>?

Get your eyewear at Optical ****'s? Or is this something scary involving fiber cable?

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OH MY

by OH Smeg In reply to Waitwaitwait.

A word not blocked by the TR Filters and apparently loved by the US Spool Chocker that I'm using. :^0

Sorry to say I've edited it now that you've pointer it out to me.

Col

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Step by step...

by SmartAceW0LF In reply to Computer not reading Hard ...

Questions to be answered, other things clarified. My comments will be listed between these ================

QUOTE: My home Windows Vista OS computer (HP) decided to not play nicely the other day by not initializing to the start window. I tried running diagnostics,

=====================
"What" diagnostics? Did you try the ones built in to Vista?
=====================
but no fruitful options.

My backup is a few weeks old and I wanted to recover some files from the HD before returning it to the store for repair under warranty.

=========================
I assume then that your backup is on a different Hard Drive and that the one you wish to recover the files from and that is the Hard Drive described in the following?
=========================

I purchased a Cables Unlimited USB2.0/eSATA Desktop HDD Dock.
I inserted my WDC WD6400AAKS-65A7B SCSI Hard Drive

=======================
This drive is a SATA not SCSI.
=======================

and it appeared in the Explorer window

=======================
What is the operating system of this computer your dock is plugged into? XP? Vista? WIndows 7?
=======================

as my "F:" Drive. BUT, when I click on it, it tells me that it isn't formatted.

=======================
If that is the exact message it returned in any of the above-mentioned Operating Systems, unless the data you wish to retrieve is really special -and you have no concerns about the monetary costs to recover said files- you are probably better off sending it on back to the store because it doesn't sound good at this juncture. If, on the other hand, that is NOT the exact message, or you can't be sure that's what it was, but to the best of your recollection it was something like that, then plug it back in and write the exact message down and relate it back to us.
========================

I'm guessing that because it belonged to another computer, partitioning, etc, blah, blah, that it isn't "plug/play".

========================
You get 1/2 point for a "possible" here. It has nothing to do with another computer, nor plug and play. Could be partitioning and if it is I refer to my previous comment, UNLESS you wish to try your hand at a program called testdisk (google it) and use at your own risk. BUT FINISH READING THIS ENTIRE POST FIRST! Especially the comment immediately following this one as it should be attempted before this in my opinion.
===========================

My question is: What can I do so that I can see the file directories?

===========================
You said earlier that this was from an HP computer. Put the drive back in that computer, boot to get to setup in the BIOS. Almost all late model HP's have a hard drive testing function in the BIOS. Use that to make a reasonable assumption as to the health of that drive. If it tests out bad, then send the whole unit back for warranty. Not the answer you wanted to hear? You "might" be able to recover some of the data off it yet if you wish to try. My suggestion would be to download GetDataBack for NTFS, plug the drive back into the dock on the other computer and GetDataBack will scan it for possibilities and even allow you to see what files it can recover before purchasing it.
=========================

I confess that I attempted to put jacks on 2 of the 5 sets of pins to make it a slave drive. Problem was that I didn't have jacks and I attempted a home version of foil. I don't know if my theory was flawed or my home jacks just weren't successful.

==============================
This is a brave confession and my hat goes off to you for your courage in admitting it. As a matter of fact, it is your candor here which prompts me to write this small novel. That said, in this day and age it is way too easy to google virtually anything regarding computers, their usage and repair to make mistakes like this. Your biggest mistake here was not the use of foil in lieu of jumpers. Rather, it was the notion that you could use jumpers in an arbitrary fashion without risking catastrophic results. Though not likely to prove catastrophic in the case of HD jumpers, there are other areas it definitely will prove that way. SATA drives (as stated in an earlier post) need no jumpers to work. The pins you mention, those of which you unsuccessfully tried to jump with foil, are there for but one purpose. That being to limit the i/o speed of the drive in order to maintain compatability with older equipment.

Good luck to you in this endeavor. Should you have any further questions, submit them and someone will answer them. And do post back with the outcome of your efforts.

Edited to separate my comments from original posters'

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