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Computers and Electricity

By david_barger ·
I need information that gives me some kind of standards for wiring when computers are involved. I also need information on the results of bad wiring.

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Computers and Electricity

by zlitocook In reply to Computers and Electricity

Your asking alot. I will give you some links to help.
http://dmoz.org/Computers/Home_Automation/
http://www.uncg.edu/apl/POLICIES/iip008.htm
http://www.krakau-inc.com/199912.htm

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Computers and Electricity

by david_barger In reply to Computers and Electricity

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Computers and Electricity

by TheChas In reply to Computers and Electricity

The general rules of the N.E.C. cover most requirements.

For a "standard" PC, you should plan on 1200 watts per PC /user on a line. Thats 10 amps! Or, 2 PCs per 20 AMP circuit.
PC power supply 400 watts
monitor 175 watts
printer 100 watts
wall warts for speakers and other devices 40 watts
desk lights, and other "personal" items can easily add an aditional 200 watts.
So, with a 30% "safety and surge" margin, it adds up pretty fast.

The only "special" requirements for PC's is to notshare a line with any electric motors.
The line sags, and surge spikes when motors are turned on and off can be a source of intermittant PC problems.

The most susceptable component of a PC is the standard CRT monitor.
Poor wireing will show up as flicker, waves, and bloom on a CRT monitor.
This not only shortens the CRT life, but lowers productivity by increasing eye strain and fatigue for the user.

Chas

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Computers and Electricity

by david_barger In reply to Computers and Electricity

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by richard_barsby In reply to Computers and Electricity

Hi just a comment Laser printers tend to be a lot higher in wattage and the cuurent mentiond by the chas is for 110V AC supplys

Rich

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Computers and Electricity

by david_barger In reply to Computers and Electricity

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by david_barger In reply to Computers and Electricity

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