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database design for multiuser software

By ypradeep23 ·
Hay tech-republic!

This is pradeep.

I am going start a project, by using VB6 and MsAccess.
This project is for maintain our daily-accounts; dairy; phone book ect.
My project has to save (maintain) data related to more than one people (user).
How I can achieve my goal?
Can I maintain an .MDB (Access database) with fields' user; password; user-id for each user?
Is there any best alternative for my requirement?

Please suggest best approach for my project.

and, what is the process for insert icons in the menu items, in my
project?

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database design for multiuser software

by donq In reply to database design for multi ...

Microsoft's Access 2000 or 2002 is an EXCELLANT choice to define your user interface with! Build a Table named "Users" or "Employees" and place a UNIQUE 8 text character "User ID" field in it, and a second UNIQUE 8 character text field names "Password". (Look-up "password-protection" in on-line Help).

Get a good book on Access and limit any "programming" to ADO (vs DAO) so your work can be automatically upsized to SQL Server on any other mainframe database product in the future if it workswell and the company grows.

Access is VERY powerful, and therefore complex when you get into the advaanced stuff because VB and C++ proramming work seamlessly within the Microsoft family of products. You have youe work cut out just to learn the basics on database normalization (EXTREMELY IMPORTANT) that no database product inforces; ot teaches very well??

Good Luck Don Quigg

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database design for multiuser software

by ypradeep23 In reply to database design for multi ...

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database design for multiuser software

by Bob Sellman In reply to database design for multi ...

The first question is how many actual users? If 20 or less, Access is a very good solution. Up to 50, Access could be fine if they are not always using it. Otherwise you could need SQL server or something similar. Even so, Access would be a good place to start your database and application design.

You don't indicate your level of Access experience. VBA is vital to include access control for each user. Although you can use Access's security, I prefer to write a log in screen to the application and use a table listing users, passwords, ID, user group, etc. In the application define a module with some public variables, including strUserID to capture the ID of the logged in user. On various menus, forms, and queries, use strUserID tocontrol the visible property of various controls to true where you only want certain users (or groups of users) to have access to various functions and/or data.

Forms containing data which only the logged in user should see ("personal data") should run from queries that include the selector that UserID = strUserID so only that person's data is visible. Ex: diary, daily accounts. You can also use strUserID to limit the data that can be changed to only that user's data, even if other users' data is visible. (For example, when scheduling meetings.)

Remember to keep the back end (data tables) in a separate Access database from the front end (application-forms, reports, modules, queries, etc.) for ease of development & maintenance. The users should only see a menu driven application and not see the database window or be able change designs of forms, etc.

Hopefully this will at least help you get started.

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database design for multiuser software

by ypradeep23 In reply to database design for multi ...

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database design for multiuser software

by Lo In reply to database design for multi ...

Humm, ...

Is your db a multi user (usually more than 1 person accessing at the same time but can mean more than 1 person accessing 1 at a time, rare) or tracking multiple people (a given table has multiple entries and associated data in other tables, most likely, that is what a db is for).

My guess is both.

Multi-user is mostly an issue of opening and locking the database and tables to allow more than 1 user access while preventing user A from getting a record, user B from getting thatsame record, changing, updating, then user A updating, thereby overlaying the change by user B.

The other part, is a db design issue. You have this issue for a single user or multiple users. The process is determining what needs to be tracked, how it is related, how it will be input/updated/and referenced for reports. From that, various fields, tables, views, etc. get defined to store and provide access for update and reporting.

The previous questions pretty much gave that solution, it's noramlly a 2-3 year process of 8 hours a day to learn well. There are various books that will give you the terminology and "how to".

Might consider hiring a DB design resource to assist. While they are expensive, they will keep you out of many holes (even deep dark pits) so that you don't spend the next 2-3 years making changes to correct design issues. If you decide to go this route, find someone in your area that was pleased with one they hired and try them. Lots of "wish I hadn't done that" in the industry.

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database design for multiuser software

by ypradeep23 In reply to database design for multi ...

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database design for multiuser software

by ypradeep23 In reply to database design for multi ...

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