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Dead, unmarked network port

By BigKen ·
I've got an office with a network port that went dead. Problem is that the port is not numbered or identified in anyway. Therefore when I look at the patch panel in the server room, the ports are numbered there, but I don't know which port corresponds to the dead one back in the office as more than a dozen ports appear to be inactive. Is there some inexpensive testing equipment I can buy to check this line out?

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Dead, unmarked network port

by mebudman In reply to Dead, unmarked network po ...

Create a shorting plug for the RJ45 plugs (this is assuming the patch panel patch cords plug into a hub), got to each office and plug a known good patch cable into the wall jack, then attach the shorting plug, go back and check the hub to see which port on the hub states there is an error. Mark the wall plate with the patch panel number and create a network map for future reference. Hope this helps.

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Dead, unmarked network port

by BigKen In reply to Dead, unmarked network po ...

Thanks for the input, Budman.

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Dead, unmarked network port

by McKayTech In reply to Dead, unmarked network po ...

The answer above is just a little too brutal for me. It might work, but I just have this thing about creating dead shorts on live circuits...

This sounds like an ideal application for a toner and inductive tracer. You plug the tone generator into the outlet and then scan the cable bundles in the server room until you find the cable that causes the tracer to squeal. Then once you find the correct patch panel port, you can label the jack and then proceed with continuity testing. It seems to me that I paid around $75 for mine, but right now radioshack.com has a similar set on sale for $49.00 (I have no connection with them, I just happened to notice it on the front cover of the latest catalog I received).

Once you identify the cable, there are a variety of ways of testing it, from using an ohmmeter to do a simple continuity check (I usually make up a loopback connector so I can do all the testing from one end), to cable certification instruments that cost $5,000 and up. Most of the time, a simple device with a few LED indicators that shows opens and shorts will identify bad cables and you can get those for $50 to $100.

paul

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Dead, unmarked network port

by BigKen In reply to Dead, unmarked network po ...

Paul, you've saved my life!! A million thanks for help. This is just the information I need. Sincerely.

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Dead, unmarked network port

by BigKen In reply to Dead, unmarked network po ...

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