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DHCP PROTOCOL

By its ·
My question is: If DHCP auto assigns TCP/IP addresses to workstations how does one determine what IP address a work station has been "leased" at any given time and to what benefit is it to have "dynamic" IP addressing? I have a client who is workingon DHCP and yet when i view the TCP/IP properties at any work station there is no IP address. How does one "ping" the nic card?

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DHCP PROTOCOL

by Joseph Moore In reply to DHCP PROTOCOL

DHCP really gets rid of the headaches IP addressing can cause. I have worked in places where we had static IP addresses for every server and workstation, and places were DHCP handled the IP assignment for the workstations. And let me tell you, DHCP is the way to go!
When you are statically assigning IPs to everything, you have to keep track of what IPs are allocated and which are free. When you are worrying about the user workstations, and what IPs they have, then you are just making a bunch of extra work for yourself that is not needed! User workstations (and user laptops) move around, get traded, and have their IP addressing changed all the time! It is a huge nightmare trying to keep track of all that!
So, set up an IP pool that a DHCPserver can dish out to the users! That way, it doesn't matter what IP user BOB has. Who cares what's BOB IP address? BOB doesn't care! Why should the poor admin???
DHCP takes care of this task, so you don't have to worry.

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DHCP PROTOCOL

by Joseph Moore In reply to DHCP PROTOCOL

This way, you can worry about more important things. For example, say your web server is offline! The company is not making money right now!
Oh, the horror!
MAnagement is staring at you, tapping their paten-leather feet, waiting for you to bring the server back online.
And while you are in the midst of working on the RAID array, a mobile user with a laptop puts a Post-It note on your monitor, saying that they can't remember what their static IP is at that moment (being out of the office fora while), and they were just gonna pick one to get on the network!
Suddenly, you get an IP conflict with your production SQL server!
But the laptop user is now on the network, and surfing the Washington Post website!
And management keeps screaming at you to fix everything!

No one needs this nightmare!!!! Believe me, it isn't fun!
Ok, maybe I am relating something that happened to me a few years ago. Maybe that is why I am an advocate of DHCP.
But you will find many people who think DHCPis the bees knees (strange saying, I know) when it comes to handling user IP addressing.
There are more important issues to worry about.

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DHCP PROTOCOL

by Joseph Moore In reply to DHCP PROTOCOL

Now, as to tell who has what IP, it reall depends on the OS of your DHCP server. All of the DHCP servers have reporting to tell you what machine (either by MAC address or machine name) has what IP. So, a little insight on the OS will help out.
And as for your one client that has a dynamically-assigned IP, but you can't tell what it is, that could be various things. Is the client online, on the network, able to go to other machines and do stuff? Can the client get to the Internet? Again, a little more info will help.
But just as a place to start, be sure to view ALL of the IP properties. If it is a WinNT/2K/XP box, do IPCONFIG /ALL to get all the properties.

hope my rant helps

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DHCP PROTOCOL

by its In reply to DHCP PROTOCOL

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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DHCP PROTOCOL

by Ann777 In reply to DHCP PROTOCOL

With Win95, Win98, Win98SE, etc. go to a Command prompt and type WINIPCFG to find out the current ip information.

With WinNT, Win2000, WinXP, etc. go to a CMD prompt and type IPCONFIG to find out the current ip information.

Then from that local computer, you should be able to ping the server. etc.

Benefits: It's all automatic and you assign a scope of ip addresses outside the range for static (shared) devices such as servers, printers, etc. The server keeps track of everything and there's no chance for user mistake, duplication etc.

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DHCP PROTOCOL

by its In reply to DHCP PROTOCOL

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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DHCP PROTOCOL

by its In reply to DHCP PROTOCOL

Thank you for your clear and consise remarks re:DHCP.I now understand and can better troubleshoot the network.
Sincerly;
Brian Pask

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DHCP PROTOCOL

by Mert G?lsoy (mgulsoy@hotmail.com) In reply to DHCP PROTOCOL

ok. on a network the wstations want to take ip address. asks the server that i want an ip address. Server looks at it's pool database and finds a free ip address and obtains this address to that ws. when this is to be done, DHCP registers the machines name to the DDNS server with subnet. so the obtained ip and DNS name saved to the servers database. When you want to ping BOB's nic, you don't need BoB's ip address. You only need BOB's DNS name! if another ws wants to take that same ip, DHCP saysthis is leased to ... or you want to assign it statically after booting the ws, it will say "there is ip conflict on ... ...".

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DHCP PROTOCOL

by Mert G?lsoy (mgulsoy@hotmail.com) In reply to DHCP PROTOCOL

The tracking numerical ip addresses is DHCP and DDNS's job. If there is DHCP without DDNS you cannot know where the ws is. in small networks (we can say up to 100-150 computers) it's easy to track network without DHCP. By this way our black covered notebook will track the ip addresses and network names. (it will be the black covered notebook DHCP = BCNDHCP :) but in the future there will be network address conficts and these will make serious headaches... there is a lease time option on DHCP setting on server. by setting this the ws's always take the same ip addresses. And you can easyly manage the network. By winipcfg (or it's command line equal ipconfig) in windows or ifconfig in linux (also some unix) you can learn dynamically obtained ip address.
if you want to learn ip address of known named ws write down this command to dos box:
"ping -a [DNS name]" you'll get the ip address.

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DHCP PROTOCOL

by its In reply to DHCP PROTOCOL

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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