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  • #2322469

    differnce of bridge on LAN and a WAN?

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    by g.burton ·

    what is the difference of a bridge on a LAN and a bridge on a WAN?

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    • #3405595

      differnce of bridge on LAN and a WAN?

      by shanghai sam ·

      In reply to differnce of bridge on LAN and a WAN?

      A bridge is used to interconnect LANs on the same subnet to make a wider LAN (or WAN) and is NOT used within a LAN. That’s what hubs and switches are for.

      A bridge connects LANs at the Data Link layer of the OSI model and is used to forward and filter data packets to their destination address.

      A major problem with a bridged network is that it can become heavily congested, as all workstations on every LAN receive all sent packets.

      A more sophisticated method of interconnecting LANs is by using routers. Routers function at the Network Layer and are used to connect differen subnets. They are protocol and prevent congestion by permitting only data packets that match a certain profile. So only the LAN that the data is meant for will accept the packets.

    • #3405592

      differnce of bridge on LAN and a WAN?

      by it bloke ·

      In reply to differnce of bridge on LAN and a WAN?

      A bridge is used to interconnect LANs on the same subnet to make a wider LAN (or WAN) and is NOT used within a LAN. That’s what hubs and switches are for.

      A bridge connects LANs at the Data Link layer of the OSI model and is used to forward and filter data packets to their destination address.

      A major problem with a bridged network is that it can become heavily congested, as all workstations on every LAN receive all sent packets.

      A more sophisticated method of interconnecting LANs is by using routers. Routers function at the Network Layer and are used to connect different subnets. They are protocol specific and prevent congestion by permitting only data packets that match a certain profile. So only the LAN that the data is meant for will accept the packets.

    • #3405478

      differnce of bridge on LAN and a WAN?

      by Anonymous ·

      In reply to differnce of bridge on LAN and a WAN?

      A switch IS a bridge, and each switch port is it’s own collision domain, so I don’t quite agree with the first two duplicate answers. 🙂

      There is no difference between bridged LAN/WANs, since they are both on the same subnet, while routers will segment and route IP subnets. The only difference is the protocols carried over the bridges, for instance your WAN may use ATM, which will then be bridged instead of routed. Don’t think there’s a way to bridge Frame Relay..

    • #3405443

      differnce of bridge on LAN and a WAN?

      by cbeyer ·

      In reply to differnce of bridge on LAN and a WAN?

      Fundamentally, there is NO DIFFERENCE between bridging on a LAN or a WAN. In both cases, you are creating a network segment where nodes may reach each other by their physical (or MAC) addresses, as if they were all plugged into the same hub or members of the same VLAN.

      The reason you might bridge segments across a WAN would be to allow non-routable protocols (like SNA)to function across networks connected by a WAN. It is possible to bridge segments together over hust about any WAN toplogy if your connecting hardware supports it.

    • #3416544

      differnce of bridge on LAN and a WAN?

      by rjeffery ·

      In reply to differnce of bridge on LAN and a WAN?

      Just a point. The extension of a LAN by using a bridge creates an ELAN. This topology – as been already pointed out- would operate at layer 2. There is absolutely no doubt at all that bridges can be used to interconnect segments within a LAN (I managed dozens of them). This was very common 15 or so years ago. Switches are no more than multi port bridges with more brains. All modern routers support both bridging and routing, so if both functions were enabled then the WAN would have the characteristics of both a routed WAN (layer 3) and an bridged ELAN (layer 2).

      and you would have to manage both…

      Any help?

      Roger.

    • #3410954

      differnce of bridge on LAN and a WAN?

      by g.burton ·

      In reply to differnce of bridge on LAN and a WAN?

      This question was closed by the author

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