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DNS Name Convention

By ktamayo ·
I am about to upgrade our internet network to Windows 2000. What considerations should I use when choosing an internal namespace? Why would I choose either the same namespace as our website (mycompany.com), a subdomain to this external domain name(subdomain.mycompany.com), or a completely different namespace altogether (mycompany.corp)?

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by d.walker5 In reply to DNS Name Convention

Answering your question would require more space than is allowed. I suggest you get a copy of "Microsoft Windows 2000 Server TCP/IP Core Networking Guide." Pages 433-438 answer your question, including examples.

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by ktamayo In reply to DNS Name Convention

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by AirHockeyNinja In reply to DNS Name Convention

If you choose the same name space as your company's website, the website will be inaccessable to anyone logged into the domain, because internal DNS is going to find mycompany.com locally and never even look to the web. Other than that, It's pretty much up to you, but you should generally stick with something involving the company name, maybe mycompanylan.com or something similar. I hope this helps, if I can be of further assistance, feel free to email me. Good Luck!

Joe

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by ktamayo In reply to DNS Name Convention

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by curlergirl In reply to DNS Name Convention

It only matters if your DNS server is going to be public (i.e., an authoritative server for your domain that responds to requests from non-local hosts for name resolution). In this case, you MUST use your public domain name, i.e, [mydomain].com. If your DNS zone will be strictly local, you can theoretically name it anything you want. Microsoft generally recommends using [mydomain].local or subdomain.[mydomain].com. I tend to use the same domain name as the public name ([mydomain].com), but there is a trick to this - you have to be sure that your DNS server is NOT set up as a root server. If you allow your DNS server to be a root server with this setup (using the same name as your public domain name), you will not be able to browse outside your local domain at all.

Hope this helps!

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by ktamayo In reply to DNS Name Convention

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by Cactus Pete In reply to DNS Name Convention

We just moved 6 months ago, and at the same time migrated to 2000.

Our internal was companyname.com, just like our web address. This worked because DNS knew that www.companyname.com and companyname.com requests were intended for the web site. But workstation.companyname.com was intended for an internal address.

So, if you're using a private IP scheme for internal addresses, you should not have issues.

That said, here's what we did for the new workstation addresses [in a VERY shortened explanation] inside:

workstation.industryshortname.localizedname.companyname.com

Yes, that's long, but it gives us the opportunity to swallow another corporation and get the two networks working together pretty quickly - should that ever happen.

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by ktamayo In reply to DNS Name Convention

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by ktamayo In reply to DNS Name Convention

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