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DOS/Windows XP partitions

By BrianBooher ·
I have a very interesting situation here.

I would like to know if it possible to run a DOS partition along with a Windows XP partition and have both show up in the boot menu.

The DOS partition runs a program for our engineers that has to communicate with the comm ports and access the hard drive.

We have had problems getting it to work for some time and I just want to know if anyone has any ideas.

This is being put on a laptop, so dual drives is not possible.

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Display a Custom Boot Menu Every Time You Boot Windows XP. Read here..

http://www.askapache.com/windows/custom-boot-menu-in-windows-xp.html

Please post back if you have any more problems or questions.

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Yes, you can do it

by nepenthe0 In reply to DOS/Windows XP partitions

You must install DOS in a partition on the first physical drive (Drive 0) in your system. It must be installed in a Primary (not logical) partition.

If you have a boot diskette from a version of Windows 95 or 98, its version of DOS supports FAT32 partitions. In this case, you can install it on a new partition or on an existing FAT32 partition, even if it's the partition from which XP boots.

If you have only DOS 5 though 6.22, you'll need to install it on a FAT16 partition, because these older DOS versions can't read the FAT32 format. 40MB is probably enough, although your application may need more, and remember that DOS can't handle partitions larger than 2048MB.

Windows XP can't format a FAT16 partition. To format the partition, you'll need to use the FORMAT program that comes with DOS. If you create the partition with the DOS FDISK program, be very careful not to delete any existing partitions.

In particular, if you have already installed Windows XP, be extremely careful if you use MS-DOS Setup diskettes to install DOS. The Setup program will overwrite the partition information for the first drive it finds, and could **** your Windows XP partition out of the water. Your best bet is to use the setup program's install Floppy Disk option, and then copy the program and system files to the hard drive later.

Credit to Robert Cowart, Brian Knittel, Using Windows XP Professional (Que Publishing, 3rd ed., 2005), ch. 31, pp. 1227-28

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XP can't format a FAT16 partition ? ~ RUBBISH !! ...

by OldER Mycroft In reply to Yes, you can do it

Perhaps we ought to ask M$:

Windows XP supports the creation of primary partitions and logical drives of up to 4 gigabytes (GB) using the FAT16 file system. The maximum cluster size is 64K.

The 4-GB partition limit is imposed by the maximum number of clusters and the largest cluster size supported by the FAT file system. In Windows XP, FAT16 is limited to 64K clusters. Multiply the maximum number of clusters (64k) by the maximum cluster size (64K), and the result is 4GB. In addition to Windows XP, Microsoft Windows 2000 and Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 also support FAT16 volumes up to 4GB in size.

FAT16 volumes larger than 2GB are not accessible from computers running Microsoft Windows Millennium Edition (Me), Windows 98, Windows 95, or MS-DOS. The size limit for FAT16 volumes in these operating systems is 2 GB. In other words, to maintain compatibility with Windows Me, Windows 98, Windows 95, or MS-DOS, a volume cannot be larger than 2 GB. For additional information about FAT16 drive and partition size limits in Windows Me, Windows 98, Windows 95, and MS-DOS, click the article numbers below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
118335 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/118335/) Maximum partition size using FAT16 file system .

I despair at the junk you come out with.

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Something else to consider

by Jacky Howe In reply to DOS/Windows XP partitions

I take it that the Sofware won't run from a Command Shell under Windows and it also can't be run in Compatability Mode?
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You didn't say which Version of DOS you are going to use.
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It may work under Virtual PC 2007
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Read up on the documentation that comes with the software.
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Virtual PC 2007 Release Notes
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http://download.microsoft.com/download/4/4/c/44ccd131-67fb-4224-a96e-193be1765b43/relnotes.htm
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Download the full version of Microsoft Virtual PC 2007
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http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyId=04D26402-3199-48A3-AFA2-2DC0B40A73B6&displaylang=en
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I haven't tested this but it looks feasible.
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How to create a Virtual PC hard disk image by using a backup disk image file
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INTRODUCTION
This step-by-step article describes how to create a Microsoft Virtual PC virtual hard disk that is an identical copy of a physical hard disk by using a backup disk image file.
MORE INFORMATION
To create a Virtual PC hard disk image by using a backup disk image file, follow these steps.
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Note You must have administrator credentials on the Virtual PC host computer.
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1. Create a backup disc image file and a recovery disc of the physical source computer by using the recovery or backup program that you prefer.
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Note The backup image taken from GHOST is not supported.
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2. Copy the backup disk image to a disk volume (partition) that does not have Virtual PC installed.
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3. Use the Virtual Disk Wizard to create a virtual hard disk image.
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Important To complete this procedure, the amount of free space that is available on the disk where you store the disk image must be larger than the size of the disk of which you want to create an image.
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a. Start Microsoft Virtual PC, click File, click Virtual Disk Wizard, and then click Next.
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b. Click Create new virtual disk, click Next, click A virtual hard disk, and then click Next.
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c. Click Browse, locate the folder where you want to save the disk image, type a name for the new disk image, click Save, and then click Next.
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d. In the Virtual Hard Disk Options dialog box, click Linked to a hard disk (Advanced).
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e. In the Caution - Virtual PC dialog box, click OK, and then click Next.
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f. Select the volume that contains the disk image from which you want to create a virtual disk, click Next, and then click Finish.
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4. Use the Virtual Disk Wizard again to create an expandable disk image:
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a. Start Microsoft Virtual PC, click File, click Virtual Disk Wizard, and then click Next.
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b. Click Create new virtual disk, click Next, click A virtual hard disk, and then click Next.
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c. Click Browse, locate the folder where you want to save the disk image, type a name for the new disk image, click Save, and then click Next.
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d. In the Virtual Hard Disk Options dialog box, click Dynamically expanding (Recommended).
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e. In the Virtual hard disk size box, type the disk size that you want, and then click Next.
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Note The available hard disk space on the host computer limits the actual hard disk image size. You can create a hard disk image that is larger than the available hard disk space on the host computer. However, the hard disk image expands to use only the hard disk space that is available on the volume where you create the hard disk image.
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f. Click Finish, and then click Close.
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5. Create a new virtual machine:
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a. Start Microsoft Virtual PC, click File, click New Virtual Machine Wizard, and then click Next.
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b. In the Options dialog box, click Use default settings to create a virtual machine, and then click Next.
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c. In the Name and location dialog box, click Browse to locate the folder where you want to save the virtual machine, type a name for the virtual machine name, click Save, and then click Next.
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d. Click to select the When I click Finish, open settings check box, and then click Finish.
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e. In the Settings for Virtual_Machine_Name dialog box, click Hard Disk 1, click Virtual hard disk file, and then click Browse.
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f. Locate and then click the expandable virtual disk file that you created in step 3, and then click Open.
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g. In the Settings for Virtual_Machine_Name dialog box, click Hard Disk 2, click Virtual hard disk file, and then click Browse.
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h. Locate and then click the virtual hard disk file that you created in step 2, click Open, and then click OK.
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6. Start the newly created virtual machine by using the recovery disk that you created in step 1.
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7. Restore the backup image from drive D to drive C.
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Note You can remove drive D after the virtual machine restarts the first time after the restore operation. You can do this because you do not need drive D after you copy the backup image to drive C.
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