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DOWNLOA Five tips for coaching young support pros

By JodyGilbert ·
http://techrepublic.com.com/5138-10878-5754273.html

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Coaching young support pros

by Rkallianpur In reply to DOWNLOAD: Five tips for ...

When I used to direct an faculty/academic computing support group about 10 years ago, I had to recruit a lot of graduate students and student workers to help me in our efforts towards creating a good transition for faculty members to begin using technology.

I hired student workers not on the basis of what they knew at that point in time - I hired them on the basis of how anxious they were about learning something and how eager they were in sharing that knowledge and interest. If they had those intrinsic qualities teaching them a new tool or a new resource was a breeze. This was critical for the success of our support group in making faculty members feel comfortable in the process of technology adoption since they were not dealing with "technology geeks" and they felt a lot less intimidated and a lot more accepting.

It is critical that our support staff drop jargon and acronyms from their vocabulary and understand that technology IS a tool and not an end unto itself.

Sincerely,
Ravi Kallianpur

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Sharing information is key

by beads In reply to Coaching young support pr ...

Back in someone else old days you could feel as though you pretty much "knew everything". Well, not really but you could still feel that way by reading Byte magazine and a small handfull of other journals.

The first thing I really try to instill in beginning techs is that you have to develop your communication skills to include sharing of information. Keep the jargon for the discussions with other techs and keep it simple with non-techs.

The second most important thing is to FREELY share your information when appropriate. No one learns in a vacuum in IT land. It just feels that way sometimes. Those few individuals who do or have learned in some miraculous vacuum, tend to have the worst communication skills.

- beads

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Non-communicators become...

by RayJeff In reply to Sharing information is ke ...

"The second most important thing is to FREELY share your information when appropriate. No one learns in a vacuum in IT land. It just feels that way sometimes. Those few individuals who do or have learned in some miraculous vacuum, tend to have the worst communication skills."

Non-communicators of today become
the IT directors /managers/CIOs of tomorrow. I know, I work with one.

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Remember that you don't know everything!

by tjackson In reply to DOWNLOAD: Five tips for ...

While you do want to encourage and cultivate self confidence, make sure that your young support pros realize that they don't know all there is to know about IT. It has been my experience that you learn something new everyday - and sometimes from a newbie who asks a simple question. Never, ever feel that just because you have a certification that you have all the right answers. Always be open to learning something new from anyone and everyone.

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