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dual boot

By mktz ·
can someone explain to me in detail how to set up a dual boot system with xp and redhat 7.2 and explain the process on partitioning in linux. I am new to linux and dont understand the terms such as / /root /usr /ver etc i dont know what size a swap partition should be or the size of the operating system partition should be. Also is it possible to install linux redhat server on a dual boot also. Thanks

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by Alpha-Male In reply to dual boot

Use fdisk to partition your drive.

Install Windows XP on the first partition.

Start your Linux Installation and install the /root directory into the second partition.

Install LILO into the first sector of your boot partition (usually /boot) and not in the MBR.

Make a boot disk during the Linux installation if possible so that you can boot into it.

Now boot into Linux and copy the boot image from the boot sector. To do this run: dd if=/dev/hdan of=/bootsect.lnx bs=512 count=1,where /dev/hdan is the location of /boot and /bootsect.lnx is the Linux boot image. Copy this bootsect.lnx file to a safe location where you can reach it using Windows.

Reboot into Windows XP and copy this bootsect.lnx file into the root directory (C:\).

Edit c:\boot.ini and append the following line: c:\bootsect.lnx="Linux".
Reboot your system and boot directly from the hard disk.

The Windows NT boot loader should now give you the option of booting into either Windows XP or Linux. Try booting into both of them to see if you were successful.

Take a look here for help installing RH Linux 7.2

http://www.redhat.com/docs/manuals/linux/RHL-7.2-Manual/install-guide/

For information on partitioning in Linux (through Disk Druid, Fdisk or whatever you choose):

http://www.redhat.com/docs/manuals/linux/RHL-7.2-Manual/install-guide/s1-guimode-partitioning.html

Hope this helps! Good luck...

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by mktz In reply to dual boot

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by dsuski In reply to dual boot

you could consider the "grub", it will give you a lot of control over your computer's booting process. You may need to do some RTFM on the partitioning, but after you are thru with it, thou shalt be the king. Read on grub on the internet, the docs are widely accesible and easy to follow

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by mktz In reply to dual boot

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by rfiore In reply to dual boot

LINUX uses several directories to store everything in.

/ is also called root. It is the basic start of your file system. There are two partitions that you need to have one is / and the other is SWAP. All other partitions connected (mounted) onto the root as directories. If /root is a separate partition from /, it will mount into the directory /root. If it is not a seperate partition, all the files will be stored on the / partition under the directory of root.

/root is the home directory for the master account of linux. When you log in as root, this is the directory your shell will start in.

/usr is where all the user and OS programs are installed.

/boot is where most the information to boot linux is installed. If your are creating a large linux partition, the installer for Red Hat will recommend that create this as a separate partition.

SWAP is disk space used to emulate memory. The size will depend on the amount of disk space available, amount of memory in the machine, and what you will be using the machine for. On a general purpose machine, I usually make a SWAP of 300-500 just to cover the bases.

The only things for linux you need as a seperate partition is / and SWAP (and possibly /boot according tothe size of the / partition).

Now with the linux partition basics out of the way, I would load XP on the disk first. Just leave space that you will use for linux as free space for now.

After XP is loaded. Boot the redhat CD and follow the prompts. When you get to the point of partitioning, select that you want to do it yourself. Your need to create your SWAP partition, / partition, and possibly the /boot partition. After that follow the prompts to get Linux installed.

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by mktz In reply to dual boot

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by mktz In reply to dual boot

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