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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--11/9/00

By ebott ·
Microsoft just released Beta 1 of Whistler, its next Windows version. This sweeping operating system update includes options for two different interfaces--a newly designed front end intended for nontechnical users, and the "classic" Windows 2000 interface. Surprisingly, Microsoft's product managers say they'll be redesigning the interface up until the last weeks of development. That's an opportunity for people like you and me to make a difference. So register your opinions here: If you were in charge of overhauling the Windows desktop, what would you do first? Which features would you ditch? Which would you redesign? Which would you keep? Believe it or not, this is a serious opportunity to make a difference in the next Windows version. I'll summarize the best responses in my next column, and I'll also pass them along to the folks at Microsoft who are redoing the Windows UI. Maybe, just maybe, we can collectively make a difference in the next version of Windows.

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--11/9/00

by Magetower In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

One of the first things I'd add to the existing configuration is the ability to adjust the location of the Start button when repositioning the Taskbar. (For instance, it would be nice to have the button remain on the bottom when the bar is placed onthe left hand side of the screen.)

Another interesting addition would be the capability to add additional taskbars to the other edges of the screen.

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--11/9/00

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--11/9/00

by BuckSommerkamp In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

High on my priority list would be some way to print a folder listing. Right now, we can certainly drop to a command prompt and type DIR > LPT1: or do something like a printscreen-then-paste into Wordpad then print...but why should we gyrate like this? Getting an accurate, printed listing of folders/directories is something I would have expected to happen a long time ago.

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--11/9/00

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--11/9/00

by loftis_marvin In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

What I would like to see, and this applies basicaly to all windows, is a centralized tools and utilities menue off of the start menue. This stops us from having to look under the system information for things like dr.watson, scan reg, reg check and the other tools that are pretty much moved around. I mean every version of windows that comes out they move the utilities around. it would be nice to have all the utilities in one spot.

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--11/9/00

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--11/9/00

by kbeckett In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

The Windows GUI sure has come a long way over the years, but one of my biggest complaints remains the fact that most dialog boxes aren't re-sizeable. Windows is full of "dinky" dialogs designed to fit on 640x480 screens, and these dialogs often havescrollable lists that can only display a few lines of data, and also require horizontal scrolling. Most computers today use a minimum of 1024x768 resolution, and yet we must painfully scroll these little lists, like trying to work while wearing blacked-out goggles with small holes punched in them. The intuitive idea of stretching the dialog box with the mouse almost never works!

The Organize Favorites dialog in IE is the only exception to this rule that I can think of at the moment, but eventhen - it doesn't remember it's new size, so you have to re-stretch it upon every use.

This problem extends from the OS to all applications that use it. Why? Because there's no direct support for this feature in the OS, so it requires extra work for all application developers to provide such a feature.

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--11/9/00

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--11/9/00

by LynnP In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

I make extensive use of the Office shortcut bar, so all of the things I use regularly (including shortcuts to admin tools, certain applications, and template documents) are handy, yet not in the way. I'd like to see that feature moved into Windows, and easily customizable (the Office 2000 version is more difficult to customize than the Office 97 version).

I'd also like access to everything that runs at startup (maybe something like the Windows 2000 interface in the MMC), without having to resort to Registry hacks to find out that some app has slithered in a sneaky little routine that's impacting system performance, or merrily sending info about my system over the Internet without my consent. I want to be able to enable or disable theselittle monsters with a click, just as I can in W2K when adjusting security settings.

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--11/9/00

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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