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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--May 4, 20

By ebott ·
According to Microsoft, you should never use an administrative account for everyday use, especially if you're connected to the Internet. But that causes big headaches for power users who want to install new applications. In fact, many install programs simply won't run unless you have administrative rights. What sort of best practices should Windows 2000 Professional users follow when installing new software? Do I always have to be logged on as Administrator? Help me put together some do's and don'ts for third-party programs.

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--May 4, 20

by guy In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

I have two short suggestions:
a) Windows 2000 has the RunAs option wherby you just enter the administrators name and password then run the program.
b) Even as IT professional, I find the ReadMe files invaluable to check how to install the program.

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--May 4, 20

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--May 4, 20

by jclagget In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

I've been using Win2000 Professional for a couple of months now and installed everything as an administrator equivilant and have had no problems

I think where you will run into problems is the Terminal Server portion of 2000Server. There are certain DLLs that must be installed correctly as the administrator of the domain and must be done at the console.

Hope this helps

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--May 4, 20

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--May 4, 20

by tysonmathews In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

I can't speak specifically about W2K, however with most multiuser OS's, if not
all, it is a good practice to have both a normal and admin account, and only
use the admin account when necessary, such as, to install TRUSTED software.
Untrusted software should be installed/run from a normal user account to insure
that whatever malicious acts it may do does not affect your entire system.
Using both admin and non-admin pretty much makes trojans impractical, since
they cannot alter system resources that could be used to load the trojan on
startup. Despite whatever awkwardness there may be, this protection is worth it
(especially with police departments exploring the joys of dirt). D.I.R.T. Digital Interception by Remote Transmision.
http://www.codexdatasystems.com/cdsnews.html to read about it.

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--May 4, 20

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--May 4, 20

by vijays2000 In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

Although i haven't worked on 2000 much but i think what microsoft means by saying administrative account should not be used for everyday pupose specially if u'r connected to internet is because of possibility of hacking and virus infection in which exposed files may get affected and as administor does'nt have any unexposed are the max. risk is with administrative account in above said case. And it would be a good practice to have a normal user account .As far as installing programs are concerned no one is going to install two thee software a day and won't be such a big headache for power user.

vijays2000@hotmail.com

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--May 4, 20

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--May 4, 20

by Oliver W. In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

Win2000 Stand Alone Users should use a power-user account for everyday use, and should use the "run as"-Option for installing Software they trust.

In a Network Enviroment an administrator could use: Active Directory, Group Policies and the MSI Technology to distribute or advertise software in the network.
The other possibility in the network is, that a "power"-user requests to install a software component and the administrator puts him to the "install"(Admin) group for a while to grant access to System Files.

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--May 4, 20

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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