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False information on resume - ever do it?

By silvioandpauly ·
OK folks - still looking for a new job, and I was thinking about stretching the truth on the resume. Things like saying I have a degree (I don't) and certified training on the newer stuff. Look - I don't mean lying about things I don't know about, just the goofy details that get you past the screeners. I learned the new stuff on my own and I can hold my own against most techies....

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Stretching truth = lying

by speedracer94 In reply to False information on resu ...

Lying is a false statement deliberately presented as being true. Stretching the truth is the same as telling a lie.

If you state that you have a degree and you don't, you've told a lie. If you state that you have certified training on new hardware/software and you don't, you've told a lie. Degrees and certifications are hardly "goofy details".

I don't believe that telling a lie on your resume is a path you want to travel. I'm sure it looks inviting to lie to get where you want to go, but I strongly advise against it.

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likewise

by TonytheTiger In reply to Stretching truth = lying

It can come back to haunt you ... years, or even decades later.

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Bottom line

by Trek05 In reply to Stretching truth = lying

One day they will call your bluff, or somehow it will slip out in casual conversation that you don't have the "goofy" certifications. Be proactive. Demonstrate to your employer, or future employer, that your knowledge and abilities can go head to head with someone with certified credentials. Let your actions speak.

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never ever add-on

by ijusth In reply to Bottom line

what you SHOULD do is use this to your advantage. The big thing is that you actually HAVE to do this. Tell the company that you are actively working on your degree and that your technical skills arefrom the best school - the school of hard knocks and you are self taught. DO NOT put down the certification however. You don't know that the person you are talking to doesn't have it and considers it a badge of honor. tell him that you want to get the diploma and hopefully you can get the time (since your college classes need to come first).

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never ever add-on

by ijusth In reply to Bottom line

what you SHOULD do is use this to your advantage. The big thing is that you actually HAVE to do this. Tell the company that you are actively working on your degree and that your technical skills arefrom the best school - the school of hard knocks and you are self taught. DO NOT put down the certification however. You don't know that the person you are talking to doesn't have it and considers it a badge of honor. tell him that you want to get the diploma and hopefully you can get the time (since your college classes need to come first). This shows that you have a plan of action, desitre to improve and self motivated.

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Lies

by Ou Jipi je In reply to Stretching truth = lying

You don't have to lie. The thing on the other hand is that not all the recruiters are as competent as they are presented here. ****, most of them likely lied on their resumes to get the gig themselves.

So if you want to pass the first line and think you have enough insight to score the job once you got the interview, I would advice not to get too specific on your resume.

Short to the point outline your knowledge and experience but don't include unnecessary details.

If you get the interview, answer truthfully and show that you got what it takes to take on the job. Say I don't know (but I know where to look for an answer) if you don't. Don't lie.

Be yourself. If you are not and you will get the job you either gonne have to pretend being someone else during your time of stay or become yourself and have people ackowledge that you have misslead them during of the interview.

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Grilling candidates reveals embellishments

by jfosc In reply to Stretching truth = lying

Unfortunately, most people "embellish" their resume. Besides questions about what is actually on the resume, my colleagues and I grill the candidates technically about important concepts. The goal is not who gets the most questions right, but rather to find out how technically competent they are.

I find this method weeds out the liars and embellishers. Scenario questioning shows analytical thinking ability, and generally tough questions show how they handle pressure.

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Jfosc

by Ou Jipi je In reply to Grilling candidates revea ...

Sounds good although you need to be able to do that without embarassing yourself (I assume you can). I was once at an "grill" interview in which I got into a simmilar situation.

After I answered the questions either correctly or "I don't know", I started to ask questions myself.

After a while, I have realized that the person "grilling me" was basically working according to a script with the list of questions that he has put together (and looked up the answers of course).

When I asked return questions more "in-depth" on the subject I noticed that they knew little about topics they were asking about.

At some point I asked something along the lines of "how important is it to understand what the questions mean". Then I asked how do they deal with situations like these in their environment.

They started to draw out a bunch on unbelievable non-sense while I continued to ask questions.

I have had an amusing afternoon and did not felt dissapointed at all. I have left the interview saying: "Although I would be delighted to join a company like yours, I have realized that my competences are far below your expectations."

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grillers

by IS_Oldie In reply to Jfosc

You're right about how ridiculous it is to be grilled by someone with a script. There are places that give an interviewer a huge list of questions on a specific skillset from which they can pick randomly. You mess up on the random questions, they get to assume you don't know anything. What a loss for the hiring company !

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Grilling Clarification

by jfosc In reply to grillers

I am usually verbose but decided to keep my previous post short and to the point, but I feel I need to clarify.

IMHO, "grilling" needs to be done by a qualified person and at the correct level. I've been in the IT industry for 15 years, yet I make it a point to ask questions appropriate to the position and the expected experience level of the candidate. I?m not a recruiter ? I work for a tech company and I have hands-on, project management, and consulting background.

I sometimes do ask questions beyond the expected experience level to see what the responses are - as I said before, a wrong answer or "I don't know" is not necessarily a bad thing. I use it to gauge their knowledge and experience, and I explain that to the candidates. It would be ridiculous if I were to think someone with 5 years experience would know as much as someone with 10 years experience, but these types of questions have worked for me. I make it a point to be completely upfront and honest with the candidates as I expect that from them. If they don?t know something, they don?t know it. If they know it, they know it. That?s reality. No one knows everything. I am more interested in someone?s abilities to be technically flexible and learn rather than someone who has used a specific product. I?m more concerned that they understand the fundamentals of how e-mail works rather than whether or not they have used MS Exchange. Some people admin Exchange and don?t know what they?re doing ? I?d rather have the person who understands how things should work and then have them learn the tool.

I look at everything in terms of applicability to the position: skills, work ethic, ability to work under pressure, career-mindedness, and more. I don?t believe in working off a script ? I conduct interviews with nothing more than a review of the candidate?s resume as applicable to the position. I also try to spend at least one hour with each candidate. I still feel that?s not enough time to really get to know someone well, but I don?t feel it does a candidate justice to judge them solely on their resume and 15 minutes of time. I?ve interviewed good people with terrible resumes and not-so-good people with great looking resumes. Let?s face reality - technical people, including myself, sometimes are not that great at selling themselves. I try to provide a venue in which they can sell themselves by showing me their real skills ? not by how well their resume looks on paper.

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