General discussion

Locked

Fault Tolerance Preference

By Debbie at New Directions ·
I recently purchased a new Gateway 7210 Server and am making decisions on implementing it on our current network. Gateway tells me that I must use HARDWARE FAULT TOLERANCE rather than the SOFTWARE FAULT TOLERANCE in Windows NT 4.0.

Do you have any information on the pros and cons of this scenario? Any articles about this out there?

This conversation is currently closed to new comments.

15 total posts (Page 1 of 2)   01 | 02   Next
| Thread display: Collapse - | Expand +

All Comments

Collapse -

Fault Tolerance Preference

by RedHook In reply to Fault Tolerance Preferenc ...

They want to sell you a RAID box. We use NT's disk mirroring with each disk on its own scsi card. This, along with an agressive backup strategy, makes us pretty confident that our data are safe.

Save your money.

RKS

Collapse -

Fault Tolerance Preference

Poster rated this answer

Collapse -

Fault Tolerance Preference

by -Q-240248 In reply to Fault Tolerance Preferenc ...

A hardware solution, which you may alre4ady have on your new server is much more preferred than ANY software solution, including NTs. Not only do you get better performance but you also get better management capabilities.

btw..Using 2 SCSI controllers means you're duplexing and mirroring. Duplexing is much more expensive than a RAID 5 configuration. My suggestion is to use a RAID 5 hardware solution.

Collapse -

Fault Tolerance Preference

by -Q-240248 In reply to Fault Tolerance Preferenc ...

With your updated comment in mind, you cannot use the current drives in a RAID 5 configuration, since you need at least 3 drives of the same size in order to configure a RAID 5 configuration. You can do a hardware mirroring RAID though however. I would suggest purchasing a RAID controller.

Collapse -

Fault Tolerance Preference

Poster rated this answer

Collapse -

Fault Tolerance Preference

I forgot to mention that this server will be a member server running Windows NT 4.0 Terminal Server Edition. We plan on putting all apps and data on this server. There will be 50 users logging in to sessions on the server. We have two 9GB drives and two 18.2GB drives with dual 600 MHz processors - 1GB RAM.

Collapse -

Fault Tolerance Preference

I had a similar situation with Dell. The truth of the matter is, Software RAID is more difficult to recover from than hardware RAID. Also, many companies don't want you opening their servers unless you are certified on thier "platform". If you use software RAID, chances are that you will need to open the box to change out a HDD where with hardware RAID, all the drives are sitting out front and are "hot-swappable". With out Hardware RAID, you need to "down" you server to change the drives.

Collapse -

Fault Tolerance Preference

Poster rated this answer

Collapse -

Fault Tolerance Preference

by ratherbfishing In reply to Fault Tolerance Preferenc ...

All posts have good advice, but the biggest issue for your box, because it is running Terminal Server, is performance. You need all the performance you can get to run your applications.

Software RAID uses the servers resources to do its thing, and really drags on the performance. Hardware RAID has its own cpu and cache, and offers far better performance. I learned this the hard way.

Collapse -

Fault Tolerance Preference

Poster rated this answer

Back to Windows Forum
15 total posts (Page 1 of 2)   01 | 02   Next

Related Discussions

Related Forums