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Finding A Job In IT At 50

By gforce44 ·
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Finding Work

by gforce44 In reply to Finding A Job In IT At 50

<p>I'm a 50 year old IT person with 30 years of <strong>IT</strong> experience.  Most of my experience is in Operations & Technical support.  I was retired from my job in September of 2003 because my position was relocated to North Caroliner.  I took some time off to address a medical issue then started seeking employment the following year.  I've applied for operations/technical support and consulting positions.  I've sent my resume to at lease 50 employers and have had several interviews but no job.  I know the the <strong>IT</strong> job market is tight in New York City so I'm concidering persuing another area of interest in the <strong>IT</strong> field, which means going back to school.  Unfortunately, there are so many <strong>IT </strong>professional out of work because of company downsizing and outsourcing, many of us are competing for the few positions that are available in New York City.</p>
<p> </p>

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Finding Work

by Hypatia In reply to Finding Work

<p>Not knowing where in IT your experience is, it's a little hard to give a specific response.  And not knowing what kind of IT work you are looking for or willing to do.</p>
<p>I am over 50, just out of school and starting my IT career and Lockheed Martin hired me.  They practice what they preach when it comes to diversity.</p>
<p>Also, with the kind of experience you have... if you have EVER thought about teaching, I bet you could find a community college or technical college (like ITT) that would snatch you up in a heartbeat.  You don't need teaching credentials to teach a 'trade' which is the category IT falls into.  My local community college has more than one instructor on staff that either only has an A.A.S. that they recieved from the school OR are individuals who worked in the IT industry.</p>
<p>Another possibility, ever thought of going into business for yourself?  Small Businesses and individuals can't afford the "big guys" to come help 'em out with techie problems or training but on a piece by piece basis you can build a pretty solid foundation of clients.</p>
<p>This is all assuming you don't WANT to leave IT.  If you do ... go for it!  Never too late to learn new tricks ;-)</p>

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Finding Work

by iamnorthwind In reply to Finding Work

<p>It's your post and those like the commenter above myself, that are inspiring.</p>
<p>I am a 33-year old "young buck" and can say that working with people much my senior is a rare honour. I wish you the best of luck, and think that actually if you have the passion for it, many different areas in the I.T. world would be great for you.</p>
<p>Believe it or not - there are large corporations now hiring and paying decent wages for "Bloggers." Something considered much "crazier" than hiring people older than the interviewer...</p>
<p>Definitely don't give up hope - even us young bucks will be 50, then 60, and so on...and will need some income, and/or passionate undertakings that make a difference.</p>
<p>Keep us posted!</p>

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Finding Work

by lesko In reply to Finding Work

having 30 years of experience tells me you were there during the haydays of the mainframe <br />
there are lots and lots of openings for mainframe skills at Dice and Monster. In fact one of the <br />
articles here at tech republic mentioned that mainframe skills is the hotest thing right now as<br />
most people with the skills are retiring and the colleges are no longer training students on it.<br />
<br />
might be something worth looking into.<br />
<br />

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Finding Work

by warbears In reply to Finding Work

<p>I have to e<span><font size="2">mpathize </font></span><span><font size="2">with your problem. I am now 55. I changed what was a successful career in banking&nbsp I was a VP of operations..........I was sent to tech class, after tech class (starting with DOS in the 80's) to keep up with, at that time.. a vision of the future in computers. ). The banking industry in my region, was going through one buy out or shut down after another so around the year 2000 I went back to school to add to my education, this time getting certified with a MCSE, A+, Webmaster and the equalivent of a AA Degree. </font></span></p>
<p><span><font size="2">But it seemed I was doomed. The "dot com" era was upon us and although I had no trouble finding work, it didn't last long. One company after another bit the dust. I tried teaching for two years but found that I prefered working on problems, hardware....network.....whatever. </font></span></p>
<p><span><font size="2">That was almost 4 years ago now. Since then I have been with 4 companies...all since gone. Since March of this year, I have sent out almost 400 resumes, and I am still unemployed.  I have grey hair now and my wife thinks it is <span>Distinguished</span>. It is a curse from my point of view.  The interviews I have been to, have been interesting. I come from an arena and a era where you wear a suit and tie when asked to be interviewed. You also come prepared with a knowledge of the company you are applying with. Since I have been in the position of having to inteview in my past career, I feel like I knew what would be asked of me. WRONG! </font></span></p>
<p><span><font size="2">I have sat next to other potential individuals, waiting for their inteviews, that wore everthing from jeans and a golf shirt to thongs and shorts. Everthing from spiked hair to purple hair. Everthing from a stud in the ear to 8 different kinds of pierceings all over the face. Now I am not a prude. I have 5 children. Their friends think I am the "coolest geek" around. And certainly I have seen this before. In fact at the last job, I usually wore "business casual" to work. We are after all, required to crawl under desks and other assorted tasks, that would be awkward with tie and somtimes very dirty. But in the same sentence, we work around people that do wear ties and skirts. Therefore, slacks and a nice golf shirt seemed appropiate. You can imagine my shock when I started, when I saw my boss in jeans filled with holes and a t-shirt I would only wear washing the car. My other associate, was in shorts, thongs and a simlilar t-shirt. I was always a work 15 minutes or more early and the others were always 15 minutes or more late. (One day they went out to lunch and left me alone. Not a big deal except that the policy of the company was that there was always to be two techs there during regular business hours. Still not a big deal, until they took a extended lunch (which I found out was not uncommon) for 3 hours and went looking at cars for the afternoon. Unfortunately, the main server went down while they were gone and the chaos that followed for the 200 or so employees was a nightmare. Although I was given 6 awards for outstanding service to the company and its associates, the first 8 months I was there, I got various <span><span>anonymous</span></span> hate letters that said I should guit and to "get out", in the later days with that company. They got more vicious as the months went by. I finally informed the HR dept and the VP of the company, but nothing was done. All they could do was wait and watch.</font></span></p>
<p><span><font size="2">I left the company because of this pressure and threats that could have perhaps acted on,  and it was purchased by a bigger company and lay offs were the order of the day. I still keep in contact with friends I made in other depts, that inform me that there is a new dress code, and other changes have been made for the better. That I should be proud of the example I set. It doesn't help me now except I get to add another recommendation to the pile I already have.</font></span></p>
<p><span><font size="2">The other problem in trying to find a job is the old " your over qualified" statement. Which is to say, your old, you are experienced and educated and it might threaten me, and we don't want to pay you what you are worth. (even when you apply to "entry level" phone tech positions.) </font></span></p>
<p><span><font size="2">I never believed there was the kind of bias that I have been reading about, over the last few years, directed at what has been called "baby boomer discrimination" or "the grey plauge". I state here and now.........it is true and getting worse.</font></span></p>
<p><span><font size="2">I have been entertaining the thought of my own business. I have been doing "free" consulting, installations and other computer, network and web related items over the past 4-5 months for friends that have business's, neighbors and relatives and their friends. Seems that there may be a nitch that I could fill. But marketing has never been my strong suit. Word of mouth won't generate enough business, at least in the begining, to earn a living. </font></span></p>
<p><span><font size="2">If anybody reads this that has some experience in this regard or any pitfalls they would like to share.....I would appreciate the advice. </font></span></p>
<p><span><font size="2">As for being a baby boomer.............I e<span>mpathize.</span></font></span></p>

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Finding Work

by frwagne In reply to Finding Work

<p>You need to do some 'informational interviewing' - contact some local businesses or government agencies, as to speak to their IT person, ask for 30 minutes of their time for some career advice. Let them ask about your experience, see what advice they can offer, given their knowledge of the IT market from their current, inside perspective. Ask them for names of other folks you could also interview with that could provide additional insight/guidance. we're all willing to help, but you haven't given us much actual content to advise you with. (I'm 62 myself, been doing PC and LAN stuff for 20 years, currently managing a document imaging system, have had a couple of weeks of  employer-paid training on both front end and back end applications for it). There are also 'legacy' apps written in Cobol where there is a huge shortage of people left to maintain them. There are also MUMPS apps out there, even Pick and Unidata apps - get on google and put in search words that describe some of your experience.</p>
<p><a href="mailto:Fred_Wagner@longbeach.gov">Fred_Wagner@longbeach.gov</a></p>

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Finding Work

by Dendubs In reply to Finding Work

I also recently turned 50 and have lots of "Sorry you're overqualified" to my credit, mostly from agencies. I have been looking for work for almost a year and have applied to literally hundreds of jobs. I am always hopeful but the reality I am facing is grim. There is a new website that holds promise... <a href="http://www.prime50.com">www.prime50.com</a>, an agency for over 50 job seekers. By the way guys.... it's only in Canada..... 

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Finding Work

by Abraham Oc?n In reply to Finding Work

<p><strong>What about consulting?</strong></p>
<p> </p>
<p>I have 34 y/o, and almost 20 of experience in computers. Earning money about 16 years of experience.</p>
<p>Funny thing, most of my work time has been as a consultant. It has pros and cons. Now, for your 30 years of experience, you could become a consultant. You have the presence (some gray hair?), experience and probably a fat resumee.</p>
<p>An uncle of mine is 60. He worked as employee until 2 or 3 years from now. He tried to retire himself, but his old employeer needed him so hired him as consultant. Then, he finished that consultancy and another become. So he is working now and retired at the same time.</p>
<p>Probably you can find consultancy jobs with old employers and/or friends. Even more, maybe you could start a little consultancy company. </p>
<p>Just remember the big amount of small business now. They can?t afford to have an IT Department. So who help them? Consultants!! </p>
<p>Also, you can specialize yourself as an auditing consultant. Most of the companies are having problems with security issues. So you just have to find what companies are in trouble and offer your services as "their hero".</p>
<p>Good luck and God bless you. You will find something for sure.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Abraham</p>

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How Do Hackers Access A PC?

by gforce44 In reply to Finding A Job In IT At 50

<p>I'm curious, how does a hacker access your PC?  Does he or she see your IP address and have special software to gain access?  How is it done?</p>

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How Do Hackers Access A PC?

by parthiv_13 In reply to How Do Hackers Access A P ...

<p>First thing you would like to HACK someone's PC it seems from your question's formatting and structure. OK never mind I will tell you only how it works in simple way. But not the whole thing as I know.</p>
<p>Yes. Hacker do gain access to your PC by tracing the route of your PC via internet. And they reveal your PC's IP, MAC address and your open ports. One can do the thing by various avail softwares (which I am not going to tell you cz I am myself a Network Administartor so would like to keep network clean without hackers).</p>
<p>This thing can be done by trojan mails, chat sessions, etc... in that they sniffs your packets and gets your data.</p>
<p>Dear "DON'T TRY TO DO THAT" its known as CRIME.</p>

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