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General Question - PC Kits

By ideafixer ·
I know the essentials of PC troubleshooting, networking ect. I was considering purchasing one of those PC kits to build a PC. Looks like you get a great deal with that and I am looking foreword to the learning process that goes along with it.

Iwas wondering, with the kit do you get everything you need to assemble the system. Do they come with instructions? What resources should I look at to start this project? By resources I mean web sites or books that may assist in how to configure the hardware.

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General Question - PC Kits

by timwalsh In reply to General Question - PC Kit ...

What do you get: Be careful here. The price may look great but take a look at what you are really getting. The types of components will vary from vendor to vendor. Some vendors sell what they call "bare-bones kits" and thats all they really are (ussually you get a case, motherboard, CPU, memory, floppy and CD drives; no hard drive, monitor or software). You can usually count on the quality of the components NOT being quite top-of-the-line (although this will also vary from vendor to vendor). You probably won't get instructions for assembling the system. You MAY get instructions for adding each component to a system. Do your home work before committing to a purchase.

Resources: There are many books available on the subject of assembling your own PC. There are also MANY Web sites dedicated to building PCs. Go to Google (www.google.com) and run a search on "building a PC" and you will get LOTS of choices.

NOTE: If you are contemplating going this route ("kit PC") as a means to learn about how a PC goes together, this might be a reasonable option. If you are considering this route to acquire a GOOD computer that will last you a while (in addtion to the learning process), you might be better served by doing lots of homework and then buying the separate pieces-parts that best suit your needs/wants. This is not to say that you CAN'T get a good deal with a "kit PC". You many times just don't get any say in the types or quality of the components included.

Goodluck!

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General Question - PC Kits

by ideafixer In reply to General Question - PC Kit ...

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General Question - PC Kits

by opatzg In reply to General Question - PC Kit ...

I'ld have to agree with Tim on this one, you get what you pay for. Instead of buying a kit, you are much better off building the said kit yourself from reliable parts. The case which is an often overlooked part comes with a power supply and I knowthat 90% of the cases out there in the kits I've looked at are underpowered which means you'll need a new power supply as well as the case they supplied you with to get it up and running. On board sound is a wonderful cheap option but replace it with a 5 or 7 slot pci motherboard and add a sound blaster card and gee everything soundwise is now 100% compatible. On board video another neat plus, but actually get a higher end graphics card and watch the textures that were actually created come to life compared with the flat coloring of onboard graphics. Then there's the cdrom, 24x is to slow, 40-52 is where you want and need to be otherwise programs running from the cd can take a lot longer to load through their intros. IE. MS age of empires takes 15 seconds to load through on a 12x dvd (36x-40x cd) and 2 minutes on cd24x. And yes it is fun to build your own pc. If you're having any problems at all post them here and you'll get more help than you can read. I personally would still pick my own parts rather than go with the kit and I also consider upgrading anything other than the hard disk almost a waste of money or time since a built pc should be good for 2 years at its' current built status and after that technology has movedso far that upgrading won't get you much more satisfaction than another 6 months to a year and you'll want to do it again. Have Fun!)

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General Question - PC Kits

by ideafixer In reply to General Question - PC Kit ...

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General Question - PC Kits

by HereInOz In reply to General Question - PC Kit ...

Right on guys.
Buying the bits to do the job is the way to go. It is probable that one real difficulty you will have is to match the motherboard with the processor, if you are a little green in this area. If you have any doubts at all, particularly with the matching of CPU & motherboard, put your ideas here and there will be plenty of comment as to their merits (or otherwise).

The rest of the assembly is a bit like a meccano set (do you have those still??). The greatest fear is at first switch on!

Use a good quality hard drive, as big as you can (you will always fill it), the fastest processor you can afford, and make sure that the motherboard you are using is able to accept a faster processor than the one you have got - future speed increases!! Use as much RAM as you can afford (256Mb at least for Win XP), and a good 300watt power supply at least.

Good luck - it is worth the sweat

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General Question - PC Kits

by ideafixer In reply to General Question - PC Kit ...

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General Question - PC Kits

by sonnguyen In reply to General Question - PC Kit ...

Yes all advice are ok but don't forget your software, adding MS O/S and few other software will make the kit more expensive than those basement machine. Of course building your machine is rather fun you could learn a great deal building it just makesure you earth yourself or wearing a wrist strap against ESD.

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General Question - PC Kits

by ideafixer In reply to General Question - PC Kit ...

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General Question - PC Kits

by jereg In reply to General Question - PC Kit ...

I disagree. I won't build PC's anymore. I'm upgrading my company's PC's, but when I compare the cost of parts/software to a new PC, there's no contest. To buy Microsoft Office and W2K is about $600. To buy a new PC from Dell with that same software,$750. I told my boss that we were upgrading the software, the PC is free. Why do I want to spend time building a PC?
Hope that helps.

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General Question - PC Kits

by ideafixer In reply to General Question - PC Kit ...

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