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    Handling Multiple Staff Resignations in a month

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    by karistetzer ·

    We have had 3 staff resignations in a month. Two have been looking for better suited positions, and one just resigned.

    It had nothing to do with their management.

    What recommendations can you give in handling the situation? We are now having to interview for the 3 vacancies.

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    • #2702900

      Find out why they left

      by oz_media ·

      In reply to Handling Multiple Staff Resignations in a month

      Not what they TOLD you they were leaving for but all those LITTLE things that cause people to finally give up on you.

      What does your competition do that you don’t?

      I contract for a company that has people leaving their jobs to go and work with them all the time. They pick up 4 new techs a year due to unhapy staf at competitors. The competitors think they leave for money, room to grow, stability and a host of other things.

      They still haven’t realized that everyone leaves due to their service manager who is also the office managers wife.

      Another competitor of theirs has emplyes leaving all the time to “learn new tasks and move up”, whereas the truth is the owner doesn’t pay overtime (has an averaging agrement in place) doesn’t pay people properly (instead of raises in salary, he gives them COMISSION even though they don’t sell anything). You don’t have to pay holiday pay on commission so the boss saves and the employees lose. As far as he knows though, they are leaving to move on to bigger ad beter opportunities.

      Do some serious internal examinations, put yuorself in the employees place, hous worked compared to net pay, compare THAT to your competitors. Find out the ofice mentality toward staff members and management ( I know you say it isn’t management but how can you be sure?) You can’t bottom line, you would probably never be told if it was.

      • #2702883

        Handling Multiple Staff Resignations in a month

        by karistetzer ·

        In reply to Find out why they left

        It actually isn’t salary or the management.

        We offered salary increases to keep the staff.

        One staff member, didn’t want to report to her supervisor, but only to herself. She basically was a lost case. Before she reported to us, no one knew her job; and she held that over her old supervisors. When she came to us, we had 3 staff members learn her job. When she submitted her resignation, we accepted it knowing we had members of the team that knew her job.

        The other staff member didn’t want other staff interrupting her with questions about the systems (which was her job). She just wanted to have a certain tasks to do on a day and to complete before she went home. She actually took a huge paycut for her job she is leaving us for.

        The next staff member, didn’t want her work qualitied, which we have a corporate policy to do to ensure accuracy. And, the health benefit deductibles were too much financial strain. Again, we offered her more money; but she didn’t want to have to have quality stats. (And of course we paid incentive comp for exceeding stats in additional to her base salary – which she received)

        We also paid overtime and gave flex time generously to the non-exempt staff.

        In fact, we were more flexible in our department with our staff; than all the depts in the company.

        • #2702864

          Did they all have the same supervisor?

          by admin ·

          In reply to Handling Multiple Staff Resignations in a month

          Most people leave or stay based on their immediate supervisor. This has been documented for many many years and has been bourne out in the majority of my experience.

          Your post sounds like either they all had different supervisors and it really was coincidental or that you do not have the whole story yet.

          If it’s the former, well sometimes everyone has bad luck. Hope that helps. 🙂

        • #2704735

          HR need to be review

          by rgun2515 ·

          In reply to Handling Multiple Staff Resignations in a month

          I would take a look at the person/people that hired the three people that left. And for your sake, I hope the person that will be conducting the interviews to replace them is not the same person. Do yourself a favor. Get more involved with the interview process. Know as much about the person as you can. Skills are important, but can be learned. Attitude is more important than any skill. Look outside the BOX for interviewing ideas. I always try to make the candidate feel as comfortable as I can. That’s how you learn about a person.

          For example.

          1. Interview in the cafeteria instead of the board room. Or take a walk on the company property if the day is nice.

          2. Make the first interview as light as you can. Don’t puch for knowledge. Find out about the person. Hobbies etc.

          3. Begin with a walk around the office. This will make them think they have the job. They will be much more open.

          Then if you like everything about them as a person, bring them back for technical interviews. And again, keep it light. Say something like “I like you but this test is just company policy. Don’t stress over it, no one aces the test.”

        • #2710816

          good idea

          by gsg ·

          In reply to HR need to be review

          We have an interview process that involves the Team Leader that person will report to, and one or two of the team members they will be working with. We start with some of the standard questions, then warn them that we are about to move into some odd questioning. There are no right or wrong answers. We ask things like, Do you like the door open or shut? Music or no music? If you won an expense paid trip today, where would you go? Do you pack the night before, or ahead of time? This gives us an idea of how detail oriented they are, if they are an introvert or extrovert, if they are a “feeler” or a “thinker”. Again, no right or wrong answers, but as we have several new positions available, we might hire the extrovert for the position where they are working directly with people rather than one where they rarely leave their office. This also relaxes the applicant and we get a true picture of their personality and how they would fit with our team. In the 4 years I’ve worked here, we’ve only had 2 people quit or transfer.

        • #2710925

          can I come work for you?

          by puzling ·

          In reply to Handling Multiple Staff Resignations in a month

          🙂

        • #2722100

          I need an IT Auditor – contact me!

          by pjnyusa ·

          In reply to can I come work for you?

          I need an IT Auditor with SOX – contact me!

        • #2706418

          contact me

          by pjnyusa ·

          In reply to can I come work for you?

        • #2710922

          once is an accident twice is conicedence three times is a trend

          by crunchtime ·

          In reply to Handling Multiple Staff Resignations in a month

          You need to spend some serious, honest time with the remaining staff members and get a feel for the attitude and culture of your department.

          You said salary increases were offered to the departing employees. Why were the increases not offered before they turned in their resignations? Were/are you paying market value?

          You have indicated that turnover has not been a problem in the past. Is that because you have a good working environment or because the job market has been depressed?

          This may well be a statistical anomaly. You may run a great shop where employees are generally happy. But remember the old clich?’ “where there is smoke there is fire”.

        • #2710622

          Where is the Fire?

          by dkerta ·

          In reply to once is an accident twice is conicedence three times is a trend

          Crunchtime made shoot the right targets to see some main possibilities of the reason, I could not agree more. In summary it’s covered in 4 list below.
          1. Company financial condition
          2. Working environment
          3. Company culture
          4. Renumeration
          But if you can’t find the “fire” in those areas, I think you need to start to find another job as well, no more challenges will be the last reason why the “young gun”left the organization

          Regards

        • #2710595

          Reply To: Handling Multiple Staff Resignations in a month

          by gordonuk ·

          In reply to once is an accident twice is conicedence three times is a trend

          While I think in your case you may be just unlucky, high turnover is generally caused by benefit/reward loop. If an employee feels that the amount of work or the conditions thay have to work under is not worth the reward they will walk.

          This is precisely my case at present – my (non-technical) Project Manager runs the remote office with an iron hand, generally making all Tech staff’s lives a nightmare – but we put up with it because we are all getting 30% over the market rate for the job.
          It won’t last – eventually our sanity will become more important than the money and we will walk.

        • #2710917

          Living in a different world

          by hexff ·

          In reply to Handling Multiple Staff Resignations in a month

          A minimum your Human Resources and the hiring manager need to devise a better screening process. The reasons they gave seem to be personality driven.

          You don’t want these people on your team to start with ?

          One other thought is to sell a team approach to your I.T. group. It helps the organization, it helps your I.T. groups reputation, and will expose any others that don’t belong on your team !

          On one takeover I endured, everyone but the manager quit. Some ran as a result of the ambiguity in the technology and application changes. Some liked what they were doing and the platform they were on. Some were concerned about where they would land in the new organization.

          In my job market, every I.T. position posted gets hundreds of credible responses. Recruiters are living on monster, yahoo.hotjobs,careerbuilder seeking the most unlikely sets of skills.

          If your Geographically challenged for I.T. workers, I would use a little outsouring, an internship or training program and build my own team…

          If it’s not money, not management, not challenging, then the problem is with the people you inherited.

          Fix the hiring process to get good people …

          Good luck !

          I was the manager, I encouraged those who did not want to travel forward to leave. The CIO of the larger organization gave the same challenge to a group of 250 staff, take the challenge or move on.

        • #2710791

          Blessing in disguise

          by robert.martin ·

          In reply to Handling Multiple Staff Resignations in a month

          To boil down your description of the 3 alumni/ae:

          One wanted to avoid Accountability;
          One wanted to avoid Flexibility;
          One wanted to avoid Quality Control;

          Sounds like you benefitted from their self-sorting without having to pay severance to be rid of 3 bad eggs. It sounds as though you have budgetary resources to attract much better replacements, and goodness knows there are a lot of people in the IT job market these days. So while self-examination may be a useful exercise, I would spend the lion’s share of my time looking for fresh faces, and not self-recriminating. You know the old saying, when God closes a door…

        • #2709779

          Amen

          by itconverter ·

          In reply to Blessing in disguise

          Exactly what I wanted to say and said so well.

          Only 2 months after an annual review and small salary increase – I was offered $6,000 (big boss called me at home) the day I handed in my resignation. Offering the money on the way out the door is too late. In fact – it is quite insulting.

          On the flip side – as a manager inheriting a low-morale team – we lost a few employees (one a month for about 6 months). Most turned out to be a blessing in disguise as they were replaced with even better people (which I got to pick).

        • #3306996

          There are bad team members as well as bad managers

          by a_dangerous_mind ·

          In reply to Amen

          Some team members, regrettably, become ‘partners in crime,’ cover for each other’s problems and lash out at each other’s perceived corporate enemies. I’ve seen cases where sometimes the leaving of these people from a team actually comes from being under a manager that tries to rein them in and hold them accountable. Low morale can come from the side as well as above.

    • #2702856

      Spider Web

      by black panther ·

      In reply to Handling Multiple Staff Resignations in a month

      Normally when a spider’s web is broken, there is always more than one strand affected.

    • #2704563

      Somethings broke – and got to be a reason – did you do an exit interview

      by jimhm ·

      In reply to Handling Multiple Staff Resignations in a month

      There has to be a reason – even those you said had been looking for a better position.. That tells me you have no career path for them to move up…

      Do you do Exit Interviews –

      If you have 3 from the same department in the same month – that tells me there is something very wrong with that department. No Career path – they see no way out of what they are doing – pay raises suck – job is routine – no education offered – no conferences – Some thing is broke and by saying it isn’t the management – How do you know with out an Exit Interview…

      • #2704504

        Somethings broke – and got to be a reason – response

        by karistetzer ·

        In reply to Somethings broke – and got to be a reason – did you do an exit interview

        Actually our HR does the exit interviews, but we have talked with the employees.

        It’s not better positions they were looking for. In fact we have a lot of career paths within the company they can move to. One employee is very task oriented, wants a certain task list to do each day, get it done and start with a new one the next day. The ee current position, tasks to finish may take more than one day. Instead of the higher position, the ee just wanted a processing type position. (The ee actually took a job with less pay and benefits.) The 2nd ee, didn’t like the “quality” part of the position. Of course, we paid bonuses for excellent quality, and the ee’s was above standards. 99% of the jobs in the company require quality stats, so this ee decided to look outside the company for a postion that didn’t require the “quality” portion. Perhaps stressful to attain the 99%.

        So it’s not an option of career path, there are plenty of career opportunities and we encourage all staff and praise them for work well done on a daily basis. We also offer incentive compensation, as well as flex time. We also take them to brunch or breakfast every 3 months to show our appreciation of a job well done.

        • #2704344

          You may of hit it – Stressful job

          by skipperusn ·

          In reply to Somethings broke – and got to be a reason – response

          You may of stepped in it without knowing – Maybe its the stress level of the position. Keeping up with the QA – or other things.

          Don’t know how old these folks are – but a majority of youth today want patted ont he back for doing their job – but doesn’t want any stress or time requirements to do the job.

          So to them it was a very stressful environment and they don’t like being challenged – you may of just hit on the problem –

          How was your turnover before these 3 …

        • #2704165

          You may of hit it – Stressful job

          by karistetzer ·

          In reply to You may of hit it – Stressful job

          SkipperUSN: I believe you hit it head on. “…but doesn’t want any stress or time requirements to do the job…”

          The turnover isn’t high at all. One staff moved to another dept in the last year and 1/2. It was just unfortunate that we have had 3 in the last month feel they needed to move on.

          I believe this will give us an opportunity to build a stronger team, who’s goals are aligned with the requirements of the positions.

          We’ve learned from the experience, and gain by that knowledge. We will continue to offer bonuses and flex time for a job well done.
          We have also learned, that we need more than one back up person to learn their jobs – to expand the other team members skills and develop them, so they will have the gained skills and experience to possibly someday move into the higher positions.

        • #2710906

          Too Much Teamwork?

          by best_john_j ·

          In reply to You may of hit it – Stressful job

          Were these three pretty close socially? If so any chance it was orchestrated? It could be that part of the reason for staying was the freindship with the others.. Hanging with the gang so to speak.. I keep thinking of the movie Office Space…

        • #2704785

          Much Ado about nothing.

          by ghandijee ·

          In reply to Somethings broke – and got to be a reason – response

          If all that you say is indeed true then I think that those that resigned were actually looking for a more cushy job more than anything else.

          Probably with the idea of greener grass on the other side.

          Just to put things in perspective, I work in IT in South Africa. My current working conditions are as follows…Work an average of 25 hours overtime a week (No overtime pay). I work the long hours not by choice but because of the work load. The development team works on an incentive scheme that is target driven, but that target has never been reached in the last four years, so no one has received an incentive in the last four years. There are no bonuses or 13th cheques, just your 12 salary cheques a year. There are no benefits like medical aid or pension fund contributions (And no, I am not a contractor, I am permanent). We worked on a project recently where we were promised a weekend away if the development was brought in by the deadline. The development was on time but the technical team lagged behind, the result was no weekend away for the development team. The stress levels are way too high and the expectation level as well. I am now currently looking for something else because I have been doing this for four and a half years to gain experience & now just feel that I deserve better than to be be exploited this way.

          So, what your employees had sounds good. You can’t please all of the people all of the time & no one is indispensible.

          The grass always seems greener on the other side, so chin up and persevere. You will find employees that will appreciate what you do for them.

      • #2704747

        It could be a “blip”

        by cmb from omaha ·

        In reply to Somethings broke – and got to be a reason – did you do an exit interview

        I agree that any organization should do some serious soul-searching about why their people might leave–and on a continuing basis, not just after they start losing lots of talent.

        OTOH, this could just be a statistical “blip”. Sometimes things just happen in “clusters” without having a common cause.

      • #2710853

        Exit interviews are less than worthless

        by the chad ·

        In reply to Somethings broke – and got to be a reason – did you do an exit interview

        You are correct in that someone needs to find out what is wrong. Exit interviews are the wrong time, wrong person and wrong place to do this.

        A smart employee knows better than to say ANYTHING in an exit interview. This is, unfortunately, something that can only truely be learned via personal experience.

        A smart employer knows better than to find out what is wrong with the company after the employee has given up on it (and also see the previous paragraph).

        A smart employer will regularly (i.e., continuously, forever, and often) talk to the employees and ask one simple question (your choice of how to phrase it):

        “How can I help you do your job to the best of your ability?”

        Money has nothing to do with this, and you figured this out when you offered your ex-emps money. It may be a loud office, constant interruptions, micromanaging boss; whatever.

        A smart employer will not only ask the question, but DO SOMETHING PROACTIVE ABOUT IT.

        • #2721577

          Agreed!

          by bfilmfan ·

          In reply to Exit interviews are less than worthless

          I think Nick from Ask the Headhunter put it best when he said that if you want to keep your staff ask them the questions on the exit interview every 6 months or so.

          Most management can’t ask the question on how to assist in performing a better job, since they don’t understand what it is you do in the first place.

          The system of apprenticeship to master craftsman as the “boss” understood each and every job. When management doesn’t understand the processes to develop something, be it a process, product, etc. and spend most of their time pushing paper around; issues are bound to show up. To think otherwise, is to prove yourself a true Dilbert-quality of management.

      • #2710801

        Change over and shortage

        by ray ·

        In reply to Somethings broke – and got to be a reason – did you do an exit interview

        Read the original request. Karistetzer doesn?t really want to discuss WHY they left. He was asking how to deal with the immediate situation – change over and shortage.

        You may have to spend money to fix this problem.

        1. Do the best you can to have those leaving thoroughly document their processes.
        2. Hire 90 day temps just to get over the hump.
        3. Do what many others have suggested and hire the right people to prevent future problems. In short, be creative, think outside the box.

        Consider developing a critical skills matrix. This is not a fool proof tool but might help mitigate future problems. List each employee on the side and critical skills/tasks across the top. Then, look at the matrix and see where you only have one person trained on tasks. It may help to rank each person on a 0-5 scale for each task. You?ll want to cross train others to support the primary and prevent an ?all eggs in one basket? situation.

    • #2704795

      Keeping them on board

      by rdulay ·

      In reply to Handling Multiple Staff Resignations in a month

      If they’re determined to leave, not much you can do. In our part of the world,we do the following to keep our people:
      1.) Pay them well.
      2.) Keep them busy with challenging assignments/projects.
      Ronnie A. Dulay
      Philippines

    • #2704793

      Coincidence?

      by gyrfalcon888 ·

      In reply to Handling Multiple Staff Resignations in a month

      I suspect that it you look you will see aomething that happened within the organization in the last 3 to 6 months that may explain the “sudden” loss of staff. It might have been as simple as a management change or as complex as a direction or moral shift by the organization. I don’t believe in coincidence.

    • #2704789

      Does your company have a retention strategy in place?

      by msizak ·

      In reply to Handling Multiple Staff Resignations in a month

      Most employees are concern with their career in the work place today. Some of us we need a clear career path so that we could be motivated by it.

    • #2704784

      Could be a lot of reasons !

      by j.g.camp ·

      In reply to Handling Multiple Staff Resignations in a month

      I wouldn’t rule out the boss. There are pay, benefits, hours worked, the team wasn’t a team. Maybe they got a job closer to home (less commute). Without the candor of an honest exit interview and when you leave your better off not giving anyone any more ammo than they need to feel bitter about being jilted.

      I worked for a company and I was the third to resign and leave. But that was definitely a case of the man we had to work for. The only guy that stayed, he transferred down from Ohio. The boss lost the VP of Operations sweepstakes and they folded this bitter jerk in as our boss. He wound up even driving the only guy that would put up with him to the hospital for 3 1/2 days with stress related chest pains.

      At any rate, 3 job openings, deal with it ! Any chance these people decided to change industries with all the outsourcing of tech industry. There are easier ways of making the same money without having to pace all the software and hardware changes technology puts you thru.

    • #2704783

      Signs of DENIAL: “It had nothing to do with their management”???

      by pmaina2000 ·

      In reply to Handling Multiple Staff Resignations in a month

      A mass exit has EVERYTHING to do with management. Such a statement gives me an idea of the kind of management style adopted in your company:

      “See no evil, Hear no evil, Speal more evil”

      WAKE UP!

      • #2704751

        Been There, Done That.

        by fgi57 ·

        In reply to Signs of DENIAL: “It had nothing to do with their management”???

        I was employed by a company that had a significant turnover rate. I was not aware of this prior to being hired, but very soon found out why. The company had a manager that was out of control. The President of the company did nothing to rectify this managers rampages because this manager had recently been made Vice President of the company because he knew more about the product then the President. The President tried to explain the managers actions in a company staff meeting as “being passionate about the product”. We were very hard workers and spent many hours working without being paid for it because we also had a passion for the product and loyalty to the comapny and the President, but not at the costs of being abused which ultimately caused the staff to feel very uncomfortable and leave. I was later told that not long before I was hired this same manager had fired everyone except the Office manager. I was told that this was a small company struggling to get off the ground, which I later found out was a lie. The company had been sued because this manager went before a client and performed very badly, throwing things and the like. No person should have to go through this to be employed.

    • #2704772

      Wrong people for the job at hand

      by ksista ·

      In reply to Handling Multiple Staff Resignations in a month

      You may be right about the fact that it has nothing to do with management. If you are doing everything that you say you are doing, then it sounds like a great place to work for. You just had employees with entitlements, who were not suited for the job that they were in. One of the things that I learned as a manager is that every one has their strengths. We need to utilize them properly.
      To me it sounds like you had employees that were in the wrong jobs. Be happy that they have decided to leave and make sure that you recruit people that will enjoy the work. Most companies now-a-days have all prospective employees take certain tests such that they can match the employee with the Job. Also make sure that job description is very clear and the employee knows what is expected of him/her. As you know without interesting work, any incentives become entitlements.
      Good luck.

    • #2704739

      “Nothing to do with their management”??

      by john.james ·

      In reply to Handling Multiple Staff Resignations in a month

      Look again. I think the you are not admitting to the truth. Folks leave a job for three reasions:
      The job, money, or bad management. All three can be tied back to “Management”. If you are having an influx of resignations, take a strong look at “management” or lack thereof.

      • #2704728

        Reality Check

        by dutch ·

        In reply to “Nothing to do with their management”??

        I have left jobs for only a handful of reasons: Money, Career Opportunites, and to get away from BAD Managers. If what you say is true, then neither of the first two are a problem. That leaves BAD MANAGEMENT.

        None of us want to face the fact that either we have a bad manager on the team or we are one. You need to seriously think about what went on with these three people. The decision to leave is NEVER made at the time that they leave. They have been looking for another job for MONTHS. They have been pissed off and have shut up because speaking got them nothing, except more pain.

        Also, they probably lied on their exit interview. It was easier to pick that than what was really giving them problems, such as a protected employee (ex. boss’s wife).
        Even if they told the truth and those were the reasons, how was the directives handed down? The majority of people break bad management into 1 catagory…lack of respect shown to the employee from management for the job/work performed by the employee. Everyon is different, some people need more praise to get the same appreciation level.
        What else was going on in their lives? For example, a new parent will want to spent time at home caring for the new baby.

        Before you hire three new people, you must look at your department. It needs a change.

    • #2704733

      HR needs to be reviewed

      by rgun2515 ·

      In reply to Handling Multiple Staff Resignations in a month

      I would take a look at the person/people that hired the three people that left. And for your sake, I hope the person that will be conducting the interviews to replace them is not the same person. Do yourself a favor. Get more involved with the interview process. Know as much about the person as you can. Skills are important, but can be learned. Attitude is more important than any skill. Look outside the BOX for interviewing ideas. I always try to make the candidate feel as comfortable as I can. That’s how you learn about a person.

      For example.

      1. Interview in the cafeteria instead of the board room. Or take a walk on the company property if the day is nice.

      2. Make the first interview as light as you can. Don’t puch for knowledge. Find out about the person. Hobbies etc.

      3. Begin with a walk around the office. This will make them think they have the job. They will be much more open.

      Then if you like everything about them as a person, bring them back for technical interviews. And again, keep it light. Say something like “I like you but this test is just company policy. Don’t stress over it, no one aces the test.”

    • #2710940

      What’s the problem?

      by prefbid ii ·

      In reply to Handling Multiple Staff Resignations in a month

      I guess I don’t see it — what’s the problem?

      I have 46 people working for me. So far this year I have had 4 people leave (2 fired for incompetence, 1 went back to his old job for comendable personal reasons, 1 left on permanent medical). Because of corporate policy, it is very hard to replace anyone. I don’t see a problem yet. I’m still shy of 10% turnover and am likely to exceed that before the year is done.

      Three people leaving is only a problem if it is in the context of a staff of 6. If that is so, then I would say that you have a serious management problem. That management problem may have been the former management (hired the wrong people or kept incompetents around too long) or current management (not looking at the needs of the group). There is a small chance that it is a coincidence, but I would not count on it.

      As for what to do:

      1. Determine what the impact to corporate productivity is. Focus on the key functions that need shoring up.

      2. Appoint “interim” people for any key positions that you have. Consider promoting people from within to those key positions and backfilling the less crucial ones.

      2. Hire replacements as quickly as you can.

      3. Hire contractors to fill in for those positions that will impact the company if they are not immediately filled. Notice the key here is “impact the company”. Don’t hire contractors just to fill positions. There is always a knowledge transfer issue and you will be signing up for double work if you have to train a contractor and then a permanent person right on their tail.

    • #2710916

      Reply To: Handling Multiple Staff Resignations in a month

      by computer luser ·

      In reply to Handling Multiple Staff Resignations in a month

      You answered most of the “why did they leave” questions in one of your replies. All of the employees did not want to continue with their job due to one aspect or another. There doesn’t seem to be anything to figure out here, since you already know.

      However, your original question was “What recommendations can you give in handling the situation? We are now having to interview for the 3 vacancies.” Having to hire 3 new employees opens up a lot of opportunity for improvement in many areas. Don’t make the mistake of hiring quickly just to fill the workload gap. Instead, take the advice from many of the posts and try to see where you can apply this info to the new people you bring in. For example, we hired 5 new people for filling out a whole new section in our department. In our situation we were lucky, we hired a high level manager who brought in some of his own people. This brought great talent in with the ability to work together.

      In your situation, you have the burden of filling 3 positions but at the same time are in a position to use this opportunity to your advantage.

    • #2710914

      What?

      by melekali ·

      In reply to Handling Multiple Staff Resignations in a month

      You do not provide much info to go on. Two of the three were looking and found positions, so it sounds as if you knew of them beforehand. The other might have been dissatisfied, maybe felt the same as the other two without giving indications of such, or just wanted something else. Since management was not a problem, I assume the reasons for all three were personal, i.e., wanted more money, wanted to perform different functions, wanted a different work environment, didn’t like coworkers, personality conflicts or differences, etc.

      Considering this and not knowing exactly what the jobs of these positions are, I would recommend making the job description actually match the duties of the jobs and ensuring that the new hirees want to do the work you are hiring them for at the pay rate you are willing to pay them. This goes to the hiring process. The interviewer should probably be the person who will be the new hires boss since personality matters. I would recommend hiring not based solely on technical prowess, but on the right mix. Personally, I’d much rather have someone less technically competent who was obviously smart enough to learn with a pleasant demeanor than a technical expert with a terrible attitude, including thinking he or she was God’s gift to the universe.

      Unless you are hiring a programmer to lock away and create magic, personality matters, and taking care of the people you hire matters. Company values and attitudes need to foster a desire to work at your company.

    • #2710797

      UUUUUUUhh, hire some more?

      by virtualgardener ·

      In reply to Handling Multiple Staff Resignations in a month

      If they left for their own reasons, which i am finding it hard to believe, what exactly is the problem? There are plenty of Technical temp agencies out there that could send you some temporary employees to fill the gap. You might even consider this as an option for locating permanent replacements since you get to see them in action before making a decision. I am still failing to see what your question is.

    • #2710699

      It may be the economy

      by taggat ·

      In reply to Handling Multiple Staff Resignations in a month

      Most of the current responses deal with my first comment. There are common motivators and “de-motivators” in IT jobs – covered very well in two books (don’t have the full titles with me but they start with):

      Leading Geeks (see http://www.leadinggeeks.com)
      Managing Einsteins

      In these books, it is pointed out that Knowledge worker (IT type) talent tends to be more mobile than other professionals. Someone in your organization may have ticked them off by unknowingly disrepecting their interests as well as their skills. It is not enough to take your Einsteins out for a meal periodically, you sincerely have to value their contribution and make certain that working conditions do not harshly conflict with their sometimes unique personalities and working styles – as much as possible within your organizational framework.

      You said one employee did not like a position that demanded high quality all the time – that is what I am talking about. You might have tried shuffling positions so that this person would not have this “high expectation of perfection” on a daily basis. You need a perfectionist for this position. Obviously this person was not a perfectionist. You needed to adjust the work assignments accordingly, to avoid the inevitable.

      Despite everything, sometimes people leave. They want a change, more money, more security, less of something that bugs them. Not much you can do for some of these things. For others you need to keep the lines of communication open so you can spot the trends in conversation that signal a growing need for change, money, position, etc.

      I just recently changed jobs, and the timing had nothing to do with the desire to leave (that had been decided several years back), but rather a recovery of the number of available jobs for decent money in the tech sector. During the past several years, finding a new It job in my geographic area has been next to impossible. Your people may have been primed to leave for some time, but the lack-luster economy may have kept them around longer than planned.

    • #2710598

      Someone knows why they left

      by eelder1 ·

      In reply to Handling Multiple Staff Resignations in a month

      Good companies require exit interviews when people leave. Why don’t you talk to your HR manager. My guess would be salaries are low in the department or a unpopular manager is involved. This sort of thing happens all the time when a company doens’t have a competitive salary or poor working conditions exist.

    • #2709794

      Change Breeds Opportunity

      by socal_it_director ·

      In reply to Handling Multiple Staff Resignations in a month

      Most of the replies already given address a lot of things to consider. My few cents for consideration:

      (1) Avoid Speculation

      Bad things can and do happen. Interview both the exiting group and the current staff. Get a better understanding of anything that might be broke, then start a plan to fix it. Keep your existing staff “in the loop”.

      (2) Look Again for Hidden Talent

      Some of your existing staff may have promotion potential, if not management potnential. Delegate new tasks and watch how they respond. Give them an opportunity to manage a new process, lead a group, become responsible for something greater.

      (3) Define the Gap

      What gaps exist with the exiting people? Do you really need 3 replacements to do the job? Were they effective/efficient to begin with? What exactly did they support, and do you need more or less people to do it?

      (4) Identify Solutions to Fill the Gap

      First, fill the gap. Do you work your existing staff overtime until the other positions are filled? Do you bring in temp/contractors in the meantime? etc., etc… It’ll be easy to cause your existing staff to burnout if you don’t offer some relief. Filling 3 spots can take awhile. This may also be an opportunity for one of your staff to supervise a contractor, giving you more feedback on their capabilities. Identify your “ideal/preferred” and “next best” approach to managing the gap.

      (5) Secure Resources

      Go back to your management, if necessary, to get the resources you need for an approach identified in #4, above. You may be surprised to get waht you ask for. You may also get shut down and forced to work with what you’ve got. In either event, you need to show that you’ve got the situation in hand and are not afraid to say you’ve got difficult times facing you.

      (6) Take the Time to Find the “Right” People

      As some other responses have indicated, don’t fill to get a body in, fill it with someone that’ll be a good “fit”. Perhaps a headhunter placement agency could be of assistance (if so, identify it too in #4), maybe you’ll have to search a little longer, whatever. Give yourself the time (again, resources in #4) and pad it a little to find the right people.

    • #2709742

      From what you’ve described,

      by dc_guy ·

      In reply to Handling Multiple Staff Resignations in a month

      It sounds like at least one of them was no great loss, possibly two. People who can’t get along with “the system” will eventually be more trouble than they’re worth. People who can find something wrong with the job you’re describing are a little too hard to please. Of course we’re just taking your word for the fact that you’re the world’s kindest and fairest supervisor, but even if you weren’t those are still some darn good jobs. I doubt that you’ll have much trouble filling them with good people who will be happy to have them, in this economy.

    • #2720669

      yeah, riiight…

      by lioninoil ·

      In reply to Handling Multiple Staff Resignations in a month

      “It had nothing to do with their management.”

      … where have I heard that before?? Oh, yeah, now I remember: it was from A BAD MANAGER.

    • #2707968

      IT Nightmare!

      by rvarughese2000 ·

      In reply to Handling Multiple Staff Resignations in a month

      What you describe is every manager’s nightmare. A month after I joined my company four people, who worked for another manager, resigned in the same week. However, in the end it did affect me since, I had to share my staff with the other manager. Bottom line in this case was the treatment of staff by the manager, he used to micro manage their time.

      I personally try to rotate my staff i.e. if one of them has worked in the Finance area on atleast two projects, he/she will be assigned a marketing project next. It reduces my risk if one of them should walk out the door, increases knowledge, keeps the staff interested and from a support point of view they are all capable. It is hard if one area does not have that many projects. If this is the case, I start assigning support tickets from that area to a staff that has not been in that area for quite sometime.

    • #2722099

      have you considered consultants or outsourcing?

      by pjnyusa ·

      In reply to Handling Multiple Staff Resignations in a month

      What was their function? It might make more sense to outsource or hire a consultant.

    • #2706234

      Also, don’t forget to take care of the rest

      by comgrit ·

      In reply to Handling Multiple Staff Resignations in a month

      Besides the exit interview that need to be performed to findout exactly why they left, you also have to take care of the rest of your staff.

      When several people left the company, there will be moral crisis for the rest. Rumors, corridors chat, etc, etc.

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