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Hard ware and Net working

By rajankanth ·
HAY,

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN LAN and WAN?
AT What SITUATIONS THESE R USEFULL?

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Hard ware and Net working

by rajankanth In reply to Hard ware and Net working

WHAT IS MEANT BY A CLIENT? GIVE WITH A SITUAION SO THAT I CAN UNDERSTAND BETTER?
iS IT EQUAL TO USER ?OF A PC??

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Hard ware and Net working

by rajankanth In reply to Hard ware and Net working

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN BOOT AND REEBOOT?

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Technically nothing - it is just a matter of the situation

by Deadly Ernest In reply to Hard ware and Net working

You boot a system when you first turn it on.

Technically, when you tell your system to close down and start again, this is known as a restart - some people call this a reboot. but since you're doing a proper close down this is really known as a restart.

A reboot is when you restart the hardware without doing a software close down first, usually done when the system has locked up. You lean down and press the button on the PC labelled Reset, it's the small one like the start button but only a quarter of the start button's size (usually). Can also be done by turning off the power, and then turning it back on.

You must be careful when doing a reboot like this as it can often trash the operating system if it hasn't already been trashed by the freeze. From my experiences, it will only trash the system if the system was ready to be trashed anyway.


edit to turn of to off

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Boy do you need to buy and read that text book.

by Deadly Ernest In reply to Hard ware and Net working

A PC is just that a computer - no more, no less. End of story. You can use that PC for many things, doing assignments, playing games, surfing the Internet, collecting the largest single collection of trojans and virus infections in the know world.

Some of the things you can use a PC for are to:

1. Have it provide services to another PC, via a domain network or a Peer to Peer network. In such a case when it provides those services to the other computer it is a server as it is serving the other computer.

2. When you use your PC to get a service from another computer your PC is a client that is serviced by the other computer.

Example PC Fred is connected to the Internet, and shares that connection (via Internet Connection Sharing) with his dorm mates PC Harry, PC Tom, and PC **** - Note, this is a typical Peer to Peer network situation. For the use of the Internet, Fred is the Internet server while the others are Internet clients.

Now **** is a nice guy and has a huge collection of music, so he shares that folder and allows the others to listen to it. PC **** is a music server and the others are music clients. Likewise Harry shares his database of assignment notes, etc.

In each case the server PC has to be set up to allow the client PCs to have access, and that is another lesson as the process varies between operating systems and network set ups.

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I suppose you mean a LAN and WAN

by Deadly Ernest In reply to Hard ware and Net working

LAN Local Area Network, what is within the area that you describe as local - usually seen as one physical location or part of a physical location (a lot depends on the size of the physical location).

WAN Wide Area Network is a whole bunch of LANs that are part of a bigger organisation.

One place I worked at, a military base spread out over a few square kilometres (think miles if that's easier for your) with a number of buildings and different units on it. Each unit in a building had a LAN, often this was the whole building, sometimes two LANs in the building. Each of the buildings were connected, via routers, to the rest of the base network. the base wide network was the WAN, as it covered the Wider Area.

Go to my website www.bywater.net.au and move to the page on networking, there you will see a network diagram that I drew up some years ago, click on it to expand it. The whole network is a complex WAN with an Internet gateway. Each sub unit with an underlined title is a LAN, some are part of a WAN that are part of a larger WAN. The LANs Millicent, Penola, Naracoorte, Hamilton are all LANs that make up part of the WAN called Mt Gambier, this is also part of a larger WAN called Australia Green. Each network is connected to the others by a router, except Canberra as it's a second LAN within the same building and separated as a logical LAN on the same cable and router.

This diagram will show you the answer to a lot of your questions as it shows the various servers in each LAN. The numbers by each name is the number of client PCs in that LAN. This even shows how you can segregate the LANs by their IP numbers.

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