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Home Directory Privileges

By cal.williams ·
I inherited responsibility for a Win 2000 Server and found that no user home directories were assigned. I assigned home directories in the user profiles, and the mapped drive does now appear in the user's My Computer. But the mapped drive icon cannot be opened - the message says the user has insufficient privileges. Yet, all privileges to the directory are assigned to the user at the server. What am I missing here?

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Home Directory Privileges

by Curious_George In reply to Home Directory Privileges

Did you remember to set share level permissions in addition to the NTFS perms on the directories?

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Home Directory Privileges

by cal.williams In reply to Home Directory Privileges

Users have all privileges set in both the sharing and security tabs for the home directory.

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Home Directory Privileges

by cal.williams In reply to Home Directory Privileges

Point value changed by question poster.

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Home Directory Privileges

by JackSanders In reply to Home Directory Privileges

I've had problems with our Windows 2000 Servers by creating the Home directory and user space before entering in the path in Active Directory Users and Computers. My solution for that situation was to let Active Directory create the Home folder path for me:

First try creating a temp/test user. Open Properties on the test user whom you want to create a Home directory for using Active Directory Users & Computers. Go to the Profile tab and use \\comp_name\homepath\%username%

(of course, change comp_name and homepath to match your own) Keeping %username% , as typed, is the key - this will let Active Directory create the user Home folder and assign the default permissions for you. Later you can break the permissions inheritance and add your own, such as Administrator access.

May not be what you're experiencing, but allowing AD to create the folders solved my own "permission denied" problems.

Good luck!

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Home Directory Privileges

by cal.williams In reply to Home Directory Privileges

I was quite sure I had tried this, but after reading your well-written answer I went over and tried it again. Unfortunately, no, sorry to say this still does not work. I must have walked into a little trap here, because apparently the previous (and long-gone) support guy, who installed this server, was never able to to get it to work either.

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Home Directory Privileges

by Gigelul In reply to Home Directory Privileges

Also check the share-mapped drive-for permisssion (parent folder).

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Home Directory Privileges

by cal.williams In reply to Home Directory Privileges

Sorry, I added a comment above instead of here where it should be. If you have any further thoughts, please answer again. I do think that inheritance could be involved here, but don't see how to decipher it other than what I see as privleges on the resulting folder, which are full for both administrator and user (and then ignored by the workstation.)

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Home Directory Privileges

by cal.williams In reply to Home Directory Privileges

This may be the interesting part. The parent directory is "shared for adminstrative purposes" and I cannot see or modify the permissions. So, I can't tell or control what permissions the home directory is inheriting. Either something is wrong here or I am (again) missing something obvious.

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Home Directory Privileges

by cal.williams In reply to Home Directory Privileges

Point value changed (again) by question poster. Really need some help here...

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Home Directory Privileges

by JackSanders In reply to Home Directory Privileges

I assume your Win2000 Server is NTFS formatted. The "shared for adminstrative purposes" appears in Win2000 default-mapped shares, such as the C$ default hidden share. I would suggest, for now, abandoning the existing home directory and creating another to test on.

Try creating a new home folder, say c:\tempdir, and share it with default permissions (Everyone group, full control). Go to AD, create a test user, and assign drive X (for example) to \\comp_name\tempdir\%username% and see if you can't login as the test user and use the new X: drive.

If you can, then there is a problem with the existing home directory. The good news is, if no one was able to use it, you can easily abandon and remove it.

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