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How can i fix my computer, Please Help

By nolanspot ·
About a month a go when my computer would start up, and the screen would be blank after the hp screen would come up, i would hit f1 on the blank screen to start the windows xp screen where it took about 5 minutes then finally loaded.. about 3 weeks ago after i started my compiter, i got a message after i hit f1 that said my windows\system32\config was corrput or missing.. so it wouldnt boot up, after about a week i started it back up and i got a message saying my windows/system32/ drivers/ isapnp.sys was missing or corrupt. so i put in my xp cd to try and repair it from the recovery console.. and i cant do anythign cause access is denied whenever i try and do anything.. and it doesnt ask me for an admin password.. so idk how i can repair it.. i then tryed to boot my computer up today.. and it didnt say anything was corrupt or missing, after i hit f1 on the blank screen, it would go to a choice of whether to boot normal, boot from last know good configuration, or boot in safemode, i tryed all the selections.. and it just shows the windoes xp screen, then restarts, and its a never ending process .. it just restarts. is there anyway to repair this problem, or do i have to format it and start from scratch?? any advice would be appreciated

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Try this repair install for your issue..

Repair Install
If XP is corrupted to the point where none of the previous solutions get it to boot,
you can do a Repair Install that might work as well as keep the current settings.
Make sure you have your valid WindowsXP key.
The whole process takes about half an hour depending on your computer
If you are being prompted for the administrator's password, you need to choose the 2nd repair option, not the first.
1.Insert and boot from your WindowsXP CD
2.At the second R=Repair option, press the R key
3.This will start the repair
4.Press F8 for I Agree at the Licensing Agreement
5.Press R when the directory where WindowsXP is installed is shown. Typically this is C:\WINDOWS
6.It will then check the C: drive and start copying files
7.It will automatically reboot when needed. Keep the CD in the drive.
8.You will then see the graphic part of the repair that is like during a normal install of XP (Collecting Information, Dynamic Update, Preparing Installation, Installing Windows, Finalizing Installation)
9.When prompted, click on the Next button
10.When prompted, enter your XP key
11.Normally you will want to keep the same Workgroup or Domain name
12.The computer will reboot
13.Then you will have the same screens as a normal XP Install
14.Activate if you want (usually a good idea)
15.Register if you want (but not necessary)
16.Finish
17.At this point you should be able to log in with any existing accounts.

Please post back if you have any more problems or questions.
If this information is useful, please mark as helpful. Thanks.

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Unfortunately because you have a HP Recovery Disc

by OH Smeg In reply to Try this repair install f ...

This isn't an option for you. As you have backed up everything insert the Recovery Disc into the Optical Drive and reboot the system. When you see the message that reads Press Any Key To Boot From CD Press any key on the keyboard and allow the Recovery CD to do it's job.

if you do not see this message you need to enter BIOS and change the Boot Order to First Boot Device as the Floppy if you have one, the second Boot Device is the Optical Drive and the third Boot Device is the HDD. Naturally if you do not have a floppy disregard this and set the Optical Drive to the First Boot Device and the HDD to the Second Boot Device. Save the changes on Exit and allow the system to restart then follow the same directions.

After the HDD has been formatted and reloaded copy all of you Data Across to the computer from your Backup. Just one thing here if you are using Windows Encrypted File System make sure that you have backed up your Encryption Key by following these directions.

SUMMARY
This article describes how to back up the recovery agent Encrypting File System (EFS) private key on a computer that is running Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Microsoft Windows 2000, or Microsoft Windows XP. Use the recovery agent's private key to recover data in situations when the copy of the EFS private key that is located on the local computer is lost. This article contains information about how to use the Certificate Export Wizard to export the recover agent's private key from a computer that is a member of a workgroup, and from a Windows Server 2003-based or Windows 2000-based domain controller.
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INTRODUCTION
This article describes how to back up the recovery agent Encrypting File System (EFS) private key in Windows Server 2003, in Windows 2000, and in Windows XP. You can use the recovery agent's private key to recover data in situations when the copy of the EFS private key that is located on the local computer is lost.

You can use EFS to encrypt data files to prevent unauthorized access. EFS uses an encryption key that is dynamically generated to encrypt the file. The File Encryption Key (FEK) is encrypted with the EFS public key and is added to the file as an EFS attribute that is named Data Decryption Field (DDF). To decrypt the FEK, you must have the corresponding EFS private key from the public-private key pair. After you decrypt the FEK, you can use the FEK to decrypt the file.

If your EFS private key is lost, you can use a recovery agent to recover encrypted files. Every time that a file is encrypted, the FEK is also encrypted with the Recovery Agent's public key. The encrypted FEK is attached to the file with the copy that is encrypted with your EFS public key in the Data Recovery Field (DRF). If you use the recovery agent's private key, you can decrypt the FEK, and then decrypt the file.

By default, if a computer that is running Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional is a member of a workgroup or is a member of a Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 domain, the local administrator who first logs on to the computer is designated as the default recovery agent. By default, if a computer that is running Windows XP or Windows 2000 is a member of a Windows Server 2003 domain or a Windows 2000 domain, the built-in Administrator account on the first domain controller in the domain is designated as the default recovery agent.

Note that a computer that is running Windows XP and that is a member of a workgroup does not have a default recovery agent. You have to manually create a local recovery agent. For more information, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
255026 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/255026/) The local administrator is not always the default Encrypting File System recovery agent


Important After you export the private key to a floppy disk or other removable media , store the floppy disk or media in a secure location. If someone gains access to your EFS private key, that person can gain access to your encrypted data.


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Export the recovery agent?s private key from a computer that is a member of a workgroup
To export the recovery agent?s private key from a computer that is a member of a workgroup, follow these steps: 1. Log on to the computer by using the recovery agent?s local user account.
2. Click Start, click Run, type mmc, and then click OK.
3. On the File menu, click Add/Remove Snap-in, and then click Add.
4. Under Available Standalone Snap-ins, click Certificates, and then click Add.
5. Click My user account, and then click Finish.
6. Click Close, and then click OK.
7. Double-click Certificates - Current User, double-click Personal, and then double-click Certificates.
8. Locate the certificate that displays the words "File Recovery" (without the quotation marks) in the Intended Purposes column.
9. Right-click the certificate that you located in step 8, point to All Tasks, and then click Export. The Certificate Export Wizard starts.
10. Click Next.
11. Click Yes, export the private key, and then click Next.
12. Click Personal Information Exchange ? PKCS #12 (.PFX).

Note We strongly recommend that you also click to select the Enable strong protection (requires IE 5.0, NT 4.0 SP4 or above check box to protect your private key from unauthorized access.

If you click to select the Delete the private key if the export is successful check box, the private key is removed from the computer and you will not be able to decrypt any encrypted files.
13. Click Next.
14. Specify a password, and then click Next.
15. Specify a file name and location where you want to export the certificate and the private key, and then click Next.

Note We recommend that you back up the file to a disk or to a removable media device, and then store the backup in a location where you can confirm the physical security of the backup.
16. Verify the settings that are displayed on the Completing the Certificate Export Wizard page, and then click Finish.

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Export the domain recovery agent's private key
The first domain controller in a domain contains the built-in Administrator profile that contains the public certificate and the private key for the default recovery agent of the domain. The public certificate is imported to the Default Domain Policy and is applied to domain clients by using Group Policy. If the Administrator profile or if the first domain controller is no longer available, the private key that is used to decrypt the encrypted files is lost, and files cannot be recovered through that recovery agent.

To locate the Encrypted Data Recovery policy, open the Default Domain Policy in the Group Policy Object Editor snap-in, expand Computer Configuration, expand Windows Settings, expand Security Settings, and then expand Public Key Policies.

To export the domain recovery agent's private key, follow these steps: 1. Locate the first domain controler that was promoted in the domain.
2. Log on to the domain controller by using the built-in Administrator account.
3. Click Start, click Run, type mmc, and then click OK.
4. On the File menu, click Add/Remove Snap-in, and then click Add.
5. Under Available Standalone Snap-ins, click Certificates, and then click Add.
6. Click My user account, and then click Finish.
7. Click Close, and then click OK.
8. Double-click Certificates - Current User, double-click Personal, and then double-click Certificates.
9. Locate the certificate that displays the words "File Recovery" (without the quotation marks) in the Intended Purposes column.
10. Right-click the certificate that you located in step 9, point to All Tasks, and then click Export. The Certificate Export Wizard starts.
11. Click Next.
12. Click Yes, export the private key, and then click Next.
13. Click Personal Information Exchange ? PKCS #12 (.PFX).

Note We strongly recommend that you click to select the Enable strong protection (requires IE 5.0, NT 4.0 SP4 or abovecheck box to protect your private key from unauthorized access.

If you click to select the Delete the private key if the export is successful check box, the private key is removed from the domain controller. As a best practice, we recommend that you use this option. Install the recovery agent's private key only in situations when you need it to recover files. At all other times, export, and then store the recovery agent's private key offline to help maintain its security.
14. Click Next.
15. Specify a password, and then click Next.
16. Specify a file name and location where you want to export the certificate and the private key, and then click Next.

Note We recommend that you back up the file to a disk or to a removable media device, and then store the backup in a location where you can confirm the physical security of the backup.
17. Verify the settings that are displayed on the Completing the Certificate Export Wizard page, and then click Finish.


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