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How can I project server life ?

By Andrew Cooke ·
Hi.

I have never posted here before, normally because someone has asked the question before and been given an answer.

This time I don't know what to search for !!


I have a large computer room containing all compaq servers covering everything you could imagine from F/P to application servers.

We now are paying quite a lot to cover these servers as they are over 3 years old. I have been tasked with:

1) Identify how old the server is.
2) Identify how much in maintanance its costing.
3) Project its lifespan. for example disk space requirements.

I then need to create a server refresh timeline of when I expect its costing us too much money vs buying a new server with warranty.

Does anyone know what this process is called ?
Can anyone point me in the right direction

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Andrew well actually over here Servers are

by HAL 9000 Moderator In reply to How can I project server ...

Not so much replaced because they no longer perform as required, require too much maintance or constant upgrading to fitt the ever increasing needs of a business they are replaced purelly for taxation reasons.

Currently we depreacate all computer equipment 30% per year and when a server or any computer equipment gets down to a value that is detirmed by the accounting department as no longer being cost effective for taxation purposes they are replaced. Every server that I have pulled off line and replaced was working perfectly and in all probability would continue to do so for a very long time to come and with the exception of things like ISA Servers all our production Servers are multi processor units with inbuilt SCSI so they are upgradable for a very long time I would imange it all depends on what you term as a server.
The servers that I work with are run 24/7/356 and very rearly cause any problems other than self induced ones but they basicly run all the time with proper protection builtin ad we only go aff line when something like the Slammer Worm or something similar creats a DoS which incidently didn't affect us. Of course we routinely pull a server for maintance but we run a redunt sustem where I work so one going off line for a few hours doesn't present much of a problem if any and we never pull a server durring peek ussage times.

As a guide if you have good servers warranty isn't an issue with us and just look at what your accounting department has devalued these units to and use that as a guide as to when they need replacing. You are in a better position that anyone else here to know what exactly you have but all the application servers should have as a bare minuinum a Dual Process M'Board at least 1 GIG of RAM and two SCSI channels that can handle up to fifteen devices per channel to support all your required drives and give you room to grow as required.
If the things are constantly failing you have a very basic problem as these units wern't fit for the job that they where bought for originally or lack the proper protection devices these are both hardware and software. Although you will never have a totally secure system that is invunerable to attack it should at the very least be somewhat secure and here is something very important a lot of problems arrise when staff are allowed to access the network from home as their home computers don't have the necessary security procedures installed so this could be a source of your problems as we now not only secure the network but also every persons home computer who has the authority to access the network and while at first it proves expensive in the long run it saves a heap of problems. Particuarly with CEO's and Board Members but every home computer that has access to our network is not only secured at their residence but we also perform any repair work required just to keep our network secure and not allow any other unorthirised person access to a means of accessing our network. This used to be our buggest problem some CEO would take their computer in for repair and then that would give the repaired or one of their staff the means to access our systems with all the privilages of the nominated user. We only picked this one up when one of the Board Members was accessing the network while in hospital in a coma so we knew it wasn't him so we locked the whole system down and when we backtracked we found that his computer had been taken in for repair and his HDD replaced or cloned and all his access priviliges had been stolen buy someone else, we never found out who but now we perform every repiar job imangiable from changing a LT battery to decomissioning computers.

If you want any more details feel free to e-mail me direct.

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by Andrew Cooke In reply to Andrew well actually over ...

WOW !! 690 words in a reply

Thanks for your help Col, you are correct in that our accouting department has a lot to the problem in hand.

I will let you know how I get on, and maybe I'll write an article on how I got on. If nothing else to get some feedback from others.

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Glad that I could offer some Help

by HAL 9000 Moderator In reply to

Actually I would like to know how you get on just out of courisitory as this is something that I've seen often enough in a lot of small companies and it will only get worse with Microsoft's Current push of "DO More With Less" but at the same time Intel is suggesting that if you have any computers over 3 years old you should replace them as they are costing you money in being too slow.
The one common thing however is that the IT sections are being asked to perform more with less money so all the equipment has to last longer. Actually I'm glad it's not me in your position. But if I can be of any assistance please fee free to e-mail me personally I'd be glad to try to help.

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