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How do i setup a large area wireless access with more than 2 wl routers?

By mike ·
I am trying to install wireless access for a college dorn. There are 3 floors plus a basement. I have a wireless router on each floor.
Linksys (2) and Tp Link (2).
The basement Linksys is connected to the cable modem and a cat5 cable goes to the linksys on the ground level. From there I have cables going from the floor level to each of the other floors to the TP Links routers.
I can see the routers on each floor but they do not have internet all the time.
What do I need to do to make this work?

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this seems to be a popular question, have your tried this

by markp24 In reply to How do i setup a large ar ...

these papers for extending the wireless networks.
http://www.hanselman.com/blog/AddingANetgearN600WirelessDualBandGigabitRouterWNDR3700ToAnExistingFIOSWirelessAPForImprovedWirelessCoverage.aspx

http://www.hanselman.com/blog/ConfiguringTwoWirelessRoutersWithOneSSIDNetworkNameAtHomeForFreeRoaming.aspx


thought that may be usefull to you


key points:

- First Router
o 192.168.1.1
o DHCP to use the range 192.168.1.3-192.168.1.254
o A wireless channel like 11
- Second Router
o 192.168.1.2
o DHCP is disabled
o Identical wireless security setup as First Router
Except the wireless Channel. Try channel 6 if the first is 11.
o Plug hard-wire into the LAN port, not the WAN port. .- Third Router
o 192.168.1.3
o DHCP is disabled
o Identical wireless security setup as First Router
Except the wireless Channel. Try channel 2 if the first is 11 and the second one is 6.
o Plug hard-wire into the LAN port, not the WAN port. .

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In effect

by robo_dev In reply to How do i setup a large ar ...

You need three Access Points, not three routers. By disabling DHCP and plugging into the LAN port on the router, it works effectively like an AP.

Since these three APs do not know about each other, they cannot support roaming, and will interfere with each other since they are in radio range of each other.

These need to be on three non-overlapping channels (e.g. 1, 6, and 11 for 802.11b)
They need to have three different network names (SSIDs).
And, as mentioned above, the router/firewall part needs to be disabled.

If a client sees two different WLANs with the same SSID, sometimes it flip-flops between them, and loses connection. While the IP address does not change, the mac-address of the packets would change in this case, and the connection gets dropped. Therefore, unless these APs are setup to talk to each other (like Cisco WLAN solution engine, or Cisco IAPP (inter-access point protocol), they should each have a different SSID. You need IAPP support for true roaming to work.

Your best solution would be to throw out the WLAN routers and buy three actual APs. These would give you IAPP, power-over-ethernet (POE), and you could manage them with SNMP software, if they've got support for it.

Cisco makes WLAN APs that do all that.

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Simple solution

by Alpha_Dog In reply to How do i setup a large ar ...

Make all the channels the same and disable any channel hopping.
Make the SSID the same on all routers.
Make the wireless security the same on all routers.
Set them up as wireless bridges on the same network.
Set up all network services (including DHCP) on the network side.
Disable all network services in the wireless routers.

End result, you should be able to Skype walking through the building.

The only gotcha is that some brands of router don't play nice with other brands. If there is an issue only between one floor and the others, suspect the odd router.

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Reponse To Answer

by robo_dev In reply to Simple solution

Ummm...having spent many years deploying enterprise WLANs....that won't work.

If the APs are all on the same channel they will interfere with each other. Client devices will randomly re-associate to one of the other APs, losing connection and/or locking up in the process. The radio signal from an AP on one floor will reach the floor above and floor below. Thus a client device on the third floor may flop between the second and third floor access point. When it flops, the authentication (WEP, WPA2, etc) has to be renewed, and the IP address is no longer valid, nor is the LAN connection since the Layer2 network changed (mac address of AP is different)). This causes the adapter to reset, typically.

The only way you can have the same SSID and have them play well together is if the APs can talk to each other (via CDP if they are Cisco) and if IAPP (Inter-Access Point Protocol) is enabled.

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