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  • #2257526

    How much time do you spend on-call?

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    by demroyer ·

    As anyone who is in IT knows, being on-call for after hours support in some way, shape, or form usually comes with the territory. But how much after hours support is reasonable to expect from IT staff? This is the hot topic around my office right now.

    My company provides a high-volume 24/7 service to the public, and due to the nature of the service we tend to be busiest at night and on week-ends (which means the majority of service-affecting problems tend to happen during those hours). Being a somewhat small company, we have a limited number of staff to contend with these outages (right now we have 3 people on the rotation). Our technicians are on-call for a week at a time, and typically log somewhere between 2 and 12 hours of off-hours support throughout the week they are on-call (4 – 6 hours is probably the average). They are compensated for this extra work by a combination of OT and comp time. This of course does not alleviate the fact that the on-call person is typically dragging the week they are on-call (especially the ones who don’t fall back asleep easily after being called at 3:00AM).

    Unfortunately, while I’d love to provide onsite 24/7 support, there isn’t enough operational work to justify having someone in the office all night to deal with the 2 or 3 support situations that may come up. What I’m wondering is whether this is a problem for other small (or even large) companies. How much time do your support technicians spend providing after hours support, and how are they compensated for this? Does the on-call responsibility ever create a morale issue? If so, how do you deal with it? I’m really curiuous about how other companies are handling this situation…

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    • #3166539

      Our typical on call

      by mjd420nova ·

      In reply to How much time do you spend on-call?

      Our on call policy is based on the regular employees doing a normal eight hour day, and the on call person begins his/her DUTY at 5PM monday until 6AM the following day, for one week, from 5PM to 6AM only. The on call person must stop in the office to pick up repair/tool kits just for those customers equipment that have to be supported 24/7. If the off going person fails to return the parts to the office on Monday, they are resonsible to provide the support until the parts are returned so the next person can take up the gauntlet. Luckily not all of our customers are willing to pay for or need 24/7 coverage.

      • #3166523

        As the only tech in my territory

        by nicknielsen ·

        In reply to Our typical on call

        I’m on call 24/7/365. Since I must respond within one hour after being called, I am very limited in what I can do and where I can go. For being available, I am compensated 2 hours pay for each non-workday on call.

        If I am called out in the evening, I am allowed to start my day late the next day. This usually results in me starting at 9 or 10 since I don’t often sleep past my normal wake-up.

        • #3199802

          As the IT deptarment of 1

          by dechevarria ·

          In reply to As the only tech in my territory

          I am on call 24/7/365. As the only the IT person in the company, I am responsible for all support calls relating to IT and Phones. Fortunately my boss is very understanding when I need to shift hours to take an unscheduled day due to my support schedule.

          However, I did work for large banking institute at one time with a large IT department and still found myself on the 24/7/365 schedule with NO compensation.

          So as you can see it depends on the company.

        • #3199663

          On call

          by thomascruff ·

          In reply to As the IT deptarment of 1

          I recently worked for a large shop that required on-call. They had a primary/backup type setup and a call escalation tree.

          However, when the call got escalated to 1st level management, he/she would just go through the numbers in his cell phone until he found someone, on call or not. Even those on vacation were subject to calls if the primary/backup did not answer or could not solve the problem.

          They did not compensate for on-call, nor did the off-hour calls excuse you from the 45 hours (8-5)you were supposed to be in the office every week.

          This company even charged the people who were issued phones $15 a month for any personal calls they might make on the company cell phone.

          Needless to say, I have moved on to a better environment.

      • #3199704

        It’s a little different in the mainframe world

        by oldmainframer ·

        In reply to Our typical on call

        …but some of the issues still apply.

        At the current company, one person is designated on-call for the week. Some things come up during the normal 8-5 workday and some things come up during the overnight hours. The on-call person is expected to be the primary point of contact, but sometimes, one of the other team members has a better perspective or experience to solve the problem. We have no problem supporting each other in this regared.

        On-call here has always been kind of quiet. Compensated? No. But, it’s not too bad.

        One former company was a nighmare, but that would take a book to explain how bad it was….

        An earlier company, we had enough staff to handle the evening hours ONE day per month. At that time, we were expected to come in at 5 pm and stay until the cycles were all more or less done (say 3-5 AM). Compensation was that if you stayed “too long”, you were not expected in the next day. Since we all worked 45-50 hours/week anyway, I’d have to say, we were not compensated…

    • #3199693

      We faced a similar issue

      by rclark2 ·

      In reply to How much time do you spend on-call?

      We are a 24/7/365 regional hospital. All of our staff is subject to call in different ways. Like you we started with a weekly call schedule. Every one except the analysts had to take the beeper, cell phone and laptop home. That lasted until they were getting two or three calls a night.

      We finally went to 24/5 coverage. During the week, we have three shifts; days, evenings and nights. In order to get these positions productive, we have moved most of the computer setup and reformat to second and third shifts. They are also responsible for calling the analysts when something goes wrong and implementing the solution set for the problems.

      What this does is to relieve the normal day shift from most of the weekday after hours support.

      Then everyone only has to worry about call on weekends.

      The analysts are on call 24/7, but they have hands on the other end of the phone to help fix the problem so it doesn’t take so long. This way, the only really functional requirement is that we have to get our brain in gear at 3:00 a.m.

      Most of the time, I get called about 3 times a week somewhere around 1:00 a.m. or 4:00 a.m. That is when the end of day process starts and end, and those are critical points where problems seem to show up.

      It is not optimal, but it is working, and our people can sustain it. We have 14 support and 4 analysts for 1200 users.

      • #3199631

        Handled with Compensation and User Training

        by kdoyle ·

        In reply to We faced a similar issue

        We are a 24/7/365 operation and have three employees for our on-call rotation; half the staff we had a little over two years ago. All are salaried ? no overtime. For each week they are on-call they receive a comp day off. We have been successful in reducing the calls received after hours by providing users information on what constitutes an emergency. See verbiage below.

        ?Calls to the after hours on-call phone should be restricted to work stoppage emergencies only. Emergencies include the inability to access XXXXX or XXXXX, the inability to login, or a power outage. Loss of email or a printer is not considered a work stoppage as phones and faxes are still available and you can print to other printers. These items will be handled the next regular business day.

        Please note: Each user receives six grace logins. If it is found that the inability to login was caused by neglect to change the password as prompted, your account will be locked. If the need to fix this results in an after hours call to the on-call phone, your supervisor will be notified as this is a fully-preventable situation.?

    • #3199619

      None – Zero, Nada, Zip.

      by dryflies ·

      In reply to How much time do you spend on-call?

      I am responsible for keeping the network up from 8-5 M-F. if it goes down on weekends or nights it is TS. I do come in on the odd saturday to make changes that would disrupt workflow during the “up” hours.

      I have had one outage during the “up” hours while we had electricity. the flash in my firewall got corrupted and I had to reload from an image I had saved. unfortunately, it had been so long since I had reloaded the image that I had to put in a TAC to do it.

      During all other network outages, we did not have lights either. Ah the sound of APC alarms in the morning. 🙂

    • #3199603

      Three Different Approaches

      by ngit ·

      In reply to How much time do you spend on-call?

      I’ve worked in three very different organizations that handled the 24/7/365 situations in very different ways.

      One organization was an ISP that simply had 24/7 support on-site, though truth be told the night shift tech and supervisor often ended up playing games and monitoring maintenance with the occasional call from a customer.

      Another organization had 6 people on the 1st line rotation and 6 people on the 2nd line rotation. The 1st line took all the calls and, if they are unable to fulfill the request due to skill or restricted access permissions, the call would be passed on to the 2nd line rotation. Not surprisingly, Help Desk folks were on the 1st line and Engineers were on the 2nd line. Carrying the pager happened in one week intervals and you were likely to be on call for a week once every month and a half. Compensation was pitiful when I started, but was eventually increased to a pretty respectable sum. Any time spent after hours was directly compensated through overtime pay, but not comp time. Fortunately, call volume wasn’t particularly high, except at the beginning of the weekends. The expectation was that calls would be picked up within 15 minutes and the duties grew and expanded to include carrying a laptop and an EVDO-enabled phone during my tenure there.

      The last organization had about 50 people on the on-call rotation. There were two tracks: primary and secondary and you only had to be on call one day at a time. The primary on-call person would receive all the calls and the secondary would only come into play if the primary doesn’t respond in a timely manner. Due to the sheer number of people on the rotation, you were basically on-call once a month. We were salaried and not given additional compensation, though being a time & materials shop, any time we spent after hours contributed to our billable hours. Calls were picked up by an answering service and the primary was expected to pick them up within 15 minutes; secondaries had 15 minutes to answer from the time they were contacted. After 30 minutes, calls were escalated to management.

      Speculating about your situation, having something workable with 3 people on the rotation might be challenging. The best things to take into it would be compassion and respect, in my opinion. Pay them a stipend for taking on the on call duties, especially since you know they’re taking multiple calls a night. If you can directly compensate with overtime, do it. If not, beef up the stipend and try to work in some comp time. If your people feel that they are being respected and their needs are being met, then the onerous duty of taking the pager won’t seem quite as bad. If they feel like their after hours efforts aren’t being appreciated, it’s very easy for the human mind to start looking for evidence for why it’s going to suck.

      While we all have a responsibility for our own attitudes toward work, it’s a lot easier when management is respectful and appreciative of the fact that our lives often get “put on hold” when we carry the pager.

      • #3283908

        Excellent feedback

        by demroyer ·

        In reply to Three Different Approaches

        Thank you for the detailed feedback and suggestions. We seem to be using a combination of the methods you described above, and are working toward implementing some of the ideas you mentioned. To provide a little further detail on our current situation:

        Our on-call rotation has 3 tiers – the first tier is made up of three hourly Help Desk Analysts who are the first point of contact for all after-hours problems. In addition, we have two (and soon to be three) System Admins who provide a second tier of support if the first tier needs to escalate a problem. As a final resort, the 2nd tier can escalate the problem to management (who either helps fix/work-around the problem, or tracks someone down who can). Since the Analysts are hourly, they are compensated via either comp time or OT (they also receive a shift differential for after hours work). The Admins, who are salaried, do not receive OT but can flex their schedules to accommodate the off-hours work.

        At this point, a strong possibility seems to be putting both Admins and Analysts on the 1st tier rotation so as to lengthen the time between being on-call from every 3 weeks to every 5 or 6 weeks (with different levels of tech management becoming the permanent 2nd and 3rd tiers). A side benefit of this is that the Admins may be able to permanently resolve some of the repetitive issues if they have to deal with them on a routine basis. The challenge in that is finding a way to equitably compensate the Admins, who are not typically eligible for OT. We’ve been playing with the stipend idea as a possible option for this.

        As for your comment about compassion & respect toward the techs who are shouldering this often burdensome responsibility, I wholeheartedly agree. The problem is that when an employee starts to burn out from a particularly bad week, showing compassion & respect begins to seem like pretty slim comfort.

        I?ll keep everyone posted on what we ultimately decide on?

        • #3283696

          Analysts are Hourly?

          by rclark2 ·

          In reply to Excellent feedback

          Wow. I didn’t know anyone paid analysts on an hourly basis. Granted that I’ve been kinda limited in the number of jobs I’ve held, still, I’ve never heard of it.

    • #3283881

      We supply outsource services and also …

      by garyr_z ·

      In reply to How much time do you spend on-call?

      support the corporate mainframes. We have two groups, Group A and Group B. Each group has 20 or
      so mainframes. We are on-call about once every 4 weeks and we do get compensated – $180 for the week. The systems are pretty stable and it is not unusual to go for the entire week without a call. That said, I had a bad wwekend a little bit ago. Conference calls at 1 am are not fun. Hardware issues on that one.

    • #3283757

      Rotation

      by bsmntcritr ·

      In reply to How much time do you spend on-call?

      In our local county government we have 5 techs in the on-call rotation. Each tech carries a cell phone for two weeks (Full pay period) and responds to each call within 30 minutes via the cell. Compensation level is $15 per day and hours are accrued if a visit is needed. Most Techs take the acrued hours as comp-time because they are valued at 1.5 times standard hours. A minimum per pay period is $210.

      Fortunately, we have a fairly stable system with a very intelligent network manger and engineer. Generally the Techs assess the problem and call whomever authored the program, if it’s in-house software, or the server god, who do can much from home. If it’s a local p/c problem, the techs has a wide latitude to swipe another p/c, printer, etc, if the kaput unit is critical.

      • #3283698

        Swiping Parts, Pieces and Machines

        by rclark2 ·

        In reply to Rotation

        We have that also. Our IS shop keeps a few spares, but the IS techs usually scrounge parts from the systems of the IS staff. Don’t know the number of times that I’ve come in and my printer was gone. Our systems are usually more up to date and more powerful that what is in the field, so they are targets of opportunity for replacing a slow/malfunctioning/outdated system that is causing problems.

    • #3282310

      Compensation comes in many forms

      by hydrus187 ·

      In reply to How much time do you spend on-call?

      Every technical career involves many long hours with projects, support, disaster recovery, to name just a few activities. Once you are in this industry long enough, you realize there are unfair situations whether placed upon you intentionally or not. As a support person, you may put in 100 hours more per year than those in the department with less seniority. As this person, you may have a wife and kids while the other people with less seniority are single and possibly younger or older, with less or more experience. One day you realize the reason you are putting in more hours is because in a glitch, when systems are down and the company is loosing money, the only person your boss and VP want close to the problem is you! So it is a mixed blessing that you are paying dearly for.
      (It is also correctlable when this person realizes she/he is better off sharing knowledge with others [teamwork] rather than hording it sacrificing her/his life and gaining spotlight when management may see through him as well.)

      Where am I going with this? These on-call periods don’t last forever. Jobs change, lay-offs happen, people get promoted. In the example above, the 100+ more hour person grins and bears it for a year without complaint and may benefit through more responsibilty resulting in hire pay or promotion. Or, with an unexpected, unannounced bonus because he impressed a regional VP last May by solving a problem in record time. I know what you are thinking…believe it or not it does happen. There are decent people out there who recognize devotion. It is also true however, that you never see one of these situations above. Say after 18-months of staying up three times a week and weekends you are laid-off. The next job might bring with it indirect rewards since during this past period you gained valuable exerience, and demonstrated seasoning and devotion. Just make sure you adveritise this devotion in the job interview.

      In all, that Sunday after Thanksgiving in Chicago while your extended family is back in Georgia paints a negative picture to those reading who can relate, also know the sacrifice has lead to a career benefits one way or another later on.

      A small note on organizing support. I have some experience in this area over many organizations. There is no totally fair support structure that has been created by humans or computers to date. You train help desk people, they leave for better jobs. I would guess the one organization who has solved this problem in four year increments in the military. Take the satisfaction you get in solving these issues at this time of your career, and know that it won’t be forever that you are enjoying Thanksgiving on a raised floor!

    • #3284869

      Oncall policy – Took 18months to get this

      by snedgibbon ·

      In reply to How much time do you spend on-call?

      Definition of On-call

      Introduction There are several different types of On-call in ElectricityUtilitycompany IT. These are 24×7 support, extended support, and ad hoc support. This topic defines what these types of support are and how they differ.

      24×7 Support Definition 24×7 support is support that is required at all times. In many cases the applications that are supported under 24×7 support do not have an ?outside of business hours? to them; they are used the same way all the time.

      Extended Support Definition Extended support is support that is required for a set period outside of business hours but not 24×7. Extended support would not cover support overnight.

      Ad Hoc Support Definition Ad hoc support is support that is not known about in advance, or is not of a regular enough frequency to warrant 24×7 or extended support. All applications that do not have 24×7 or extended support may require ad hoc support. An established agreement must exist with the customer that includes the requirement for support, infrequently, outside of business hours and that this support is provided on a best efforts basis only.

      Rosters 24×7 and Extended support will have a roster in place that states who the Primary On-call person is for any given period, and who the Back Up On-call person is.

      Ad Hoc support does not require rosters.

      See Rosters page 13 for more information.

      Callout Definition A Callout is any call that is logged with a Total Service type that occurs after the On-call person has finished their normal working day and at any time during the weekends or public holidays. Calls that are received prior to the start of an On-call person?s normal working day can be claimed as callouts.

      Primary On-call

      Definition The Primary On-call is the person who is rostered on to support applications outside of standard business hours.

      Responsibilities The Primary On-call person is responsible for:
      ? First point of contact for all incidents raised to the Service Desk
      ? Responding to all incidents assigned to their portfolio outside of business hours as per SLA requirements
      ? Resolving, to the customers satisfaction, all incidents assigned to their portfolio outside of business hours as per SLA requirements
      ? Escalating issues with incidents as necessary
      ? Keeping the Service Desk up to date on progress of all incidents assigned to their portfolio outside of business hours as per SLA requirements and as appropriate
      ? Handing over to their Back Up in the case of an unplanned event that means that they are unable to continue to meet their availability
      ? Ensuring that any changes or issues that occurred to the systems during their On-call shift are handed over to someone who will be in the office the next day if the Primary is not going to be in first thing.

      Support Availability Within the support times a person who is the Primary On-call person on a roster for support must be:
      ? able to be contacted by phone at all times
      ? able to respond to logged incidents within the agreed SLA time
      ? able to be working on resolving the incident within 30 minutes, includes contacting customers via telephone.
      ? able to be in the office and working within a reasonable time relative to the SLA for the incident.

      Remuneration The Primary On-call person will be paid an availability allowance and an hourly rate for the hours worked

      For further information on remuneration see Remuneration on page 15

      Reporting The Primary On-call is required to:
      ? ensure that all Callouts are marked as such in the Service Desk tool
      ? report to the Portfolio Manager the number of Callouts
      ? report to the Portfolio Manager the length of time on Callouts
      ? report all time spent in the FMIS Time Recording system
      Continued on next page

      Primary On-call, Continued

      Planned Outages When maintenance that requires a planned outage is required to be done outside of business hours, it is expected that this work will normally be covered by the On-call person, plus any other resources as deemed necessary by the individual coordinating the work.

      For work related to a project, the Project Manager will negotiate the resource requirements with the Portfolio Manager.

      The Portfolio Manager may, at their own discretion, require the out of hours planned work to be undertaken by someone other than the On-call person e.g. the work may be specialised in an area outside of the capability of the On-call person. The process for the Portfolio Manager to identify, negotiate and assign other staff for this work is outside of the scope of this policy.

      Daily jobs Routine jobs that need to be done during the on-call period, for services that have either 24×7 or Extended support rosters, will be undertaken by the Primary On-call person.

      Back Up On-call

      Definition The Back Up On-call is the person who is rostered to be able take over the Primary On-call role if required.

      Responsibilities The Back Up On-call person is responsible for:
      ? being the first person that the Primary person can call for assistance if they are unable to resolve a problem
      ? responding to an escalation from the Service Desk if there has been no response from the Primary person by the end of the SLA resolution time
      ? taking over the Primary On-call person?s responsibilities if they are unable to continue for any reason

      Support Availability Within the support times a person who is the Back Up On-call person on a roster for support must be:
      ? able to be contacted by phone at all times
      ? able to be in phone contact with the Service Desk and customers at all times

      Ad-hoc Support Availability Ad-hoc support has no Back Up On-call provision.

      Remuneration The Back Up On-call person will be paid an availability allowance and an hourly rate for the hours worked

      For further information on remuneration see Remuneration on page 15

      Reporting The Back Up On-call is required to:
      ? report to the to the Portfolio Manager any time that they have to take over the responsibilities of the Primary that are not planned
      ? ensure that all Callouts are marked as such in the Service Desk tool
      ? report to the Portfolio Manager the number of Callouts
      ? report to the Portfolio Manager the length of time on Callouts
      ? report all time spent in the FMIS Time Recording system

      Application Specialist

      Definition An application specialist is a person who has specialist knowledge on a certain application.

      Responsibilities An application specialist may be required to assist if the On-call person and / or their Back Up are unable to resolve an incident. An application specialist is only required to use best efforts to resolve the incident.

      Availability An application specialist is not required to be available at all times.

      Remuneration An application specialist will only be paid for the hours worked.

      For further information on remuneration see Remuneration on page 15.

      Reporting The application specialist is required to report to their Portfolio Manager any times when they are called out and what they were called out for and
      report all time spent in the FMIS Time Recording system

      Managers

      Definition A manager is someone in ElectricityUtilitycompany IT who manages staff or contractors that provide On-call support for ElectricityUtilitycompany.

      Portfolio Manager Responsibilities The Portfolio Managers are responsible for:
      ? Ensuring rosters are in place, and regularly reviewed and maintained
      ? Ensuring that sufficient resources needed to do On-call are available
      ? Collect and review On-call reports from Portfolio team members
      ? Participation in the escalation process
      ? Approving additional hours worked as On-call for payment
      ? Defining the within portfolio communication process for Major Incidents
      ? Manage resource availability for out of hours Project work as required
      ? Review support and escalation processes and outcomes to ensure the agreed SLAs can be, and are being, met.
      ? Identify and undertake improvements to reduce the extent of out of hours calls, and escalations

      Other Manager Responsibilities Other Managers within IT are responsible for being available as required under the IT escalation processes and for approving additional hours worked as On-call for payment.

      Availability A manager (Portfolio or other) is required to be available on a best efforts basis only.

      Competence for On-call

      Required competence for On-call Portfolio Managers will define the specific competencies required for a portfolio team member to be on the On-call roster, or to be available on an ad hoc basis.

      On-call Trainee Individuals who have not yet attained the required level of competency (On-call trainee) may be Primary On-call, but only where a competent Back Up On-call person is rostered. The On-call trainee will report-in to the Back Up On-call before deeming an incident resolved.

      Changing Competence A portfolio team member who is deemed to be competent, but subsequently fails to sustainably demonstrate this, may be removed from the On-call roster, or be reclassified as On-call trainee, and be required to reach the necessary level and return to the Roster. Such action is at the discretion of the Portfolio Manager.

      Rosters

      Roster responsibilities Portfolio Managers will establish and maintain the portfolio?s roster.

      Portfolio team members will ensure that the Portfolio Manager is aware, in advance, of any leave that will be taken or any other factors that may affect the roster.

      Exceptions to standard Rosters Portfolio team members may negotiate with their Portfolio Manager, for an adjustment to the number and frequency of shifts. The Portfolio Manager may make adjustments to the roster at their discretion, but must give staff a reasonable notice period of change.

      Exemption from being on the Roster Portfolio team members may apply to their Portfolio Manager for exemption from the roster for extended periods due to special circumstances. The decision on the request will be made on a case by case basis at the Portfolio Manager?s discretion

      Leave and rosters The Primary and Back Up rostered people must not be on leave simultaneously.

      ElectricityUtilitycompany is closed For the days where ElectricityUtilitycompany?s Offices are closed, such as between Christmas Day and New Years day, the On-call provisions detailed in this policy apply.

      Filling a roster If a portfolio manager is unable to fill a roster they have the authority to negotiate with staff and contractors (not necessarily in their portfolio) to get the required level of support in consultation with the ElectricityUtilitycompany manager of the resource be they employed or contracted.

      Equipment

      Computers ElectricityUtilitycompany will provide laptops for all people on On-call rosters. These will be built with the standard ElectricityUtilitycompany image for the portfolio and no software other than that required for support of the applications is to be installed on these laptops.

      The laptops will come with bags that allow easy and comfortable transport to and from work.

      Remote Access ElectricityUtilitycompany will provide a suitable high-speed connection for all people on On-call rosters. Access will be via VPN.

      Building Access After hours access to the car park in ElectricityUtilitycompany house will be available for On-call support of services that require 24×7 or extended support. Car parks will need to be vacated during working hours.

      Mobile Phones Mobile phones will be provided by ElectricityUtilitycompany for all people who can be expected to be called for support outside of standard business hours.

      Personal calls can be made on these phones, and personal calls should be refunded as per ElectricityUtilitycompany Corporate policy ?Cellular Phone Use and Management?.

      Remuneration
      Overview

      Introduction The remuneration for On-call has two different types, Weekdays and Weekends, and Holidays. This section covers the differences.

      Contents This section contains the following topics:

      Topic See Page
      Weekdays and Weekends
      16

      Public Holidays
      17

      Weekdays and Weekends

      Availability Allowance An On-call allowance is payable for all people who are rostered to provide Primary or Back Up On-call. The allowance that is applicable will be applied pro-rata for those providing Extended support.

      This allowance will be $46 per full day on duty for 24×7 support, $13 per day for extended support (based on the support hours for Grid Tracker, Mon-Fri 7am-9pm, Sat/Sun 8am-6pm).

      Hourly rate An hourly rate will be applicable for all work related to incidents done while On-call.

      This will be the equivalent of time and a half based on the employee?s relevant normal pay rate.

      Minimum Payment A minimum of 2 hours will be paid for each callout. Any further incidents that are received during the minimum period from the first callout will be deemed to be included in that minimum until the total work is over the minimum.

      Payment for planned outages Work for planned outages outside of 7am to 7pm will be paid at the same hourly rate as for incidents.

      In most cases it will be the rostered Primary On-call who is expected to do this work.

      Time Off in Lieu (TOIL) Hours that are worked for Callouts may be taken as Time Off In Lieu (TOIL) instead of payment. The timing of this needs to be negotiated with the individual?s manager, and is at their discretion. This is managed under the ElectricityUtilitycompany workplace flexibility process.

      Public Holidays

      Primary On-call, Back-up On-call, and Planned Outages on Public Holidays Where a public holiday falls or is observed, by agreement, on a day that would otherwise be a working day for an employee, and the employee is Primary On-call or a Back Up On-call on that day, they are classified as a restricted employee. In these circumstances, the employee shall be paid:

      a) Salary for the day at the normal daily rate; and
      b) Payment at the rate of half time for any hours actually worked for the first 8 hours (with a minimum of 2 hours); and
      c) Payment at the rate of time and a half for any hours actually worked after the first 8 hours

      and will be entitled to an alternative day which will be paid at the employee?s relevant daily pay for the day which is taken.

      Ad-hoc and Application Specialist Callouts on Public Holidays Where a public holiday falls or is observed, by agreement, on a day that would otherwise be a working day for an employee and the employee is called out for ad hoc support or as an applications specialist, (they are not classified as a restricted employee), the employee shall be paid:

      a) Salary for the day at the normal daily rate; and
      b) Payment at the rate of half time for any hours actually worked for the first 8 hours (with a minimum of 2 hours); and
      c) Payment at the rate of time and a half for any hours actually worked after the first 8 hours

      and will be entitled to an alternative day which will be paid at the employee?s relevant daily pay for the day which is taken.

      Employees who are not classified as ?restricted? and who are not called out on a public holiday, will be paid their ordinary pay only for the holiday and will not be entitled to an alternative day.

      Availability Allowance An On-call allowance is payable for all people who are rostered to provide Primary or Back Up On-call. The allowance that is applicable will be applied pro-rata for those providing Extended support.

      This allowance will be $46 per full day on duty for 24×7 support, $13 per day for extended support (based on the support hours for Grid Tracker, Mon-Fri 7am-9pm, Sat/Sun 8am-6pm).
      Continued on next page

      Public Holidays, Continued

      Payment for planned outages Work for planned outages outside of 7am to 7pm will be paid at the same hourly rate as for incidents.

      In most cases it will be the rostered Primary On-call who is expected to do this work.

      Time Off in Lieu (TOIL) Hours that are worked for Callouts may be taken as Time Off In Lieu (TOIL) instead of payment. The timing of this needs to be negotiated with the individual?s manager, and is at their discretion. This is managed under the ElectricityUtilitycompany workplace flexibility process.

      ElectricityUtilitycompany Corporate Day The ElectricityUtilitycompany Corporate day is treated the same as a Public Holiday for anyone who is On-call at that time.

      Reporting

      Weekly reporting On-call personnel will provide weekly reports to the Portfolio Manager including the following information:
      ? number of times called out.
      ? Status when called out, i.e. Primary on-call, Back Up on-call, Application Specialist or Ad-hoc support
      ? Incident status (especially if unresolved)
      ? Commentary on the call-out period

      Monitoring The Portfolio Manager will monitor the following:
      ? Number of times a Application Specialist is called out and why
      ? Number of times Ad-hoc support is required for each application
      ? Number of times that each person is Primary or Back Up
      ? Number of Callouts the Primary and Back Up get
      ? Length of time to resolve Callouts
      ? Number of changes that are performed outside of Business Hours
      To ensure the On-call service if performing adequately and identify areas for improvement

      Time Recording All time that is spent on Callout work must be entered into the FMIS Time Recording system. Time that payment is being claimed for must also be documented to the nearest ? hour and given to the Portfolio Manager.

      The Portfolio Manager will approve the time and pass the information on to Payroll to process for payment.

      Obligations

      OSH ElectricityUtilitycompany are responsible for taking all practicable steps to ensure that the environment that the On-call person works from at home is free from hazards in the immediate work environment and that the equipment provided is safe and set up correctly.

      The On-call person is responsible for making sure that they understand what a safe working environment is and informing their manager of any potential hazards.

      Security ElectricityUtilitycompany are responsible for ensuring that there is a safe and secure way to access the building after hours.

      ElectricityUtilitycompany are also responsible for ensuring that the ElectricityUtilitycompany offices at which On-call work may be done are safe during times that people are working in the office.

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