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IIS and Exchange, 1 IP, multiple sites!

By camy2079 ·
Here's is my problem.

I want to host three websites inhouse.

I have:
-A range of 32 static IPs (T1).
-2 w2k Servers, web server and a print/file sharing DC.
-A SOHO3 set in NAT mode.

I will call my sites: site1, site2 and site3

My want to:

-Host all sites using one IP.
-Use exchange server. (The catch is that I have half the office using e-mails addresses assoc. with site1 and the other half with site2, but they are all on the same local domain with one copy of exchange.)My Questions:

1. Assuming I use IIS to host the 3 sites on one IP, using headers and alias to push to traffic to the proper sites... What if one types the IP, which site will it take them to? I gather that the header/aliases will point one that enters the URL site1.com to the folder which contains site1. But I'm stumped on the outcome if the user types the IP which is used for all three sites?

2.Should my web/exchange server be a member server of DC?

3.If I have users with e-mail address = name@site1.com and namesite2.com, what should my local domain be. Can I use both in one instance of exchange.

4. Should I make my local domain company.local or site1.com? In short, can I keep a local domain and still host site1.com andsite2.com and site3.com with e-mail accounts?

5.Would it be better to use seperate IP's for each site? If so, I need to config my NIC for multiple IPs, but what about the firewall and NAT?

6.Assuming my current config, can I have the webserver IP local (192.168.1.1) and have the DNS resolution IP set at public (68.68.68.6 and use a one to one NAT to point the private to the public. (Allowing it to pass through the firewall on the proper ports)

Any help would be appreciated! Details and examples please!!!

Chaz

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IIS and Exchange, 1 IP, multiple sites!

by CG IT In reply to IIS and Exchange, 1 IP, m ...

for your first question, Here's how it works, to host multiple web sites using only one public IP address, the web sites created in IIS are configured to use "All Unassigned IP addresses port 80 " with headers [www.<mydomain1.com] created on the Advanced properties page [see microsoft knowledge base article # 19000. The problem you see in a user typing in the IP address lies with ports. The default http [web] port is 80, therefore when a user types in name what that person really is typing inis 100.100.100.100:80 . If a person types in the IP address browsers assume the default port 80 unless otherwise specified. If a user wishes to access a FTP site via the IP address, the user must specify the appropriate port # e.g. port 21 for FTP, to reach the correct location. If you create 3 different web sites, you can specifiy each site to use a different port # [there are 65000 different ports] however users must know which port # to type in along with the IP address to reach the right site [not so easy to remember].

For your second question, Your web server doesn't need to belong to a domain. In fact, would be better if it wasn't as web servers tend to get the brunt of hackers interests [it's public so it's easy to find]. You can have your web server as part of a domain which allows other users on the domain to provide creative imput to the web sites [provided they have appropriate access granted].

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IIS and Exchange, 1 IP, multiple sites!

by CG IT In reply to IIS and Exchange, 1 IP, m ...

what it appears you are trying to accomplish from your questions is to provide Web Site Services, Name Resolution Services and Email Services and/or Email Fowarding Services. If this is the case, please write a comment to your question.

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IIS and Exchange, 1 IP, multiple sites!

by CG IT In reply to IIS and Exchange, 1 IP, m ...

this is a addendum to my answer to your first question.

Web Browsers assume that when you type in a name your looking for a web site and uses the default port 80, even if you type in just the ip address with no port # specified. That is how using names instead of #'s work. How names to IP addresses are resolved is nothing more than having a A record that says <Mydomain.com> is IP address 100.100.100.100. When a Name Server sends out a Question to the internet asking "WHO IS" <Mydomain.com>your name server [or a name server who is authoritative for your domain name ] responds "<Mydomain.com> is IP address 100.100.100.100. Email works basically the same. A MX record says <@mydomain.com> is IP 100.100.100.100 Port 25 and your email server listening in on port 25 for traffic accepts email send to your IP address. The mail server then reads the header [e.g. the recipient's name] checks it's data base and then stores the mail until the users requests the mail via Outlook or some othermail program.

As long as there are records created to resolve names to IP addresses and email names to IP addresses, and broadcast that to the internet whenever there is an inquiry about "WHO IS" one can "Host" just about anything provided you have the equipment to handle the traffic.

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IIS and Exchange, 1 IP, multiple sites!

by CG IT In reply to IIS and Exchange, 1 IP, m ...

the drawback to hosting email services is that clients have to connect to your mail server to get their mail. The most widely use mail services are SMTP or POP. Both require users to log in and then either get mail via a client program like Hotmail or download it for later reading. Heavy equipment investment. One can provide email fowarding services where users have a Web site like www.<mydomain.com> Email address @<mydomain.com> but want mail addressed to @<mydomain.com> sent to another email address. A MX record is created that basically says, email addresses to @<mydomain.com> is to be sent to @<mydomain"A".com or @<mydomain"B".com>.

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IIS and Exchange, 1 IP, multiple sites!

by CG IT In reply to IIS and Exchange, 1 IP, m ...

Ok. Internal web sites only for clients on the LAN.

This operates basically the same as for the internet except that you don't need to register the domain names with a registrar service. The names one uses are private not public name spaces.
Two Nic's verses one NIC with two IP address is kind of a resource consideration or just a preference based upon how comfortable one is editing the registry settings so http port 80 is bound to the proper IP address so there isn't a conflict.

For DNS name resolution, Technet article 168321 tells you how to create DNS records for either way so that Name to address resolution works for the different IP addresses.

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IIS and Exchange, 1 IP, multiple sites!

by CG IT In reply to IIS and Exchange, 1 IP, m ...

If you are trying to set up a web site for a company that has seperate offices located in different geographical areas, use the hierchey of name spaces with a master site page that links users to the individual sites for their respective office. <mydomain.com> as the master site with links to <site1.mydomain.com> <site 2.mydomain.com> <site3.mydomain.com>. Users just type in <mydomain.com> and then click a hyperling from there to to get to their area's web site page.

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IIS and Exchange, 1 IP, multiple sites!

by camy2079 In reply to IIS and Exchange, 1 IP, m ...

Just to clarify....

The sites I'm hosting our all sites used for within my company, not for outside clients. There will only be e-mail accounts for two of the domains.

Regarding the forwarding and exchange server, I'm thinking that it mightbe easier to forward the e-mails from siteA to SiteB, but not the URL traffic. Then I can change the "from to address" to siteb.com. This should be fine since the two domains are assocaited under one company (2 seperate divisions)

Any thoughts on setting up a NIC to use multiple IPs? I'm starting to think using 1 IP might not be the way to go. Although I don't think anyone wil lvisit the site by IP, I rather not deal with ports.

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IIS and Exchange, 1 IP, multiple sites!

by camy2079 In reply to IIS and Exchange, 1 IP, m ...

Sorry for the confusion....

The sites I'm hosting our public, buy they are our sites. I am not hosting sites for customers. They do not receive heazy traffic so bandwidth is not an issue. Right now, I decided to go with multiple IPs for each site, hosting them all on one server.

Thanks for your assistance....

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