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Impulsive Musings

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Communication - the lifeline of Project Management

by kesavan.hari In reply to Impulsive Musings

<p><em>by Kesavan Iyer</em></p>
<p>Literature on Project Management often emphasises the importance of having a project charter and an associated project plan for execution of any projects. These provide the guidelines for kick-starting the project. But there are two essential things which are important for accelerating and sustaining the pace of the project - <em>communication and follow-ups. </em></p>
<p>Talking about communication, there are two parts to it - (1) Communicating to your own team members and (2) Communicating to the client team members. You need to communicate to your team members on a constant basis to monitor the status of the project vis-a-vis the timelines suggested for the various milestones in the project plan. </p>
<p>On the other hand, communication with the client team is required for the following reasons: </p>
<p>(1) to intimate them of the status quo of the project </p>
<p>(2) to ensure that any receivables from the client reach us on time </p>
<p>(3) to arrange for review meetings on a periodic basis (preferably weekly) </p>
<p>(4) to get stakeholders' buy-in on the alignment of all our activities with the stated goals</p>
<p>(5) to discourage scope creep</p>
<p>Here one must note that communication is akin to the fuel for the car. But more important are the <strong>follow-ups</strong> which are equivalent to the regular maintenance check-ups that one undertakes for the car. For all communications that are exchanged during the course of the project to achieve the above stated objectives, one must take care to follow-up on the same on a consistent basis.</p>
<p>Such follow-ups also shall highlight to the client our team's sincerity and dedication in ensuring and assuring them of success as envisaged by the client.</p>
<p>***************************************************************************************************************************************</p>
<p> </p>

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Communication - the lifeline of Project Management

by JohnGPMP In reply to Communication - the lifel ...

I agree that communications is very important to a project.  I believe we keeping in contact with the client also keeps the project alive and in the mind of the client.  Once the client moves onto another project, your project has a good chance to die.  In a matter of speaking, you have to "market" your project during the lifetime of the project to make sure that the project's priority does not change.

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How to Create a Clear Project Plan

by kesavan.hari In reply to Impulsive Musings

<p class="MsoNormal"><span><span>How to Create a Clear Project Plan</span><span><br /></span></span><b><span>In six easy steps.</span></b><span> <br /><b><span>BY ELIZABETH LARSON, PMP, AND RICHARD LARSON </span></b><span><?xml:namespace prefix =" o" ns =" "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office"" /></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span class="medium1"><b><span>One of the</span></b></span><span class="medium1"><span> critical factors for project success is having a well-developed project plan. Here is a six-step approach to creating a project plan. It not only provides a roadmap for project managers to follow, but also acts as the project manager's premier communications and control tool throughout the project. </span></span><span><br /><br /><span class="medium1"><b>Step 1:</b> Explain the project plan to key stakeholders and discuss its key components. </span><br /><span class="medium1">Unfortunately, the "project plan" is one of the most misunderstood terms in project management. Hardly a fixed object, the project plan is a set of living documents that can be expected to change over the life of the project. Like a roadmap, it provides the direction for the project. And like the traveler, the project manager needs to set the course for the project, which in project management terms means creating the project plan. Just as a driver may encounter road construction or new routes to the final destination, the project manager may need to correct the project course as well. </span><br /><br /><span class="medium1">A common misconception is that the plan equates to the project timeline, which is only one of the components of the plan. The project plan is the major work product from the entire planning process, so it contains all the planning documents. For example, a project plan for constructing a new office building needs to include not only the specifications for the building, the budget and the schedule, but also the risks, quality metrics, environmental impact, etc. </span><br /><br /><span class="medium1">Components of the project plan include: </span></span></p>
<ul type="disc">
<li class="MsoNormal"><i><span>Baselines:</span></i><span> These are sometimes called performance measures because the performance of the entire project is measured against them. They are the project's three approved starting points for scope, schedule and cost. These provide the stakes in the ground, and are used to determine whether or not the project is on track during execution. </span></li>
<li class="MsoNormal"><i><span>Baseline management plans:</span></i><span> These include documentation on how variances will be handled throughout the project. </span></li>
<li class="MsoNormal"><i><span>Other work products from the planning process:</span></i><span> These include plans for risk management, quality, procurement, staffing and communications. </span></li></ul>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span class="medium1"><b><span>Step 2:</span></b></span><span class="medium1"><span> Define roles and responsibilities. </span></span><span><br /><span class="medium1">Identifying stakeholders ? those who have a vested interest in either the project or the project outcome ? is challenging and especially difficult on large, risky, high-impact projects. There are likely to be conflicting agendas and requirements among stakeholders, as well as different slants on who needs to be included. For example, the stakeholder list of the city council where a new office building is being constructed could differ from that of an engineering consulting firm. It would certainly include the developer who wants to build the office complex, the engineering firm that will build the office building, citizens who would prefer a city park, consultants to study the environmental impacts, the city council itself, etc. The engineering firm may have a more limited view. It is important for the project manager to get clarity and agreement on what work needs to be done by whom, as well as which decisions each stakeholder will make. </span><br /><br /><span class="medium1"><b>Step 3:</b> Develop a scope statement. </span><br /><span class="medium1">The scope statement is arguably the most important document in the project plan. It is used to get common agreement among the stakeholders about the project definition. It is the basis for getting the buy-in and agreement from the sponsor and other stakeholders and decreases the chances of miscommunication. This document will most likely grow and change with the life of the project. The scope statement should include: </span></span></p>
<ul type="disc">
<li class="MsoNormal"><span>Business need and business problem </span></li>
<li class="MsoNormal"><span>Project objectives, stating what will occur within the project to solve the business problem </span></li>
<li class="MsoNormal"><span>Benefits of completing the project, as well as the project justification </span></li>
<li class="MsoNormal"><span>Project scope, stated as which deliverables will be included and excluded from the project. </span></li>
<li class="MsoNormal"><span>Key milestones, the approach and other components as dictated by the size and nature of the project. </span></li></ul>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span class="medium1"><span>It can be treated like a contract between the project manager and sponsor, one that can only be changed with sponsor approval. </span></span><span><br /><br /><span class="medium1"><b>Step 4:</b> Develop the project baselines. </span><br /><span class="medium1"><i>Scope baseline.</i> Once the deliverables are confirmed in the scope statement, they need to be developed into a work breakdown structure (WBS) of all the deliverables in the project. The scope baseline includes all the deliverables produced on the project, and therefore identifies all the work to be done. These deliverables should be inclusive. Building an office building, for example, would include a variety of deliverables related to the building itself, as well as such things as impact studies, recommendations, landscaping plans, etc. </span><br /><br /><span class="medium1"><i>Schedule and cost baselines.</i> </span></span></p>
<ol type="1">
<li class="MsoNormal"><span>Identify activities and tasks needed to produce each of the deliverables identified in the scope baseline. How detailed the task list needs to be depends on many factors, including the experience of the team, project risk and uncertainties, ambiguity of specifications, amount of buy-in expected, etc. </span></li>
<li class="MsoNormal"><span>Identify resources for each task, if known. </span></li>
<li class="MsoNormal"><span>Estimate how many hours it will take to complete each task. </span></li>
<li class="MsoNormal"><span>Estimate cost of each task, using an average hourly rate for each resource. </span></li>
<li class="MsoNormal"><span>Consider resource constraints, or how much time each resource can realistically devote to this one project. </span></li>
<li class="MsoNormal"><span>Determine which tasks are dependent on other tasks, and develop critical path. </span></li>
<li class="MsoNormal"><span>Develop schedule, which puts all tasks and estimates in a calendar. It shows by chosen time period (week, month, quarter or year) which resource is doing which tasks, how much time each task is expected to take, and when each task is scheduled to begin and end. </span></li>
<li class="MsoNormal"><span>Develop the cost baseline, which is a time-phased budget, or cost by time period. </span></li></ol>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span class="medium1"><span>This process is not a one-time effort. Throughout the project, you will most likely be adding to and repeating some or all of these steps. </span></span><span><br /><br /><span class="medium1"><b>Step 5:</b> Create baseline management plans. </span><br /><span class="medium1">Once the scope, schedule and cost baselines have been established, create the steps the team will take to manage variances to these plans. All these management plans usually include a review and approval process for modifying the baselines. Different approval levels are usually needed for different types of changes. Not all new requests will result in changes to the scope, schedule or budget, but a process is needed to study all new requests to determine their impact to the project. </span><br /><br /><span class="medium1"><b>Step 6:</b> Communicate! </span><br /><span class="medium1">One important aspect of the project plan is the communications plan. This document states such things as: </span></span></p>
<ul type="disc">
<li class="MsoNormal"><span>Who on the project wants which reports, how often, in what format and using what media. </span></li>
<li class="MsoNormal"><span>How issues will be escalated and when. </span></li>
<li class="MsoNormal"><span>Where project information will be stored and who can access it. </span></li>
<li class="MsoNormal"><span>What new risks have surfaced and what the risk response will include. </span></li>
<li class="MsoNormal"><span>What metrics will be used to ensure a quality product is built. </span></li>
<li class="MsoNormal"><span>What reserves have been used for which uncertainties. </span></li></ul>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span class="medium1"><span>Once the project plan is complete, it is important that its contents be delivered to key stakeholders. This communication should include such things as: </span></span></p>
<ul type="disc">
<li class="MsoNormal"><span>Review and approval of the project plan. </span></li>
<li class="MsoNormal"><span>Process for changing the contents of the plan. </span></li>
<li class="MsoNormal"><span>Next steps ? executing and controlling the project plan and key stakeholder roles/responsibilities in the upcoming phases. </span></li></ul>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span class="medium1"><b><span>Destination Success</span></b></span><span><br /><span class="medium1">Developing a clear project plan takes time. The project manager will probably be tempted to skip the planning and jump straight into execution. However, the traveler who plans the route before beginning a journey ultimately reaches the intended destination more quickly and more easily than the disorganized traveler who gets lost along the way. Similarly, the project manager who takes time to create a clear project plan will follow a more direct route toward project success. </span><?xml:namespace prefix =" v" ns =" "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:vml"" /><v:shapetype id="_x0000_t75" stroked="f" filled="f" path="m@4@5l@4@11@9@11@9@5xe" o:preferrelative="t" o:spt="75" coordsize="21600,21600"><v:formulas></v:formulas></v:shapetype><v:shape id="_x0000_i1025" alt="" type="#_x0000_t75"></v:shape></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"> </p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span> </p></span>

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Second Life For Dotcom

by kesavan.hari In reply to Impulsive Musings

<p><span id="Ar0060101">ET, 05-May-2006</span></p>
<p><span>Private Equity Players, VCs Inject $75M In 7 Internet Cos This Year </span></p>
<p><span id="Ar0060106">Amanpreet Singh & Shubham Mukherjee NEW DELHI </span></p>
<p><br /> </p>
<div class="HTMLContent"><br /><span><!---->   <!---->THIS year clearly marks the second coming of dotcom companies in India judging by how heavily private equity investors and VCs are pumping money. Around $75m has been invested by eight private equity players in seven Internet companies since the beginning of the year. So whether it is a Kleiner Perkins, Norwest, Westbridge or Reliance Capital, their funds have been directed towards the back-in-vogue internet. </span><br /><span><!---->   <!---->What seems to be beckoning the PE players to India is </span><span id="Ar0060103">that it clearly has one of the fastest growing Internet-user bases in the Asia-Pacific. According to the Internet and Mobile Association of India (IAMAI), the Internet user base will grow from from 39m in ?06 to 100m in ?07. ?With increasing In</span><span id="Ar0060104">ternet penetration, valuable Internet businesses can be built much like the ones in US and China,? says Sandeep Singhal, MD, Westbridge Capital Partners, a leading VC firm that has invested in three Internet companies ? Times Internet, <a class="AP_LNK_HTML_URL" id="AP_LNK_ANCHOR" onclick="curArt.gotoLink('LNK_6_2')">Travelguru</a><a class="AP_LNK_HTML_URL" id="AP_LNK_ANCHOR" onclick="curArt.gotoLink('LNK_6_2')">.</a><a class="AP_LNK_HTML_URL" id="AP_LNK_ANCHOR" onclick="curArt.gotoLink('LNK_6_2')">com</a> and <a class="AP_LNK_HTML_URL" id="AP_LNK_ANCHOR" onclick="curArt.gotoLink('LNK_6_0')">Shaadi</a><a class="AP_LNK_HTML_URL" id="AP_LNK_ANCHOR" onclick="curArt.gotoLink('LNK_6_0')">.</a><a class="AP_LNK_HTML_URL" id="AP_LNK_ANCHOR" onclick="curArt.gotoLink('LNK_6_0')">com</a>. </span><br /><span>So why is this Internet boom different from the bust of ?00? ?Today, viable revenue models have evolved while earlier it was about euphoric valuations,? says Dinesh Wadhawan, MD and CEO, Times Internet. This time around the approach is more cautious and it is about ?balancing timing and market opportunities.? </span><br /><span><!---->   <!---->Not all successful Internet models in the West can be replicated in India. Investments in Web 2.0 and podcasts are still few years away. But internet entrepreneurship in terms of ideation and shopping for funds will begin now. </span><br /><span><!---->   <!---->Experts say that online trading, travel, recruitment, ticketing, real estate, classifieds and social networking are a few spheres ripe for investment in India. ?Rest assured e-commerce growth will not be hampered by lack of funds,? says Ravi Sardana, VP, ICICI securities. </span><br /><span><!---->   <!---->Leading PEs flush with ?India funds? are looking for viable revenue models to invest in. Dotcoms fit the bill when it comes to ideation and entrepreneurship. ?With low-entry barriers in the internet and technology space, this is where all the action will be,? says Deep Kalra, founder and CEO Make My <a class="AP_LNK_HTML_URL" id="AP_LNK_ANCHOR" onclick="curArt.gotoLink('LNK_6_1')">Trip</a><a class="AP_LNK_HTML_URL" id="AP_LNK_ANCHOR" onclick="curArt.gotoLink('LNK_6_1')">.</a><a class="AP_LNK_HTML_URL" id="AP_LNK_ANCHOR" onclick="curArt.gotoLink('LNK_6_1')">com</a>. </span><br /><span><!---->   <!---->Companies with strong revenue models, which survived the meltdown in ?00, have become stronger and have caught the fancy of private equity players. This is because more people are more inclined to move online with higher disposable incomes, ease of use, higher credit card penetration and assurance over safety. </span></div>
<p><br /> </p>
<div class="HTMLImage"><img id="Pc0060800" src="http://epaper.timesofindia.com/Repository/getimage.dll?path=ETM/2006/05/05/6/Img/Pc0060800.jpg" border="1" /> </div>

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What do I need to get ODBC to work?

by kesavan.hari In reply to Impulsive Musings

<!-- start main content --><!-- begin content -->
<div class="node"><span class="submitted">Submitted by admin on Wed, 2005-11-09 19:50.</span> </div>
<div class="node">Ref: <a href="http://www.orafaq.com/faq/what_do_i_need_to_get_odbc_to_work">http://www.orafaq.com/faq/what_do_i_need_to_get_odbc_to_work</a></div>
<div class="content">
<p>A working Oracle ODBC stack looks like this:</p>
<pre>+--------------------+ Visual Basic, Excel, Access,
| ODBC Application | Oracle Power Objects, etc.
+--------------------+
|
+--------------------+
| Driver Manager | This is ODBC.DLL
+--------------------+
|
+--------------------+ This is the Oracle ODBC Driver
| ODBC Driver | (SQORA7x.DLL or SQO32_7x.DLL) or
+--------------------+ driver for a different data source/ vendor
|
+--------------------+ Oracle's SQL*Net (only for remote database)
| Database Transport | or other database transport
+--------------------+
|
+--------------------+ TCP/IP or
| Network Transport | other protocol driver
+--------------------+ (optional - only for remote connections)
|
+--------------------+ Your Oracle database or
| Data Source | other data source you connect to
+--------------------+</pre><br /> </div>

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What do I need to get ODBC to work?

by Jshee42 In reply to What do I need to get ODB ...

<p>Your question is so incredibly vague.  What are you trying to use ODBC for?  Query?  Update?  Give some additional information and then someone might be able to help you.</p>

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What do I need to get ODBC to work?

by Jshee42 In reply to What do I need to get ODB ...

<p>Your question is so incredibly vague.  What are you trying to use ODBC for?  Query?  Update?  Give some additional information and then someone might be able to help you.</p>

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What do I need to get ODBC to work?

by JohnnySacks In reply to What do I need to get ODB ...

I have to assume you're trying to simply get a connection to view data from a simple Access or Excel interface. There's plenty of examples of ADODB useage in VBScript which use ODBC programmatically. First, you're turning a molehill into a mountain.  Forget all that stack crap, too much of a science project if all you want to do is access some data.<br /><br />1. Install Oracle client on your (Windows only!) workstation. Make sure you include ODBC driver.<br /><br />2. From Start Menu -> Oracle -> Configuration and Migration Tools, run Net Configuration Assistant and add a Local Net Service Name and make sure it connects to your database. If not, don't waste your time going any further.<br /><br />3. From Start Menu -> Control Panel -> Administration Tools run Data Sources (ODBC) 'OR' Start Menu -> Oracle -> Network Administration run Micrososft ODBC Administrator. On the drivers tab, make sure you see the Oracle driver (NOT Microsoft ODBC for Oracle! - that driver is nothing but trouble) If not there, you did not install Oracle ODBC driver.<br /><br />4. On either User DSN tab (for your profile only) or System DSN tab (for all users on machine), add a data source, use the Oracle driver and the service name you gave it in step 2.<br /><br />5. Go to Excel, click Data -> Import External Data -> Import Data menu item, click New Source button, choose ODBC DSN, select the one you just added, pick a table, save the dsn, select it, and import the data. (You can also create a custom query from Data -> Import External Data -> New Database Query)<br /><br /><br /><br />

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Useful URLs

by kesavan.hari In reply to Impulsive Musings

<p><strong>For Newbies:<br /><br /></strong>Tuesday, December 20, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/12/20-beginner-oracle-questions.html"><font color="#b4445c">20 Beginner Oracle Questions</font></a><br /><br />Friday, June 17, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/06/asking-for-help.html"><font color="#b4445c">Asking For Help</font></a> - Tips on where to go and how to do it.<br /><br />Thursday, July 14, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/07/oracle-docs.html"><font color="#b4445c">Oracle Docs</font></a> - For when people tell you to RTFM!<br /><br /><strong>Best Practises:</strong><br /><br />Tuesday, June 14, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/06/bind-variables-in-plsql.html"><font color="#b4445c">Bind Variables in PL/SQL</font></a> - Short answer: PL/SQL binds all variables (with some exceptions like dynamic SQL)<br /><br />Tuesday, January 24, 2006<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2006/01/gathering-requirements.html"><font color="#b4445c">Gathering Requirements</font></a><br /><br />Wednesday, March 01, 2006<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2006/03/handling-exceptions.html"><font color="#b4445c">Handling exceptions</font></a> - A how-to guide.<br /><br />Friday, March 10, 2006<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2006/03/handling-performance-issues.html"><font color="#b4445c">Handling Performance Issues</font></a><br /><br />Wednesday, August 17, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/08/keeping-tables-small.html"><font color="#b4445c">Keeping Tables Small</font></a> - In terms of number of rows, not columns. Improve performance.<br /><br />Monday, October 31, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/10/oracle-packages.html"><font color="#b4445c">Oracle Packages</font></a> - And why/how you should use them.<br /><br />Monday, July 11, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/07/specifying-insert-columns.html"><font color="#b4445c">Specifying INSERT Columns</font></a> - Why it's a good habit.<br /><br />Wednesday, May 18, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/05/steven-feuerstein-on-refactoring.html"><font color="#b4445c">Steven Feuerstein on Refactoring</font></a><br /><br />Tuesday, July 26, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/07/use-constraints.html"><font color="#b4445c">Use Constraints</font></a> - A how-to guide for people to whom I BEG to let the database handle the data's integrity.<br /><br />Monday, July 25, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/07/use-views.html"><font color="#b4445c">Use Views</font></a> - Why they're handy.<br /><br /><strong>Oracle Packages:</strong><br /><br />Wednesday, October 12, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/10/dbmsoutputputline.html"><font color="#b4445c">DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE</font></a><br /><br />Thursday, November 24, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/11/dbmspipe.html"><font color="#b4445c">DBMS_PIPE</font></a> - For communication between sessions<br /><br />Sunday, August 14, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/08/utlhttp.html"><font color="#b4445c">UTL_HTTP</font></a> - Including an example of how to get a stock quote from the Internet.<br /><br /><strong>Top 20 Lists:</strong><br /><br />Sunday, January 15, 2006<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2006/01/oracle-do-nots.html"><font color="#b4445c">Oracle DO NOTs</font></a> - From AskTom<br /><br />Tuesday, December 20, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/12/20-beginner-oracle-questions.html"><font color="#b4445c">20 Beginner Oracle Questions</font></a><br /><br />Monday, September 12, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/09/20-oracle-lessons.html"><font color="#b4445c">20 Oracle Lessons</font></a> - After my first few months of blogging.<br /><br />Monday, December 19, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/12/20-plsql-coding-tips.html"><font color="#b4445c">20 PL/SQL Coding Tips</font></a> - Inspired by an AskTom thread<br /><br /><strong>Book Reviews:</strong><br /><br />Wednesday, June 22, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/06/expert-one-on-one.html"><font color="#b4445c">Expert One-on-One</font></a> - A couple of mistakes from my favourite Oracle book.<br /><br />Monday, May 16, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/05/optimizing-oracle-performance-millsap.html"><font color="#b4445c">Optimizing Oracle Performance (Millsap, Holt)</font></a><br /><br />Wednesday, November 02, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/11/oracle-insights-tales-of-oak-table.html"><font color="#b4445c">Oracle Insights: Tales of the Oak Table</font></a><br /><br />Thursday, June 23, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/06/plsql-books.html"><font color="#b4445c">PL/SQL Books</font></a> - A list of my three favourite PL/SQL books<br /><br /><strong>Templates:</strong><br /><br />Thursday, June 30, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/06/oop-in-plsql-yep.html"><font color="#b4445c">OOP in PL/SQL? Yep</font></a><br /><br />Wednesday, July 13, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/07/stored-procedure-template.html"><font color="#b4445c">Stored Procedure template</font></a><br /><br /><strong>Great Debates:</strong><br /><br />Tuesday, June 21, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/06/natural-vs-synthetic-keys.html"><font color="#b4445c">Natural vs Synthetic keys</font></a> - Choosing primary keys.<br /><br />Wednesday, March 29, 2006<br /><a href="font">http://download-east.oracle.com/docs/cd/B10501_01/server.920/a96533.pdf"><font color="#b4445c">Optimizer</font></a> - Should we be overriding it in our application?<br /><br />Monday, September 19, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/09/plsql-code-storage-files-vs-in-db.html"><font color="#b4445c">PL/SQL Code Storage: Files vs In-DB Packages</font></a><br /><br />Wednesday, January 18, 2006<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2006/01/plsql-vs-j2ee.html"><font color="#b4445c">PL/SQL vs J2EE</font></a> - Where should you put the business logic?<br /><br /><strong>NULLs:</strong><br /><br />Friday, September 09, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/09/nulls-in-count.html"><font color="#b4445c">NULLs in COUNT</font></a> - Why counting on a column might get you a different total.<br /><br />Friday, June 10, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/06/nulls-in-oracle.html"><font color="#b4445c">NULLs in Oracle</font></a><br /><br />Tuesday, May 17, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/05/null-vs-nothing.html"><font color="#b4445c">NULL vs Nothing</font></a> - ANSI SQL is unlike programming languages because NULL is not nothing.<br /><br /><strong>Gotchas!</strong><br /><br />Monday, June 13, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/06/blank-lines-and-sqlplus.html"><font color="#b4445c">Blank Lines and SQLPlus</font></a><br /><br />Friday, May 20, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/05/multiple-foreign-keys-on-same-id.html"><font color="#b4445c">Multiple Foreign Keys on the Same ID</font></a><br /><br />Monday, July 04, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/07/sqlcode-and-sqlerrm-in-inserts.html"><font color="#b4445c">SQLCODE and SQLERRM in INSERTs</font></a><br /><br /><strong>How-To Guides:</strong><br /><br />Wednesday, September 14, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/09/analyzing-query-performance.html"><font color="#b4445c">Analyzing Query Performance</font></a> - using SQLTRACE and TKPROF<br /><br />Tuesday, February 14, 2006<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2006/02/bpel.html"><font color="#b4445c">BPEL</font></a> - For SOA<br /><br />Tuesday, January 17, 2006<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2006/01/bulk-binding-forall.html"><font color="#b4445c">Bulk Binding: FORALL</font></a> - Improve performance of bulk updates.<br /><br />Thursday, September 22, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/09/column-name-as-variable.html"><font color="#b4445c">Column Name as a Variable</font></a><br /><br />Thursday, June 16, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/06/common-table-column-types.html"><font color="#b4445c">Common Table Column Types</font></a> - Two tables with columns on the same type, but not actually related.<br /><br />Wednesday, August 24, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/08/compute.html"><font color="#b4445c">COMPUTE</font></a> - How to emulate a feature found in other languages<br /><br />Saturday, June 18, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/06/connect-by.html"><font color="#b4445c">Connect By</font></a> - Heirarchical queries, something you need to know.<br /><br />Monday, June 20, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/06/decode.html"><font color="#b4445c">Decode</font></a> - CASE's precursor.<br /><br />Thursday, November 10, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/11/dual-table.html"><font color="#b4445c">DUAL Table</font></a> - You've seen it, what is it?<br /><br />Thursday, May 19, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/05/dynamically-assigning-size-of-varchar2.html"><font color="#b4445c">Dynamically assigning size of varchar2</font></a> - You do it in other languages, can you do it in PL/SQL (and how)?<br /><br />Wednesday, May 25, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/05/enum-in-oracle.html"><font color="#b4445c">ENUM in Oracle</font></a> - Emulating a common programming feature in PL/SQL.<br /><br />Friday, July 01, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/07/extra-columns-in-group-by.html"><font color="#b4445c">Extra Columns in a GROUP BY</font></a><br /><br />Monday, August 01, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/08/import-export.html"><font color="#b4445c">Import Export</font></a><br /><br />Thursday, May 26, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/05/nocopy-hint.html"><font color="#b4445c">NOCOPY Hint</font></a> - Improve performance by changing how variables are passed to PL/SQL procedures.<br /><br />Thursday, December 15, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/12/oracle-and-perl.html"><font color="#b4445c">Oracle and Perl</font></a><br /><br />Thursday, February 02, 2006<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2006/02/oracle-and-soa.html"><font color="#b4445c">Oracle and SOA</font></a> - Covers Oracle's Service-Oriented Architecture at a high level<br /><br />Wednesday, February 22, 2006<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2006/02/oracle-sequences.html"><font color="#b4445c">Oracle Sequences</font></a> - This is the one Oracle carried on its main page<br /><br />Saturday, July 23, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/07/oracle-boolean.html"><font color="#b4445c">Oracle BOOLEAN</font></a> - PL/SQL has BOOLEAN, here's how to emulate it in Oracle's SQL<br /><br />Friday, July 29, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/07/oracle-by-example.html"><font color="#b4445c">Oracle By Example</font></a> - Bringing several concepts together to solve a problem.<br /><br />Friday, June 24, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/06/oracle-client.html"><font color="#b4445c">Oracle Client</font></a> - How to install<br /><br />Thursday, September 01, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/09/pivot-and-crosstab-queries.html"><font color="#b4445c">Pivot and Crosstab Queries</font></a> - A very useful technique for turning rows into columns, and vice versa<br /><br />Monday, April 03, 2006<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2006/04/pivot-queries-using-variable-number-of.html"><font color="#b4445c">Pivot Queries Using Variable Number of Columns</font></a> - Part 2 on pivot queries, when you don't know how many columns you need in advance.<br /><br />Friday, September 30, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/09/plsql-procedure-call-overhead.html"><font color="#b4445c">PL/SQL Procedure Call Overhead</font></a> - Is there one?<br /><br />Tuesday, May 24, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/05/random-numbers.html"><font color="#b4445c">Random Numbers</font></a> - How to generate them.<br /><br />Monday, November 21, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/11/raw-datatype.html"><font color="#b4445c">RAW Datatype</font></a><br /><br />Thursday, October 06, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/10/rownum-and-rowid.html"><font color="#b4445c">ROWNUM and ROWID</font></a> - And how they're used to solve various issues, and improve retrieval times.<br /><br />Tuesday, February 07, 2006<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2006/02/translate.html"><font color="#b4445c">TRANSLATE</font></a> - What it is, how to use it.<br /><br />Wednesday, August 10, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/08/union-all.html"><font color="#b4445c">UNION ALL</font></a> - How and when to avoid performance hits<br /><br />Monday, June 27, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/06/using-bad-names-in-oracle.html"><font color="#b4445c">Using Bad Names in Oracle</font></a><br /><br />Tuesday, October 04, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/10/using-decode-to-exploit-countnull.html"><font color="#b4445c">Using DECODE to exploit COUNT/NULL feature</font></a> - Applying DECODE and our knowledge of COUNT/NULL together in a little trick to speed up a query.<br /><br />Wednesday, June 15, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/06/variable-constraints.html"><font color="#b4445c">Variable Constraints</font></a> - Can you use variables in constraints? How?<br /><br />Monday, July 18, 2005<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2005/07/which-instance-am-i-in.html"><font color="#b4445c">Which instance am I in?</font></a><br /><br /><strong>Other:</strong><br /><br />Tuesday, February 21, 2006<br /><a href="font">http://thinkoracle.blogspot.com/2006/02/oracle-interview-questions.html"><font color="#b4445c">Oracle Interview Questions</font></a> - How to come up with useful ones.</p>
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Top Ten Technology Priorities in 2006

by kesavan.hari In reply to Impulsive Musings

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