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"What is a security professional, anyway?"

by informationsecure In reply to Information Security Scie ...

<h2><a href="http://searchsecurity.techtarget.com/originalContent/0,28**42,sid14_gci1188926,00.html">In TechTarget's "SearchSecurity.com" site</a>, contributer <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pete_Herzog">Pete Herzog</a> discusses the "<em>serious issue, that of who really is an information security professional, and who may simply be masquerading as one</em>." </h2>Pete says "<em>On-the-job success still comes down to ability. Through the ages, being a professional has always been about applying what you know. Two-hundred years ago, a blacksmith with only the knowledge of all the smithy best practices couldn't get a job if he didn't have the actual ability to smith what needs to be </em><em>"smithed."</em>"<br /><br />Everything Pete says in his article is absolutely correct.  Generic security qualifications across multiple "domains" in which the practitioner may never have actually practiced are really quite farcical.  Good memory skills in an exam do not in themselves equate to wisely applied information security skills in the field!  <br /><br />The fact that an exam applicant may be required to have worked in the InfoSec field for a minimum of 4 years does <strong>nothing at all</strong> to prove that their experience was wide-ranging!<br /><br />However, an important and interrelated matter, which Pete did <em>not</em> mention, is the problem of the high cost of professional certifications. I don't know if this is a significant problem for people in wealthy countries such as the US or the UK, but for most of the information security practitioners in the world, these costs certainly are.<br /><br /><strong>A Viable Solution</strong><br />I believe the solution - to both the problem of prohibitive cost and that of meaningless certifications, is to return to the idea of the blacksmith Pete mentioned.  The blacksmith served an apprenticeship under the close supervision of an approved "master" in the trade.  <br /><br /><strong>InfoSec Apprenticeships</strong><br />Modern InfoSec apprenticeships should incorporate regular theoretical learning, together with daily application and testing of the apprentice's knowledge in a real -world work environment.  Having reached a reasonable degree of skill, a board of "masters" should examine them .  If the board agree that the apprentice is worthy of certification, the certificate should specifically mention the InfoSec areas in which the person has experience.  <br /><br /><strong>A Certificate Providing Useful Information</strong><br />An employer will know with a fair degree of certainty what a prospective employee is already capable of, and where they will require further training and/or experience.  They can be assured that the "blacksmith" really does know more than the mere principles of the trade.<br /><br /><strong>This is a solution which... </strong><br /><ul><li>Will work in <em>any</em> country - rich or poor</li><li>Will not be <em>expensive</em> for the apprentice while training... in fact they should expect a living wage</li><li>Will provide employers or clients of the InfoSec professional <em>a very reliable benchmark</em> of their skill set</li></ul><br /><strong>What do you think about this concept?</strong>  

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Copyrights and Patents - Slowing innovation and decreasing profitability

by informationsecure In reply to Information Security Scie ...

<h1><p>Copyrights and Patents</p></h1>

<p>While many of you
will have read the enthralling, disturbing, thought-provoking,
but <em>fictional</em> book "The Da Vinci Code"... and it certainly is of topical
interest ? my own interest in the [April] Associated Press article <a href="http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/wireStory?id=1814642">?Judge to Rule on 'Da Vinci Code?</a> is especially concerned with <em>copyright</em>, and the closely related the issue of <em>patents</em>. </p>
<p><strong>Good authors do research</strong><br />Many authors of
fiction do a great deal of research before publishing their book. It
gives a veneer of 'reality' which helps to make the book more
believable. People like "new" and "different" ? just as long as they
are not too different! </p>
<p><strong>Is use of research material a breach of copyright?</strong><br />If basing the
bare outline of a book on facts or concepts, originally revealed through
someone else's research, qualifies as infringement of copyright, then
this has far-reaching ramifications indeed. </p>
<p>Not only will it
be possible for huge numbers of fictional works to be challenged, but
also non-fiction books will have claims of copyright infringement made
against them. Non-fiction is probably far more frequently based on
research originally performed by others. Yet none of these are the most
frightening aspect of the matter. </p>


<p><strong>Death of innovation</strong><br />If the mere
inclusion of facts gleaned from another person's research can open one
up to the likelihood of litigation, people will cease to innovate as
freely as they previously would have done. </p>
<p><strong>Innovation is typically incremental</strong><br />Innovation is
actually seldom totally "new", but is typically an important
incremental advance, or a lateral offshoot from something else which
the innovator has observed. From an historical perspective, before
literacy became almost universal in Europe and the European colonies,
there was very little innovation. </p>
<p><strong>Invented today - gone tomorrow</strong><br />Much of that
innovation was discovered and then lost again, sometimes repeatedly,
throughout the ages. And this was during a time when there were not any
restrictions of copyright or patents! There were no limits to the
things you could try ? based on what you had seen, read or heard about.</p>
<p><strong>Literacy - a key to growth</strong><br />Literacy is
probably the single most important means to power that the world has
ever known. For well over 1,000 years Europe possessed widespread
literacy, but that literacy was jealously guarded by the Church and
limited almost exclusively to the religious orders. This hoarding of
knowledge held the world in an intellectual and economic stasis until
the close of the Middle Ages.</p>
<p>Today excessive
regulation and control over innovation ? through the means of
overly-restrictive copyright and patent law, threatens to hold the
"Western" world in a stasis which is effectively similar to that of the
"Dark Ages" in Europe.</p>


<p><strong>Giving away the advantage</strong><br />You may be sure
that "less-enlightened" countries, who do not feel bound by these
artificial restrictions, will have the wisdom to take every advantage
they can to improve their lot. </p>

<p><strong>Decline of the west</strong><br />Meanwhile those
countries which were the original source for world economic growth will
enforce extreme limits on their own innovators, and in doing so, will
find that they are no longer leaders in the world economy. Their
social, military and political power and influence will decrease in
concert with this change. If copyright and
patent laws are strengthened, or indeed if they are not reformed and
loosened, "Western" civilization itself is under serious threat of
decline.</p>


<h2>Judge to Rule on 'Da Vinci Code'</h2>

<p>Judge to Give Ruling in Copyright Infringement Case Against 'Da Vinci Code' Publisher</p>
<p>By JILL LAWLESS</p>
<p>The Associated Press</p>

<p><strong>LONDON</strong>
- Like a good thriller, "The Da Vinci Code" trial has had drama,
controversy and conflict. And it's ending with a cliffhanger which way
will a judge rule in the copyright infringement case against the
publisher of Dan Brown's world-conquering novel? </p>
<p><a href="http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/wireStory?id=1814642">http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/wireStory?id=1814642</a></p>

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The most trustworthy software is open source

by informationsecure In reply to Information Security Scie ...

<h1>The most trustworthy software is open source</h1>

The most trusted cryptographic software are based on <em>open</em><em> <em>source</em></em> algorithms...
This applies equally to the personal, private or public sectors.


<br /><br /><strong>Hiding in public</strong><br />Why should cryptography - an effort to<em> conceal</em> something, be more
effective, more trustworthy if it is open source? Surely it would
make more sense for the algorithm to be proprietary and a closely
guarded secret?


<strong><br /><br />The advantage of peer review</strong><br />When you have many of the world's <em>best</em> cryptographic
experts trying their utmost to find flaws or weaknesses in your
algorithm, and they are unable to find them - then you can be fairly
confident that a malicious individual will also have a serious problem
breaking into your data.

<p><strong>We all make mistakes.</strong><br />But we may be the last person to see our <em>own</em> mistakes! Just as doctors, anthropologists, historians and many other
professionals submit their work for review by their peers, so does the <em>smart</em> cryptographer.</p>

<strong>Open source makes sense!

<br /><a href="http://blogs.zdnet.com/open-source/wp-trackback.php?p=590">See also "Open Source and the Public Interest"</a>
</strong>

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Blog list: Useful Blogs

by informationsecure In reply to Information Security Scie ...

<div><p>Useful Blogs</p></div><div><ul><li><a href="http://spaces.msn.com/members/annemiekverwaijen13/">LÄ VIÐÄ ÐË ÄNNËMIËK</a>: Help for problems with your MSN Space / Also Photography!</li></ul></div><img src="http://c.spaces.msn.com/CollectionWebService/c.gif?space=infosec256&page=RSS%3a+&referrer=" width=1 height=1 border=0 alt=""><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://spaces.msn.com/infosec256/Lists/cns!445E3E4F5D29CAD4!131">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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Paradoxically, the greatest threat to security is people's lack of knowledge

by informationsecure In reply to Information Security Scie ...

<div><p>"<font color="#000066">Paradoxically, the greatest threat to security is people's lack of knowledge.</font></p> <p>Many computer installations are left vulnerable because of people's lack of understanding of security threats, and lack of awareness of readily available security mechanisms. </p> <p><font color="#000099">The more people understand security mechanisms, the more secure our systems will be." </font></p> <p<font color="#333399">Martin N Brampton</font&gt</p></div><img src="http://c.spaces.msn.com/CollectionWebService/c.gif?space=infosec256&page=RSS%3a+Paradoxically%2c+the+greatest+threat+to+security+is+people's+lack+of+knowledge&referrer=" width=1 height=1 border=0 alt=""><img style="position:absolute" alt="" width="0px" height="0px" src="p><div">http://c.msn.com/c.gif?NC=31263&NA=1149&PI=88469&RF=&DI=3**9&PS=85545&TP=spaces.msn.com&GT1=infosec256%3b1037"><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://spaces.msn.com/infosec256/Blog/cns!445E3E4F5D29CAD4!106.entry">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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Hardening your Windows 2003 Servers (esp Web)

by informationsecure In reply to Information Security Scie ...

<div><p></p>I have had extensive experience of a webfarm that was subjected to a huge number of attacks every day.? <br><br><span style="text-decoration:underline">My strong advice</span> is not to get <em>too</em> fancy in hardening your servers.? <br><br>It is all too easy to try to lock down all sorts of obscure settings which will provide <span style="font-style:italic">minimal</span> increases in your security posture, but may adversely affect <span style="font-style:italic">required</span> functionality.<br><br><strong>My advice for hardening Windows 2003...</strong><br><br>When you install:<br><br>
<ul>
<li>
<p><strong>Use Web Server Edition whenever possible</strong> - the attack surface is greatly reduced (and it is <span style="font-style:italic">much</span> cheaper)</p></li>
<li>Enable <span style="font-style:italic">only</span><span style="font-weight:bold"> </span>required server functions<br></li></ul>
<ul>
<li>
<p>Wherever possible,? <strong>databases and application servers should run on a second server</strong> - connected to the web server by a <em>second</em> NIC with a totally different IP, and <em>not</em> connected to the rest of your network.? <br></p></li>
<li>
<p>Ensure no programs are installed which you do not absolutely require</p></li>
<li>
<p>All unneeded services should be disabled</p></li>
<li>
<p>Only use TCP/IP (without NetBios support)</p></li>
<li>
<p><strong>Disable all ports and protocols which are not required</strong> -<em> appropriately</em> for <em>eac</em>h NIC! (TCP/IP filtering tab)</p></li>
<li>
<p>Make sure Service Packs and HotFixes are <span style="font-style:italic">always</span> up-to-date</p></li>
<li>
<p><strong>Always</strong> have <em>up-to-date</em> AV protection - <span style="font-style:italic">not</span> Symantec/Norton!</p></li>
<li>
<p><strong>Ensure that you have adequate, <span style="font-style:italic">regularly</span> </strong><strong><em>tested</em></strong><strong>, disaster recovery and backup in place</strong>.</p></li></ul><br>Then your biggest risk is from any application programming errors - fortunately W2K3 will catch and prevent many of those.<br><br>
<hr style="width:100%;height:2px">
<br><strong>At the risk of seeing like an InfoSec heretic</strong> - (<span style="font-style:italic">and not giving a damn if I do, since I have the experience to back up my position!</span&gt...?<strong> <br><br>I will say that IDS </strong><font size=1>[by itself]</font><strong> will not enhance your security</strong> in any way and for a single server is a huge waste of effort.?? IDS is useful for detecting some attempted attacks, for informing you about possible new attack methods, for helping with forensics including trying to track perpetrators of an attack - whether successful or not.? <br><br><span style="text-decoration:underline">None of this makes your web server any safer</span>.? <br><br>Additionally, IDS requires a lot of time to be spent on analysis.? Analysis is impossible if you don't understand what you are seeing, and you will still probably just waste your time if you only understand it poorly.<br><br>IDS is useful in certain circumstances - but is not a <em>preventative</em> measure.<br><br><span style="font-weight:bold">And remember:</span><br>
<h2><strong style="text-decoration:underline">There is no such thing as absolute security</strong> <br></h2>
<h2><em>Do your best</em> - more is not possible.</h2></div><img src="http://c.spaces.msn.com/CollectionWebService/c.gif?space=infosec256&page=RSS%3a+Hardening+your+Windows+2003+Servers+(esp+Web)&referrer=" width=1 height=1 border=0 alt=""><img style="position:absolute" alt="" width="0px" height="0px" src="p><div">http://c.msn.com/c.gif?NC=31263&NA=1149&PI=88469&RF=&DI=3**9&PS=85545&TP=spaces.msn.com&GT1=infosec256%3b1037"><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://spaces.msn.com/infosec256/Blog/cns!445E3E4F5D29CAD4!108.entry">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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Windows 95 - 98 - ME, They are of Historical Interest Only!

by informationsecure In reply to Information Security Scie ...

<div>In the <a href="span">http://spaces.msn.com/members/safetycenter/PersonalSpace.aspx"><span style="color:rgb(153, 51, 0);text-decoration:underline">Windows Live Safety Center</span><span style="color:rgb(153, 51, 0)"></span></a> blog,?<span style="text-decoration:underline;color:rgb(0, 0, 255)"></span>"CurmudgeonToo" worries that Microsoft doesn't support the ME operating system. <br>
<span style="color:rgb(0, 0, 255);text-decoration:underline"></span> <br>
I would note that Ford has also stopped supporting the "Model T"!<br>
<br>
Model T was not designed for the excellent roads and high crime levels we have today.? It was not designed securely <span style="text-decoration:underline">by <span style="font-style:italic">today's</span> standards</span>.?
There is no automatic door locking and the brakes are incredibly weak
and dangerous. It is slow and does not have the power to accelerate out
of hazardous situations.<br>
<br>
ME has a very insecure file system, is vulnerable to a vast number of attacks, and is? very slow and unproductive.<br>
<br>
Just like the Model T was great <span style="font-style:italic">in its day</span>, so was ME - but that day is <span style="text-decoration:underline">long</span>
past.? Today we need far more stable and secure systems than could
ever have been envisioned in the early days of motoring or computing.<br>
<br>
IT security professionals such as myself have no honest option other than to tell clients: <font style="font-family:times new roman,times,serif;text-decoration:underline" size=3><span style="color:rgb(255, 0, 0)">"The only way to secure the (obsolete) 95, 98, ME operating system is to get rid of it"</span></font><font style="font-family:times new roman,times,serif;text-decoration:underline" size=3>.</font><br>
<span style="font-weight:bold"><br>
Any organisation which still uses these vintage operating systems on their network is
making the same sort of security error that they would if they left all
their doors open and unguarded every night!<br>
</span><br>
I have collections of antique computers and various old operating
systems - I don't pretend to myself or anyone else that they are of
anything but? historical interest today. <span style="font-weight:bold"><br>
<br>
</span><span style="font-weight:bold"><br>
</span></div><img src="http://c.spaces.msn.com/CollectionWebService/c.gif?space=infosec256&page=RSS%3a+Windows+95+-+98+-+ME%2c+They+are+of+Historical+Interest+Only!&referrer=" width=1 height=1 border=0 alt=""><img style="position:absolute" alt="" width="0px" height="0px" src="p><div">http://c.msn.com/c.gif?NC=31263&NA=1149&PI=88469&RF=&DI=3**9&PS=85545&TP=spaces.msn.com&GT1=infosec256%3b1037"><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://spaces.msn.com/infosec256/Blog/cns!445E3E4F5D29CAD4!109.entry">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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Can you trust software code you cannot inspect?

by informationsecure In reply to Information Security Scie ...

<div><div><font size=5><font color="#ff0000"><strong>The most trusted cryptographic software are based on <em>open</em></strong><em> <em>source</em></em> algorithms.</font></font>? <br><br><br><font size=3>Why should cryptography, an effort to conceal something -?be <em>more</em> <em>effective</em>, <em>more trustworthy</em> if it is open source?? Surely it would make more sense for the algorithm to be proprietary and a closely guarded secret?<br><br><strong>The answer is simple - the advantage of peer review</strong> <br><br>When you have many of the world's <em>best</em> cryptographic experts trying their utmost to find flaws or weaknesses in your algorithm, and they are unable to find them - then you can be fairly confident that a malicious individual will also have a serious problem breaking into your data.<br><br><strong>We all make mistakes. But we may be the<em> </em>last</strong> <strong>person to see our own mistakes!</strong></font></div>
<div><font size=3><br>Just as doctors, anthropologists, historians and many other professionals submit their work for review by their peers, so does the <em>smart</em> cryptographer.<br></font><br><font style="color:rgb(127,0,63);background-color:rgb(223,255,1**)" size=4><strong><font style="background-color:#ffffff" face="Lucida Handwriting, Cursive">Open source makes sense!<br></font><br><font style="background-color:#ccffff" color="#0000ff" size=1><a href="u>See">http://blogs.zdnet.com/open-source/wp-trackback.php?p=590"><u>See also "Open Source and the Public Interest"</u></a></font><br><br></div></strong></font></div><img src="http://c.spaces.msn.com/CollectionWebService/c.gif?space=infosec256&page=RSS%3a+Can+you+trust+software+code+you+cannot+inspect%3f&referrer=" width=1 height=1 border=0 alt=""><img style="position:absolute" alt="" width="0px" height="0px" src="p><div">http://c.msn.com/c.gif?NC=31263&NA=1149&PI=88469&RF=&DI=3**9&PS=85545&TP=spaces.msn.com&GT1=infosec256%3b1037"><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://spaces.msn.com/infosec256/Blog/cns!445E3E4F5D29CAD4!210.entry">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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Can you trust your security software?

by informationsecure In reply to Information Security Scie ...

<div><div>
<h1>McAfee software causes havoc</h1>
<p><a href="font">http://www.techworld.com/security/news/index.cfm?RSS&NewsID=5555"><font color="#0000ff">According to TechWorld's Matthew Broersma, McAfee's antivirus products went haywire last Friday</font></a>, deleting or moving a huge array of different file types from their customer's computers.? These included Excel spreadsheet files, which are typically used to hold important financial and planning information.</p>
<p>A person posting a message in the Internet Storm Center, claimed that the McAfee product was causing more destruction than a malicious program such as a virus would have done!</p>
<p>Was this incident "just" brought about through bad testing and poor quality control procedures in McAfee?? Or did it occur as a result of a hacker compromising McAfee's development servers?? I guess we'll never know, but either way it reflects very badly on this company's ability to help you secure your computers.</p></div></div><img src="http://c.spaces.msn.com/CollectionWebService/c.gif?space=infosec256&page=RSS%3a+Can+you+trust+your+security+software%3f&referrer=" width=1 height=1 border=0 alt=""><img style="position:absolute" alt="" width="0px" height="0px" src="p><div">http://c.msn.com/c.gif?NC=31263&NA=1149&PI=88469&RF=&DI=3**9&PS=85545&TP=spaces.msn.com&GT1=infosec256%3b1037"><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://spaces.msn.com/infosec256/Blog/cns!445E3E4F5D29CAD4!211.entry">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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Software Patents are a "BAD THING"!

by informationsecure In reply to Information Security Scie ...

<div><table style="width:100%" cellspacing=0 cellpadding=0 width="100%" border=0>
<tbody>
<tr style="">
<td>
<p><b><span style="font-family:Arial"><font size=3>Software Patents are a "BAD THING"!</font></span></b></p></td></tr>
<tr style="height:6pt">
<td>
<p><span style="font-size:6pt;color:black"><font face="Times New Roman">?</font></span></p></td></tr>
<tr style="">
<td>
<p><font size=3><span style="color:black;font-family:Arial">Software Patents make it impossible to <em><span style="font-family:Arial">legally</span></em> do almost anything creative with computers, or the Internet, without being liable to pay a lot of different people a lot of money for each <i>already</i> patented part of your software or web site etcetera.<span style=""><font face=Arial>? </font></span>But finding out who all those people <u>are</u> may be all but impossible!</span><span style="font-size:8.5pt;color:black"></span></font></p>
<p><span style="font-size:8.5pt;color:black"><font face="Times New Roman">?</font></span></p>
<p><font size=3><span style="color:black;font-family:Arial">Although you might be a ?good citizen? and pay the holder of the patents in the USA for the right to use "<i>their</i>" technology in your website, you can still fall foul of a foreign patent law when a person uses your web site in Europe, or in any other jurisdiction.</span><span style="font-size:8.5pt;color:black"></span></font></p>
<p><span style="font-size:8.5pt;color:black"><font face="Times New Roman">?</font></span></p>
<p><span style="color:black;font-family:Arial"><font size=3>For an example relating to the scenario of a web-shopping site, see this URL </font><a href="font">http://webshop.ffii.org/"><font color="#0000ff" size=3>http://webshop.ffii.org</font></a><font size=3>.? <u>But please remember</u> that it deals <i>only</i> with some of the <i>European</i> patents ? there are additional patents in many other countries - such as the USA! ?</font></span><span style="font-size:8.5pt;color:black"><font face="Times New Roman"> </font></span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:8.5pt;color:black"><font face="Times New Roman">?</font></span></p>
<p><b><span style="color:black;font-family:Arial"><font size=3>Think about it?</font></span></b></p>
<p><font size=3><b><u><span style="color:black;font-family:Arial">Software Patents:</span></u></b><b><span style="font-size:8.5pt;color:black;font-family:Arial"></span></b></font></p>
<p><span style="font-size:8.5pt;color:black;font-family:Symbol"><span style=""><font face=Symbol>?</font><span style="font:7pt 'Times New Roman'">????????? </span></span></span><font size=3><span dir=ltr><b><span style="color:black;font-family:Arial">Stifle commerce</span></b></span><b><span style="font-size:8.5pt;color:black;font-family:Arial"></span></b></font></p>
<p><span style="font-size:8.5pt;color:black;font-family:Symbol"><span style=""><font face=Symbol>?</font><span style="font:7pt 'Times New Roman'">????????? </span></span></span><font size=3><span dir=ltr><b><span style="color:black;font-family:Arial">Drive up the development costs</span></b></span><b><span style="font-size:8.5pt;color:black;font-family:Arial"></span></b></font></p>
<p><span style="font-size:8.5pt;color:black;font-family:Symbol"><span style=""><font face=Symbol>?</font><span style="font:7pt 'Times New Roman'">????????? </span></span></span><font size=3><span dir=ltr><b><span style="color:black;font-family:Arial">Increase the likelihood of litigation</span></b></span><b><span style="font-size:8.5pt;color:black;font-family:Arial"></span></b></font></p>
<p><span style="font-size:8.5pt;color:black;font-family:Symbol"><span style=""><font face=Symbol>?</font><span style="font:7pt 'Times New Roman'">????????? </span></span></span><font size=3><span dir=ltr><b><span style="color:black;font-family:Arial">Act as a serious brake on invention</span></b></span><b><span style="font-size:8.5pt;color:black;font-family:Arial"></span></b></font></p>
<p><font size=3><span style="color:black;font-family:Arial">?</span><span style="font-size:8.5pt;color:black"></span></font></p>
<p><b><span style="font-size:18pt;color:red;font-family:Arial">Software Patents are a <u>BAD THING</u>!</span></b><b><span style="font-size:18pt;color:black;font-family:Arial"></span></b></p></td></tr></tbody></table>
<p><font face="Times New Roman" size=3>?</font></p></div><img src="http://c.spaces.msn.com/CollectionWebService/c.gif?space=infosec256&page=RSS%3a+Software+Patents+are+a+%22BAD+THING%22!&referrer=" width=1 height=1 border=0 alt=""><img style="position:absolute" alt="" width="0px" height="0px" src="p><div">http://c.msn.com/c.gif?NC=31263&NA=1149&PI=88469&RF=&DI=3**9&PS=85545&TP=spaces.msn.com&GT1=infosec256%3b1037"><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://spaces.msn.com/infosec256/Blog/cns!445E3E4F5D29CAD4!227.entry">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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