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Internet Video and Interactive from a Sh

By brian.catt ·
Hi,

I need to understand how to make interactive
connections from behind a shared Internet
connection on a router/modem, which
supports NAT/DMZ/DHCP technologies and
all sorts of clever stuff they give no infomation
on in the docs.. Can it be done and how?

I have a D-Link DSL 504 Modem/Router I'm
using to connect a Mac on OS 9.1and a PC on
Me to DSL. It has a comprehensive set of
management tools most of which look like
level 2 support items and are meaningless to
me.

Is there a white paper or monograph about
how these connections work? How does an
incoming data stream from the Internet know
which LAN device to go to if there is only one
Internet IP address?

I do know what NAT and DHCP do in principal,
the network addresses are 196.168.0.xx, etc.,
the router gets an assigned Internet address
from BT each connection but I can't get what
the machine looks like to Internet with winipcfg
or the other routines, I just get the LAN IP
address.

As you will see I am not an IP expert, I know
the principles but not the detail or acronyms
required to do router configs. I am hoping its
been designed so an end user with no
technical skills can set it up, but am down in
the bytes for the basics already ... any help I
can use?

I can read and follow instruction. I researched
the LAN and DSL requirements and set it all
up myself, now find I can't video conference or
play interactive games which was half the
reason..... this is a great industry! Thanks for
any help.

Brian Catt

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Internet Video and Interactive from a Sh

by CG IT In reply to Internet Video and Intera ...

I'll answer one of your questions, "how does an incoming connection know where to go?" A: the router assigns the client computer a IP address from a pool. This address is then used when the client requests information from a site. The web site sending the information then sends packets of that information with the clients IP address [and other particular info] in what I'll term a "header". The router reads the incoming header information [along with some other information] and directs all packets to the correct client via the built in switch.

Here's a very brief and non detailed synopsis. Your computer uses ports to make connections [like port 80 is used for connecting to web sites or port 21 for file transfer]. If port 80 is blocked, you can't connect to web sites that need to pass traffic on port 80. Software programs like Windows update server also use ports for internet and internal network traffic. There are about 65000 ports that programs can use to conduct traffic. There is a group of engineers and others that handles defining what ports do what[type in well know ports as a search parameter in a browser and take a peek at some articles.
Firewalls typically block all ports until you specifically allow traffic [continued with comments section].

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Internet Video and Interactive from a Sh

by CG IT In reply to Internet Video and Intera ...

computer games need multiple ports to be open to run and each game might use different ports [check your game manual in multiplayer for which ports need to be open.

Your router can do a bunch of different stuff and D-link online help should havesome papers on it. If not, check out Linksys's online documentation on configuring their BEFSX41 router. I find Linksys's documentation great for understanding how to configure inbound/outbound port fowarding and is typical of how to configure fowarding in about all makes of home user DSL/Cable routers on the market today. What you can do if you have a firewall such as Norton Personal Firewall on your computer is to turn off the router's firewall and allow all traffic to pass through the routerand rely upon the individual computer's firewall to block or allow traffic. Norton Personal Firewall has the ability to monitor the installation of programs for internet capabilities [like games] and configure access automatically [or ask you what you want to do]. That way you don't necessarily are required to configure port fowarding on your router [which can be a chore].

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Internet Video and Interactive from a Sh

by brian.catt In reply to Internet Video and Intera ...

My, what big points you have Grandmother!

Very useful pointers to further reading. And I appreciate
this and know this will probably be a bit at a time, but the
answer only covered Games and interactive Video is more
important.

So I'll mark it unacceptable to keep the question open
in case specifics come along for using D-Link with Yahoo
or MS IM Video for example. I will look at the sites
mentioned, and ask D-Link how to configure these ports
also . Any Port in a Storm? I'll be back, thanks for now.

Brian

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Internet Video and Interactive from a Sh

by CG IT In reply to Internet Video and Intera ...

Since you don't provide any information on what programs your using or want to use for video conferencing [interactive internet video] it is difficult to provide a definitive answer.

Below is an article from Microsoft which can give you an overview of their net meeting video conferencing. If you provide specifics, a more definitive answer can be given.


http://www.microsoft.com/technet/treeview/default.asp?url=/technet/prodtechnol/netmting/reskit/netmtg3/part2/chapter4.asp

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