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ip again

By egarlepp ·
I HAVE TWO NETWORK SEGMENTS 150.150.1.* and 150.150.101.* i can ping both sides of them. i go into the network neighborhood of a system on the 1 segment and can see the individuals on the one but no the 101 and vis-versa. My question is what do i have to do to allow the 1.* and 101.* segements to see each other in the microsoft network neighborhood. Does igrp on a router have anything to do with it. Also what ports on the router need to be open for this to happen. What do i have to do on the stations or hardware routers to get this to work. we have a baynetworks router installed, do you know if ports 137 and 138 are enabled by default. Help
thanks for any help

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by calves In reply to ip again

I am not familiar with Baynetworks HW. But, did you try the static entries on the router since last time the question was posted?
On the router you'll need to enter something like 0.0.0.0 150.150.1.0 150.150.1.1 (assuming that 150.150.1.1 is the IP that interfaces with the router on that segment)
the entry means 0.0.0.0 (any request from any IP address) 150.150.1.0 (for this segment) 150.150.1.1 (send to this NIC that is the gateway for the segment. Usually conected right into the router)
Same on the other side:
0.0.0.0 150.150.101.0 150.150.1.1 (assuming that 150.150.1.1 is the IP that interfaces with the router on that segment)
The router needs to know where to send the request for the segment. For example somebody on the 1 segment wants to access a resource on the 101 segment, with the static entries, the router will know to which NIC to send the request.
Do you have a switch on each segment?
Are you connected right into the router?
Are you using DHCP? How many?
that will give me an idea o

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by egarlepp In reply to ip again
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by curlergirl In reply to ip again

If you have established the routing entries I suggested in my last email to you, you now need to establish a way to do name resolution. The easiest way is to have a WINS server on at least one subnet, preferably on both subnets. If you set up two WINS server(s), you can establish a push-pull relationship so that both WINS servers replicate the database from each other. Then point the workstations on each subnet to the WINS server on their own subnet as primary as the other one as secondary.If you are using DHCP to assign IP addresses, you can set the DHCP scope options to give the workstations the IP addresses of the WINS servers; also set the WINS/NBNS node type to 8 (H-node). This works best. Hope this helps!

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by egarlepp In reply to ip again
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by McKayTech In reply to ip again

Since you can ping from one subnet to the other, you have a route so that's not the problem.

By default, all routers that I know of forward all ports unless they are specifically set up as a firewall.

What you have is a browsing issue - Microsoft has an excellent troubleshooting guide on TechNet at Q188305. But it occurs to me that I don't know where your PDC is (or whether these are separate domains) and those can be important pieces of information in tracking down a cause. But I thinkthe article on TechNet will give you a start in the right direction.

paul

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by egarlepp In reply to ip again
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by ryank In reply to ip again

Your problem is not at the network layer but is probably your NOS. The computers that appear in the Network Neighborhood are not necessarily always deterimed by the configuration of networks and subnets on your physical and virtual network. It depends on what your Browse Master is (the computer that keeps the list that will appear in the network neighborhood).

If you have an NT domain then the PDC will always be your Browse Master. If not then you have to worry about elections and which machines will win them to become a browse master. PDCs will always win in a Browse Master election, followed by BDCs, then Member servers, after that NT/2K workstations, and then finally Win9x/ME.

If you have a peer to peer 9x/ME/NT network, thenNT or the first and longest running PC that's non-NT will be your browse master. Now IP networking will come into play. A non-domain associated browse master will create its' list via broadcasts and if IP is your only protocol and your router willnot forward broadcas

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by egarlepp In reply to ip again
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by clpadmin In reply to ip again

For computers on another subnet to appear in network neighborhood (Browsing), the routers must allow netbios broadcasts to pass through. But because this is usually undesirable, you are better off with using WINS. Follow proposed answer #2. Just to let you know, IGRP, or Interior Gateway Routing Protocol, has nothing to do with it. It is a routing protocol, that is, it is used only for router to router communications (to dyamically update routing tables). Oh, and ports 137, which is the WINS port, and 138, which is the netbios port (UDP I believe, and 139 for TCP), are most likely opened. However, the router, by default, does not forward broadcast traffic (which are any frames with destination MAC address of FFFFFFFFFFFF).

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by egarlepp In reply to ip again
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