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Is 256K enough?

By dbarry98 ·
I've got a tough troubleshooting question: Is a single 256K frame relay circuit (256 CIR) adequate enough for 100 Internet users?

A customer is complaining of slow response times getting to our Internet site and in our extranet environment. Upon a site visit, I found getting anywhere on the Internet took 30-45 seconds (yahoo, msnbc, espn, oracle, others...).

Using a 33.6 line from home I'm surfing faster than they are, even within the extranet. However, the customer doesn't feel their access is inadequate.

Is it warranted to suggest they upgrade their Internet access? Any suggestions?

Thank you for your time!
Dave

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Is 256K enough?

by michael In reply to Is 256K enough?

Probably. Determining how much bandwidth someone needs really depends on how much usage it's getting. How many people are simultaneously accessing the internet? What applications are being used? Five web developers could easily soak up 250k, butit might be fine for 100 very casual browsers and email users. Also, anybody listening to streaming radio or getting other broadcasts could soak up the line fast. I always go over how the bandwidth is being used with the client, and if/how they want to implement access policies. But think of it this way--250k/33.6k only equals 7 users constantly browsing the net as you would at home--and any downloads(including e-mail attachments!) can really eat up the bandwidth. You'll also want to rule out any ISP/equipment problems by going on site, disconnecting everyone from the internet except yourself, and see how the performance is. If it's fine, then I would recommend getting more bandwidth. Bandwidth requirements take some time and research to dtermine well and can be a very subjective issue, but I hope this helps some.

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Is 256K enough?

by dbarry98 In reply to Is 256K enough?

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Is 256K enough?

by spiceman In reply to Is 256K enough?

need some investigation into frame relays and sharing of 256K among a hundred users. Could be a bottleneck on connecting hardware or software like firewall or virus checkers or security setup on the system.

Check also the times when it is very fast and when it is slow. You need to eliminate volume from the equation. If after 20 users or so the service is slow then they need a faster connection. If it time related does it matter how many users are surfing or even one person experiences delay.

Check with the line provider (call or website) and usually have a guidance for ideal no of users supported. What ever they tell you reduce it by 20% as the maximum users supported.

Unfortunately when whole of USA is on the internet and Europe the whole infrasture of the internet becomes very slow even if you have T1 line.

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Is 256K enough?

by dbarry98 In reply to Is 256K enough?

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Is 256K enough?

by ab3_tek In reply to Is 256K enough?

256 is plenty adequate for 100 users. If the issue is slow response you should check with your frame relay provider and have them do a performance analysis. Have them check and see if you are bursting above your CIR and check link utilization %. Youwant to look at round trip delay int the routing portion and also look at the distance you have to travel to reach the backbone portion of the carriers network. All these come into play when dealing with frame relay access slow response issues. Goodluck!

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Is 256K enough?

by dbarry98 In reply to Is 256K enough?

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Is 256K enough?

by Nakul Malik In reply to Is 256K enough?

Bandwidth nevers seems to be enough to users.
-Fundamental Truth of Life

Everything is relative. I could have a T-1 and still not have enough bandwidth while the guy sitting next to me could be happy on his 33.6kbps connection.
I suggest you doa preliminary audit in two parts:
1. Ask the users about their usage patterns
2. Grab some stats off the network
This should give you some idea of your bandwidth requirements.

Next, kick everyone else off the network and stop further logins. Now open a session and record network stats. Perform the tasks your users typically perform. Multiply according to the usage stats you collected earlier.

This should give you approximate bandwidth requirements.

Contact your ISP and have them have the lines professionally checked for bottlenecks outside your network. Hopefully, you will have checked your own network for bottlenecks already.

(check the number of internal hops and try reducing them.)

Also, since you have a 100 users, consider using a proxy server.

If using a proxy doesnt help and if your circuit is giving you optimal performance, AND if your bandwidth needs do not exceed your current bandwith, It may be time to look at your network architecture.

If your bandwidth requirement does indeed, exceed the current bandwith, i guess all you can do is tell your client to take his bandwith up a notch, or keep his users bogged down.

-Nakul

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Is 256K enough?

by dbarry98 In reply to Is 256K enough?

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Is 256K enough?

by Trish_Sutter In reply to Is 256K enough?

How heavy is usage to the internet services? 256k for 100 users could be more than adequate.

Could be a problem too! It could be any number of places. Is it one customer or many? It is internet services only or all their services on their network?

We had a similar problem occuring on one server on our WAN. Found that it was a bad octupus cable in the switch. It was causing collisions. Take a look at the switches. Are collisions occuring?

Another time we tracked down to a faulty ethernet card in one workstation. Is the problem on one or all?

Good Luck!

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Is 256K enough?

by dbarry98 In reply to Is 256K enough?

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