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ISA Card troubleshooting

By dkane ·
In transferring a legacy ISA card from an old to a new computer system, the presence of the card caused the computer to not power up (system dead). Upon removal of the card, the system works fine. Since the card worked fine in the old computer, I surmise that the card is ok and the problem lies elsewhere, the bus or MB itself on the new computer.

Suggestions for troubleshooting from this point?

The card is from Digi Corp, and appears to be some sort of serial networking card...

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ISA Card troubleshooting

by SimGehlen In reply to ISA Card troubleshooting

You say that the card is from Digi Corp, and appears to be some sort of serial networking card. You also said that upon removal of the card, the system was fine.

Before reading further, ask yourself this question: WHY do you want to migrate theLegacy card into the new system. If you aren't even sure what it does, and the system works fine without it, what is the reason for trying to get it to migrate anyway? If it is a Legacy device it will undoubtedly slow your system down. If you don't need the functionality of the card in the new system, evaluate whether it is really to your benefit to devote more time and resources to resolving this issue.

Assuming you have a valid reason to try and get the darned thing to work...

The farther we get from DOS and into the new OS's, the more difficult it is to migrate Legacy devices from old systems to new ones.

In theory, it's a good idea ... buy just what you need and take what still works on the old system and migrate it to the new. However, in reality it can cause configuration nightmares.

Legacy devices frequently required manual configuration of the DIP Switch settings before installation to place calls for specific System Resources upon booting up.

A conflict occurs when the Legacy device & the BIOS try to place a call for the same resources.

To test this, remove the card and boot the system. Look through the Resource assignments in the Control Panel, Device Manager.

Jot down all the IRQ andDMA assignments, including the I/O addresses.

Examine the card you pulled from the system & look for DIP Switches [small toggle switches, or small pin jumpers].

Note how they are configured [there is almost always an indicator printed on the card as to how to set the DIP Switches in order to set the card to specific configurations]. If the card & the BIOS are competing for the same resources, there's your problem.

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ISA Card troubleshooting

by dkane In reply to ISA Card troubleshooting

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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ISA Card troubleshooting

by SimGehlen In reply to ISA Card troubleshooting

You say that the card is from Digi Corp, and appears to be some sort of serial networking card. You also said that upon removal of the card, the system was fine.

Before reading further, ask yourself this question: WHY do you want to migrate theLegacy card into the new system. If you aren't even sure what it does, and the system works fine without it, what is the reason for trying to get it to migrate anyway? If it is a Legacy device it will undoubtedly slow your system down. If you don't need the functionality of the card in the new system, evaluate whether it is really to your benefit to devote more time and resources to resolving this issue.

Assuming you have a valid reason to try and get the darned thing to work...

The farther we get from DOS and into the new OS's, the more difficult it is to migrate Legacy devices from old systems to new ones.

In theory, it's a good idea ... buy just what you need and take what still works on the old system and migrate it to the new. However, in reality it can cause configuration nightmares.

Legacy devices frequently required manual configuration of the DIP Switch settings before installation to place calls for specific System Resources upon booting up.

A conflict occurs when the Legacy device & the BIOS try to place a call for the same resources.

To test this, remove the card and boot the system. Look through the Resource assignments in the Control Panel, Device Manager.

Jot down all the IRQ andDMA assignments, including the I/O addresses.

Examine the card you pulled from the system & look for DIP Switches [small toggle switches, or small pin jumpers].

Note how they are configured [there is almost always an indicator printed on the card as to how to set the DIP Switches in order to set the card to specific configurations]. If the card & the BIOS are competing for the same resources, there's your problem.

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ISA Card troubleshooting

by dkane In reply to ISA Card troubleshooting

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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ISA Card troubleshooting

by TheChas In reply to ISA Card troubleshooting

2 possible solutions:

1. The card is conflicting with a motherboard component (USB, AMR slot, built-in modem or NIC)Disable the on-board devices in BIOS settings, then install the ISA card.
Or the conflict is with another card. Try moving yourPCI cards around.
Check the motherboard manual for the "default" IRQ assignments. I am sure that the ISA slot shares an IRQ with a PCI slot.

2. The card is causing the motherboard to flex, and is either shorting the motherboard to the case, orallowing the AGP card to wiggle out of it's slot just enough to disconnect a few signal lines.

Add support under the ISA slot with rubber bumpers, and try installing the card without the bracket screwed to the case.

Chas

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ISA Card troubleshooting

by TheChas In reply to ISA Card troubleshooting

Sorry for any confusion, I was not referring to the standard resource conflict.

But suspect an electrical conflict that is loading down the power or data bus.

The added information that the 5 volt standby power is loaded down is the key here.
It appears that the ISA card is using the same power line as the 5 volt backup for all power to the card.

I have seen a few motherboard with jumpers to provide more power to the PCI/ISA bus.

I know suspect that this particular card and motherboard combo will not work unless you have the power jumpers.

Sorry, Chas

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ISA Card troubleshooting

by dkane In reply to ISA Card troubleshooting

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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ISA Card troubleshooting

by dkane In reply to ISA Card troubleshooting

What I'm really curious about is this: I've dealt with resource conflicts aplenty, but this is the first one I've seen where the card is installed and that prevents power from getting to the computer. With the card installed, multimeter tests of the power supply's power good signal are barely registerable. To have a resource conflict doesn't the computer at least need to start the boot sequence to record the presence of the new device?? It's not even getting any power.

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ISA Card troubleshooting

by dragon_45 In reply to ISA Card troubleshooting

Check your bios setting. There is a setting for PCI or ISA. Make sure slot is set to ISA.


Good Luck
Richard Bolha

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ISA Card troubleshooting

by dkane In reply to ISA Card troubleshooting

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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